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Apple's cylindrical Mac Pro will debut in Dec. starting at $2,999 - Page 3

post #81 of 281
Quote:
Originally Posted by sflocal View Post

No he does not.  He's a one-post troll just being an idiot.  Sure I can grow my own vegetables at 1/2 the cost.  Oh wait, I got to factor in water, fertilizer, good weather, several weeks to grow it, and let's not forget my time I have to allocate to tend to the crop.  Oh, last night was freezing temperatures... I lost my crop.  Bug infestation?  Damn...


How's that "1/2 the cost" looking to ya?  Or maybe I just continue working, earning more income, and go to the supermarket/costco instead and be done with it?


That argument gets so old.  Thank you, but I'm done building rigs, with components from multiple vendors, hoping all the drivers for those pieces behave nicely, and of course NOT running OSX.


No... stupid comments from idiots like him are usually reserved for people that have way too much time on their hands, probably have dinner being served to them by mommy, don't pay rent, and do not have a social life outside of WoW parties.

My first paragraph was sarcastic. It's clearly silly to say that having a restaurant prepare good for you is a stupid idea.
post #82 of 281
Quote:
Originally Posted by emacs72 View Post

With respect to the newly announced Mac Pro

- An Intel Xeon E5 processor running at 3.7GHz is likely an Intel Xeon E5-1620 v2.  Released last month, you can get the CPU for $300 retail http://ark.intel.com/products/75779/Intel-Xeon-Processor-E5-1620-v2-10M-Cache-3_70-GHz?q=Intel%20Xeon%20E5-1620%20v2


- The FirePro D300 is probably based off the Tahiti core which makes it equilvalent to the Radeon HD 7800 series of GPUs released back in late 2012.  You can get a pair of Radeon HD 7870 XT for less than $500.
http://www.techpowerup.com/gpudb/1860/radeon-hd-7870-xt.html
http://shop.amd.com/us/Dealer/Amazon-US/Detail/GraphicCard/FX-787A-CNFC?SearchFacets=category%3AGraphic%20Card&SearchTerms=7***

- 12 GB of RAM will cost you less than $200

these components alone total $1000 plus applicable taxes.  the extra $2000, for the base model, is probably something Apple can justify.

Add motherboard, storage, power supply, case. Plus, "pro" grade graphics are usually more expensive than consumer/enthusiast parts based on same tech.

But in some scenarios this is irrelevant. If you are working in FCP or any other OSX-speciffic software, you simply need Mac.

On the other hand, if you are working in Windows environment, you will probably not be considering Macs in general.
post #83 of 281
Quote:
Originally Posted by nikon133 View Post


Add motherboard, storage, power supply, case. Plus, "pro" grade graphics are usually more expensive than consumer/enthusiast parts based on same tech.

 

- a motherboard with an Intel X79 chipset -- which I believe can support Xeon E5's -- costs around $400

http://www.asus.com/Motherboards/P9X79_WS/

http://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/chipsets/performance-chipsets/x79-express-chipset.html

 

- the price of a 256GB SSD is around $250

http://www.corsair.com/en/ssd/neutron-series-ssd/neutron-series-256gb-sata-3-6gbs-ssd.html

 

so those two components would add $650 on top of the CPU + GPU + memory cost of $1000.  that would leave about $1400 for power supply, case, I/O ports and enterprise class GPU drivers.

post #84 of 281
Quote:
Originally Posted by emacs72 View Post

- a motherboard with an Intel X79 chipset -- which I believe can support Xeon E5's -- costs around $400
http://www.asus.com/Motherboards/P9X79_WS/
http://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/chipsets/performance-chipsets/x79-express-chipset.html

- the price of a 256GB SSD is around $250
http://www.corsair.com/en/ssd/neutron-series-ssd/neutron-series-256gb-sata-3-6gbs-ssd.html

so those two components would add $650 on top of the CPU + GPU + memory cost of $1000.  that would leave about $1400 for 
power supply, case, I/O ports and enterprise class GPU drivers.

How do you get a CPU+GPU+memory cost of $1000? From what I've seen we're talking about $1000 for CPU and $1200 for the GPUs.
post #85 of 281
Quote:
Originally Posted by nikon133 View Post

On the other hand, if you are working in Windows environment, you will probably not be considering Macs in general.

 

I work in a Windows environment but I don't want a giant workstation box to put somewhere.  I switched to a MacBook Pro that sits on my desktop, closed, flat, used as another surface, plugged into my monitor, keyboard and mouse.  I just set the power savings control panel to not put the computer to sleep when the lid is closed.

 

Why not use an iMac?  Because it doesn't have a video input, and I'm required to use my work Dell laptop to connect to my work's network, so I have to connect a second laptop to my same monitor on my desk at home, (which has multiple inputs.)

 

Why not use a personal PC laptop to run Windows at home too?  Because they are bulky, slow, cheap plastic crap with short battery life for the same price as a MBP.

 

I built the first 6-core i7 Extreme a few years ago and put up with the huge and loud do-it-yourself box because that was the only way I could get the speed.  Now the Macbook Pro i7 4-core is just as fast but without the bulk, plastic, or noise.

 

I have every intention of getting the new Mac Pro to run Windows in Dec. as it's even faster, (I've been at the same speed now for 3 years,) and the bottom line is that I now need to run more servers in VMWARE Workstation at one time and can't on a laptop that only holds 16 GB RAM.  I need for my learning environment: Win2012 AD Domain Controller, SQL Server 2012, SharePoint 2013 App, SharePoint 2013 Web, etc.  I'm at 15.8 GB used right now with no room to grow.

 

The new Mac Pro looks awsome for running Windows fast, in my living room next to my recliner without the bulk or noise!

post #86 of 281
Quote:
Originally Posted by DrFreeman View Post

I am a bit surprised that Apple went with ATI. The CUDA by NVIDIA is more accepted in the industry. For PRO users that is an important point...
On OSX you would not develop to a proprietary GPU layer. You use OpenCL for any GPU computing. In fact, OpenCL abstracts so that it uses both the CPUs and GPU for processing.
post #87 of 281
Quote:
Originally Posted by akqies View Post

How do you get a CPU+GPU+memory cost of $1000? From what I've seen we're talking about $1000 for CPU and $1200 for the GPUs.

see my post on page 2.

also, a slight correction: the Intel C600 family of chipsets might be better for the base model Xeon E5 than the Intel X79 chipset. the price delta would not be more than $150 between the two chipsets. As such, we have

Intel Xeon E5 1600-class CPU - $300
Two Tahiti-based GPUs (Radeon HD 7800-class; 256-bit lanes) - $500
12 GB RAM - $200
Intel C600-based chipset - $550
256GB SSD - $250

If my math is correct, the total is $1800. The additional $1200 would apparently be for the power supply, case, I/O ports and enterprise class GPU drivers.
post #88 of 281
Originally Posted by emacs72 View Post
12 GB RAM - $200

 

You found 12GB of 1866MHz ECC RAM for $200?

 
256GB SSD - $250

 

You found a 256GB PCIe SSD for $250?

Come on. Actually do a real comparison.

Originally Posted by Marvin

The only thing more insecure than Android’s OS is its userbase.
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Originally Posted by Marvin

The only thing more insecure than Android’s OS is its userbase.
Reply
post #89 of 281
Quote:
Originally Posted by emacs72 View Post


see my post on page 2.

also, a slight correction: the Intel C600 family of chipsets might be better for the base model Xeon E5 than the Intel X79 chipset. the price delta would not be more than $150 between the two chipsets. As such, we have

Intel Xeon E5 1600-class CPU - $300
Two Tahiti-based GPUs (Radeon HD 7800-class; 256-bit lanes) - $500
12 GB RAM - $200
Intel C600-based chipset - $550
256GB SSD - $250

If my math is correct, the total is $1800. The additional $1200 would apparently be for the power supply, case, I/O ports and enterprise class GPU drivers.

 

First off, you would have to have the same ports, the same speed SSD, ECC memory, same processor, same level of GPU w/memory.  Seriously, I don't think you have supplied enough or the proper information to articulate what these descriptions and price is actually for.

 

So far, your abilities to come up with something that is similar is a TOTAL failure.  Plus, you have to add $200 for Windows 8 Pro, which you left out.

 

Go back and supply me with EXACT description and part numbers and source for me to double check your work.  You would FAIL in terms of what you have supplied thus far.  Piss poor job.

 

And while you are at it, start adding up how much time it takes you to look everything up, add another 4 to 8 hours to gather everything, unbox it, assemble it and install everything.  Now, the other part that you are COMPLETELY missing is support.  Your DIY POS doesn't have anyone that really supports it well, if a component fails, your system is down until you can get a replacement part and then you have to crack open the case, send the back part back, if it's even covered under warranty, and you don't get the ability to resell it and recoup much money should you decide to sell it to upgrade.    Apple products retain FAR more resale value than your DIY POS, and you still have a big space heater that's costing more money to keep it on and heating your room.

 

Sorry, but DIY computers are TYPICALLY for people that don't want to spend any money since they typically use them for playing games and screwing around.  REAL professionals will buy something by a REAL company rather than putting it together, just like people buy cars.  Sure you can take some rice burner, spend some money and throw together some cheesy fast and furious car to compete against a Ferrari or a Porsche, but it's STILL not a Ferrari or a Porsche it's just some modified rice burner that doesn't hold it's resale value.

post #90 of 281
Quote:
Originally Posted by emacs72 View Post

see my post on page 2.

also, a slight correction: the Intel C600 family of chipsets might be better for the base model Xeon E5 than the Intel X79 chipset. the price delta would not be more than $150 between the two chipsets. As such, we have

Intel Xeon E5 1600-class CPU - $300
Two Tahiti-based GPUs (Radeon HD 7800-class; 256-bit lanes) - $500
12 GB RAM - $200
Intel C600-based chipset - $550
256GB SSD - $250

If my math is correct, the total is $1800. The additional $1200 would apparently be for the power supply, case, I/O ports and enterprise class GPU drivers.

Ah, so you're not trying to figure out where the cost of the Mac Pro comes from, but rather using superficial and limited specs to find what you consider an equivelant DIY for less money.

BTW, where did you find a PCIe SSD for $250.
post #91 of 281
Quote:
Originally Posted by akqies View Post


Ah, so you're not trying to figure out where the cost of the Mac Pro comes from, but rather using superficial and limited specs to find what you consider an equivelant DIY for less money.

BTW, where did you find a PCIe SSD for $250.

He's just using the absolute cheapest (SLOWEST) SSD that's being dumped on the market.  He's using 480Mbps instead of the faster SSD Apple is using.

post #92 of 281
drblank: I'd like to see Kootur lay out a parts list with all the same specs and then build one for less than $6K - but then there would the fans the ginormous box to make room for all the TB2 ports, etc, etc, etc.

The real issue is whether he could bet Mavericks to run on the silly thing. Windows is, after all, Windows.
post #93 of 281
The only thing I'm beginning to dislike about this new design is that Apple doesn't offer "triangle modules" so that you could update your Mac Pro later. I think it would attract users who never bought a $3000 machine before.

For example, if there's a new generation of Xeons two years from now, just changing the CPU triangle module you could have an up to date Mac Pro at a fraction of the cost, making the original $3000 investment a wise price even for those users who want a powerful machine at home.

They should consider this kind of future upgrades, IMHO.
post #94 of 281

Parts are parts, but then there is the round case and the single, very quiet fan.

 

I'm wondering what configs will be like and prices?  Quad-core D300 machine, if upgraded to 6, 8 12 cores, how much do you think it will be?  The flash memory will be plus $300 and $800 for the 512 and 1TB over the base model, based on the iMac (so it could be a little more).

 

If a user has a 2013 iMac with 3.4 i7 quad-core, 16GB RAM and a 3TB Fusion (128GB flash + HD), how will the multicore machines compare?  Apps that don't use multiple threads/cores could slow down at the 8-core mark?

 

Your = the possessive of you, as in, "Your name is Tom, right?" or "What is your name?"

 

You're = a contraction of YOU + ARE as in, "You are right" --> "You're right."

 

 

Reply

 

Your = the possessive of you, as in, "Your name is Tom, right?" or "What is your name?"

 

You're = a contraction of YOU + ARE as in, "You are right" --> "You're right."

 

 

Reply
post #95 of 281
Quote:
Originally Posted by TYancy View Post

drblank: I'd like to see Kootur lay out a parts list with all the same specs and then build one for less than $6K - but then there would the fans the ginormous box to make room for all the TB2 ports, etc, etc, etc.

The real issue is whether he could bet Mavericks to run on the silly thing. Windows is, after all, Windows.

He STILL probably couldn't do it.  I haven't seen any Xeon based Thunderbolt 2 mother boards.  the only ones that exist are Haswell.    He obviously hasn't been to the Thunderbolt page that lists every Thunderbolt enabled motherboard.  All of them are either 2nd or 3rd generation Chipsets (non-Xeon) that are only Thunderbolt 1, and the only Thunderbolt 2 boards are Haswell and they only have a couple of ports, NOT 6 of them, so quite frankly, it is IMPOSSIBLE are this juncture for him to even say they can build something with Thunderbolt 2 and Xeon chipsets.  Apple is basically the only game in town for Xeon and Thunderbolt 2.  Plus I haven't seen any Thunderbolt 2 PCI slots for them to add TB 2 ports to a standard POS clone.  Then, it's getting the faster SSD memory that Apple is now using.  The only memory that is the same speed comes on a PCI card and it's about $1000 or more for something similar. And that's JUST for SSD memory.

 

Yeah, by the time they figure out the size of the power supply and cooling system, the box will end up being a great, but ripping expensive, space heater and NOT quiet enough for Professional Studios, plus it might be a big box that takes up a lot of room.

 

At this time, it's basically IMPOSSIBLE for anyone to create a LIKE product at ANY price.  But they seem to discount the need for Thunderbolt 2 which is GOING to be more widely used for the PROFESSIONAL markets.

post #96 of 281
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bergermeister View Post
 

Parts are parts, but then there is the round case and the single, very quiet fan.

 

I'm wondering what configs will be like and prices?  Quad-core D300 machine, if upgraded to 6, 8 12 cores, how much do you think it will be?  The flash memory will be plus $300 and $800 for the 512 and 1TB over the base model, based on the iMac (so it could be a little more).

 

If a user has a 2013 iMac with 3.4 i7 quad-core, 16GB RAM and a 3TB Fusion (128GB flash + HD), how will the multicore machines compare?  Apps that don't use multiple threads/cores could slow down at the 8-core mark?

There is NO XEON based motherboard that has 6 Thunderbolt 2 ports, so it's impossible to create a clone box that comes close.  Sorry, but parts is NOT parts.

 

Some apps that the pros are using do use multiple threads/cores, some apps don't.  So it's all dependent on the app.

 

SSD memory that's the same speed at what Apple is using is more like $1000 or more.  Go look it up.  OCZ makes PCI cards that are over $1000 for 1250mbps SSD and it takes up a PCI slot.  Remember, the XEON boxes that are going to run the faster processors and GPU cards NEED additional cooling (many times water cooled) and big power supplies and those things GET REAL expensive.   Look at HP Z800 series systems.  they don't even have Thunderbolt 2 ports, which are going to be used in the upper end pro market.  

post #97 of 281
Quote:
Originally Posted by ecs View Post

The only thing I'm beginning to dislike about this new design is that Apple doesn't offer "triangle modules" so that you could update your Mac Pro later. I think it would attract users who never bought a $3000 machine before.

For example, if there's a new generation of Xeons two years from now, just changing the CPU triangle module you could have an up to date Mac Pro at a fraction of the cost, making the original $3000 investment a wise price even for those users who want a powerful machine at home.

They should consider this kind of future upgrades, IMHO.

Apple has to look at next year's generation processors.  They might have to end up making a bigger box with a bigger fan/heatsink or a taller cylinder, so they have to design it based on what processors/GPUs they plan on using. It's not so simple as you want it to be, that's why they had to redesign the box specifically for the processor options.

 

In the old S-100 days, they had a back plane and you just swapped cards out, but those days are long gone.

 

Don't even think it's as easy as just swapping out guts out of a system.  It probably will never be that easy.

post #98 of 281
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

You found 12GB of 1866MHz ECC RAM for $200?

http://www.superbiiz.com/detail.phpname=D3-18R16GH
Quote:
You found a 256GB PCIe SSD for $250?

mea culpa; price is closer to $500 +
post #99 of 281
Quote:
Originally Posted by emacs72 View Post


http://www.superbiiz.com/detail.phpname=D3-18R16GH
mea culpa; price is closer to $500 +


Come on. Actually do a real comparison.
[/quote]

They can't. the first problem with these DIY idiots is that there is NO SUCH THING AS A XEON motherboard with Thunderbolt 2 ports on it. END OF STORY, don't even bother comparing ANYTHING, because it's NOT THE SAME processor.

 

SSD at 1250mbps?  That costs around $1000 or more.  Seriously, it's not even worth doing the investigation.  NOTHING exists at this time.

post #100 of 281
Quote:
Originally Posted by drblank View Post

... there is NO SUCH THING AS A XEON motherboard with Thunderbolt 2 ports on it

Yes, that's why I figured the price differential (about $1000 or so) accounts for the unique architecture of the Mac Pro. Read the first two of my posts in this thread. I stated my assumptions therein.
post #101 of 281
Quote:
Originally Posted by akqies View Post

Ah, so you're not trying to figure out where the cost of the Mac Pro comes from ...

Incorrect, but I'll let it pass.

Quote:
where did you find a PCIe SSD for $250.

error on my part; I've since revised the figure.
post #102 of 281
Quote:
Originally Posted by fixmdude View Post

I work in a Windows environment but I don't want a giant workstation box to put somewhere.  I switched to a MacBook Pro that sits on my desktop, closed, flat, used as another surface, plugged into my monitor, keyboard and mouse.  I just set the power savings control panel to not put the computer to sleep when the lid is closed.

Why not use an iMac?  Because it doesn't have a video input, and I'm required to use my work Dell laptop to connect to my work's network, so I have to connect a second laptop to my same monitor on my desk at home, (which has multiple inputs.)

Why not use a personal PC laptop to run Windows at home too?  Because they are bulky, slow, cheap plastic crap with short battery life for the same price as a MBP.

I built the first 6-core i7 Extreme a few years ago and put up with the huge and loud do-it-yourself box because that was the only way I could get the speed.  Now the Macbook Pro i7 4-core is just as fast but without the bulk, plastic, or noise.

I have every intention of getting the new Mac Pro to run Windows in Dec. as it's even faster, (I've been at the same speed now for 3 years,) and the bottom line is that I now need to run more servers in VMWARE Workstation at one time and can't on a laptop that only holds 16 GB RAM.  I need for my learning environment: Win2012 AD Domain Controller, SQL Server 2012, SharePoint 2013 App, SharePoint 2013 Web, etc.  I'm at 15.8 GB used right now with no room to grow.

The new Mac Pro looks awsome for running Windows fast, in my living room next to my recliner without the bulk or noise!

You missed my point, or, more likely, I failed to explain it.

Many businesses tend to standardise on equipment. It makes logistic and support tasks easier, and also gives you some extra flexibility - you can use same docking station for number of laptops (good for hotdesks) or you can easily remove HDD from otherwise dead machine, put it in same working machine and keep working... among other things.

Thus if they are already with Dell, HP or Lenovo... they are more likely to remain there.

And you can get decent workstations from either. Not as petit as new MB, but with some nice perks of their own - dual CPUs, more memory slots, more space for storage, easier to upgrade/expand graphics etc (boards in new MP look very custom).

(You can also get decent laptops on Windows side of equation these days, made of premium materials and with good battery life, if you want to spend money comparable to Apple counterparts, but I do agree that MBPs look really nice - even if they do run on higher end of temperature range, under load)

I did some reading on new MP. It is really clever design, but I cannot find info on some parts - for example, what is power supply in that box, and what power does high-end option of MP pull under full load (if anyone managed to come across such info, please share). If I'd have to preorder one of these with what I know so far, I admit I'd be a bit nervous. I'm not saying that it is impossible to achieve, but I do think that having all that powerful hardware running under full load for hours (or days) while remaining in safe thermal zone - and quiet fan - and not having to throttle down is one hell of an achievement, and not something easy to get.
post #103 of 281
Quote:
Originally Posted by nikon133 View Post


You missed my point, or, more likely, I failed to explain it.

Many businesses tend to standardise on equipment. It makes logistic and support tasks easier, and also gives you some extra flexibility - you can use same docking station for number of laptops (good for hotdesks) or you can easily remove HDD from otherwise dead machine, put it in same working machine and keep working... among other things.

Thus if they are already with Dell, HP or Lenovo... they are more likely to remain there.

And you can get decent workstations from either. Not as petit as new MB, but with some nice perks of their own - dual CPUs, more memory slots, more space for storage, easier to upgrade/expand graphics etc (boards in new MP look very custom).

(You can also get decent laptops on Windows side of equation these days, made of premium materials and with good battery life, if you want to spend money comparable to Apple counterparts, but I do agree that MBPs look really nice - even if they do run on higher end of temperature range, under load)

I did some reading on new MP. It is really clever design, but I cannot find info on some parts - for example, what is power supply in that box, and what power does high-end option of MP pull under full load (if anyone managed to come across such info, please share). If I'd have to preorder one of these with what I know so far, I admit I'd be a bit nervous. I'm not saying that it is impossible to achieve, but I do think that having all that powerful hardware running under full load for hours (or days) while remaining in safe thermal zone - and quiet fan - and not having to throttle down is one hell of an achievement, and not something easy to get.

The power supply is enough power for those processors, memory, but since it has no "SLOTS" or additional internal storage, it doesn't need HUGE power supplies.  so if you buy an external PCI chassis, storage system, that has it's own power supply depending on the model you buy, so that's how they can make the MacPro as small as they did with only one large fan and heat sink.

 

The XEON boxes that you see on the market have lots of PCI slots and room for internal drives, so they NEED LOTS of fans, water cooling, big power supplies, but Apple changed the game to make the basic box smaller, cheaper and still retain lots of expandability. 

 

I think the PC crowd is going to have to stick with very expensive, large, noisy and water cooled systems that need to get the fluids changed (what a hassle).    Oh well.

post #104 of 281
Quote:
Originally Posted by emacs72 View Post


Yes, that's why I figured the price differential (about $1000 or so) accounts for the unique architecture of the Mac Pro. Read the first two of my posts in this thread. I stated my assumptions therein.

I don't need to read anyone's ASSumptions.  You shouldn't have any assumptions.  Apple has a box that's just designed so radically different, users have to either adapt to how Apple is doing things, or if you want a XEON box, expect to pay more money for a larger box with lots of fans, possibly water cooling and big power supplies and have to get PCI slots for expensive memory, etc and probably might have to wait for someone else to adopt Thunderbolt 2 ports in a XEON configuration.  

 

Fast SSD is only available on PCI card slots right now and that's $1000 or more just for that.  

 

 

First things first, there is NO XEON motherboard that has Thunderbolt or Thunderbolt 2 ports.  Apple is it at this time.  

post #105 of 281
Quote:
Originally Posted by nikon133 View Post


Add motherboard, storage, power supply, case. Plus, "pro" grade graphics are usually more expensive than consumer/enthusiast parts based on same tech.

But in some scenarios this is irrelevant. If you are working in FCP or any other OSX-speciffic software, you simply need Mac.

On the other hand, if you are working in Windows environment, you will probably not be considering Macs in general.

Don't even bother trying to reason with someone that's trying to price out a comparable box. They don't exist.  There is NO XEON based motherboard that has Thunderbolt 2 ports on it.  All Thunderbolt 2 motherboards made by clone mfg are simply Haswell i5/i7 based chips, NOT XEON.  So there is absolutely NOTHING on the market from ANY PC or Clone mfg.  NOTHING.  ZERO, ZIP, NADA.

post #106 of 281

Just for fun, I tried to put something close to the base spec together from a single supplier, couldn't get it exact, but I think it'd be equivalent:

 

 

  • SilverStone TJ03S Silver Aluminium Mid Tower Case w/o PSU £142.84 inc VAT
  • 300GB OCZ Technology Z-Drive R4 CM84, Half Height PCIe SSD, PCIe 2.0 (x8), SandForce 2281, MLC-Flash, Read/Write 2GB/s £1786.96 inc VAT
  • Asus Z9PE-D8 WS, Intel C602, S 2011 x2, DDR3, SATA III - 6Gb/s, SATA RAID, PCIe 3.0 (x16), EEB Workstation Motherboard £435.12 inc VAT
  • 16GB (4x4GB) Hynix Server Memory, DDR3 PC3-12800 (1600MHz), 240 Pins, ECC, Registered, CAS 11-11-11 £209.93 inc VAT
  • Intel Xeon E5-1620, S2011, Quad Core, 3.6GHz, 10MB Smart Cache, 38x Bus/Core Ratio, 130W, OEM £229.33 inc VAT
  • 2 x 2GB AMD FirePro V7900, PCI-E 2.1 (x16), 256Bit GDDR5, 4x DisplayPort, Retail £1175.50 inc VAT
  • 1300W EVGA SuperNOVA G2 80PLUS Gold 90%+ Eff' Full Modular Power Supply £148.96 inc VAT

 

£4250...

 

Even if you swap out cheaper parts, at best you're still going to be looking at something in the ball-park of £2500, and even then you'd have no thunderbolt 2 etc

post #107 of 281
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stoobs View Post
 

Just for fun, I tried to put something close to the base spec together from a single supplier, couldn't get it exact, but I think it'd be equivalent:

 

 

  • SilverStone TJ03S Silver Aluminium Mid Tower Case w/o PSU £142.84 inc VAT
  • 300GB OCZ Technology Z-Drive R4 CM84, Half Height PCIe SSD, PCIe 2.0 (x8), SandForce 2281, MLC-Flash, Read/Write 2GB/s £1786.96 inc VAT
  • Asus Z9PE-D8 WS, Intel C602, S 2011 x2, DDR3, SATA III - 6Gb/s, SATA RAID, PCIe 3.0 (x16), EEB Workstation Motherboard £435.12 inc VAT
  • 16GB (4x4GB) Hynix Server Memory, DDR3 PC3-12800 (1600MHz), 240 Pins, ECC, Registered, CAS 11-11-11 £209.93 inc VAT
  • Intel Xeon E5-1620, S2011, Quad Core, 3.6GHz, 10MB Smart Cache, 38x Bus/Core Ratio, 130W, OEM £229.33 inc VAT
  • 2 x 2GB AMD FirePro V7900, PCI-E 2.1 (x16), 256Bit GDDR5, 4x DisplayPort, Retail £1175.50 inc VAT
  • 1300W EVGA SuperNOVA G2 80PLUS Gold 90%+ Eff' Full Modular Power Supply £148.96 inc VAT

 

£4250...

 

Even if you swap out cheaper parts, at best you're still going to be looking at something in the ball-park of £2500, and even then you'd have no thunderbolt 2 etc

Um.  This isn't a XEON/Thunderbolt 2 motherboard, so it's a FAIL. Sorry.  Plus, I'm not sure the box/PSU will support the configuration.

 

Your first mistake is using a NON-XEON/Thunderbolt 2 motherboard, which DO NOT exist.  So, any comparisons that ANYONE makes is NOT even close.  Sorry, but you just wasted your time and everyone else's.

 

Please, seriously, go to this site to see what motherboards are available and NOTICE that they are NOT XEON motherboards they are i5/i7 2nd, 3rd, or 4th gen but NOT XEON.  plus the only Thunderbolt 2 based motherboards are i5/i7 not XEON.

 

https://thunderbolttechnology.net/products

 

When configuring XEON boxes with multiple GPUs, fast SSD storage, etc., they have to make sure the power supply is big enough and that it has proper cooling, otherwise the box will shut down or have frequent component failure due to improper cooling or not a big enough power supply.

 

If you go to HP's site, in order to configure a box with multiple GPU cards with 6G or RAM, and a 8 core processor, I think they need upgraded power supplies and water cooling and those boxes start costing more like $10K or more.  Yeah, you get internal storage cages and PCI slots, but STILL no Thunderbolt (1 or 2) ports. So, at this point it's moot, nothing is comparable on the market.

post #108 of 281
Quote:
Originally Posted by drblank View Post
 

Apple has to look at next year's generation processors.  They might have to end up making a bigger box with a bigger fan/heatsink or a taller cylinder, so they have to design it based on what processors/GPUs they plan on using. It's not so simple as you want it to be, that's why they had to redesign the box specifically for the processor options.

 

In the old S-100 days, they had a back plane and you just swapped cards out, but those days are long gone.

 

Don't even think it's as easy as just swapping out guts out of a system.  It probably will never be that easy.

 

I guess you're right. I bought SGI workstations in the 90s, so this new Mac Pro is way more affordable than the prices SGI usually gave me, which were always shocking, specially when you wanted textured graphics (until they released the O2, when hardware textured graphics became affordable, at about $6000, and this is my favorite machine I've ever owned).

 

However, quite a few years have passed, and I don't see myself paying the same price of an O2, no matter how I loved the O2.

 

But... as others said... this new Mac Pro has one fan only... and this is very tempting for me, because I value quietness a lot.

 

Even if I'd like to be able to upgrade the Xeon in the future, and even if I don't need dual GPUs (just a good NVIDIA GPU would be fine for me), however, getting a powerful machine which is also very silent, is very tempting for me...

 

As I said before, I don't think I will buy it with just 4 cores... I think the Mac Pro becomes interesting for at least 6 cores.

post #109 of 281
Quote:
Originally Posted by Evilution View Post
 

I'm surprised it comes in a square box. I'd love to have seen it packaged in a cardboard tube, that'd have been quite neat.


Very risky during handling and transport. Imagine those tubes starting rolling after a bump ...

post #110 of 281
Quote:
Originally Posted by ecs View Post
 

 

I guess you're right. I bought SGI workstations in the 90s, so this new Mac Pro is way more affordable than the prices SGI usually gave me, which were always shocking, specially when you wanted textured graphics (until they released the O2, when hardware textured graphics became affordable, at about $6000, and this is my favorite machine I've ever owned).

 

However, quite a few years have passed, and I don't see myself paying the same price of an O2, no matter how I loved the O2.

 

But... as others said... this new Mac Pro has one fan only... and this is very tempting for me, because I value quietness a lot.

 

Even if I'd like to be able to upgrade the Xeon in the future, and even if I don't need dual GPUs (just a good NVIDIA GPU would be fine for me), however, getting a powerful machine which is also very silent, is very tempting for me...

 

As I said before, I don't think I will buy it with just 4 cores... I think the Mac Pro becomes interesting for at least 6 cores.

it all depends on what apps you are doing.  For some GPU is more important than CPU, for some its the other way around and for others, they just want the maximum they can get.

 

I really wish Apple would make a similar design but with i7 inside with optional high end GPUs and get the base system down around $2K or so.  I think that would make a compelling system for some.

post #111 of 281
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post

By the way I'm not saying the hardware isn't worth it in this model, frankly I haven't even looked closely. What I'm saying is that Apple needs a model that can sell in volume to assure the mac Pros future. A desktop machine that starts at $3000 is just stupid.

I'm kind of leaning towards your thoughts on this. Yes the MacPro is geared towards the professional community but it's the pro-sumer where Apple will ultimately make it's money from the MacPro's. We will have to see how well they sell before we really can start criticizing Apple for their entry price but I personally don't foresee these being hot items because of it. Not to say that the MacPro isn't a bucket full of coolness, it's defiantly on top of my wish list of ultimate computers to have not so much for it's speed, as faster computers can be had for less but the design, man that beautiful design and overall cool factor.

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post #112 of 281
Quote:
Originally Posted by drblank View Post
So, at this point it's moot, nothing is comparable on the market.

 

Oh gosh that simply isn't true, yes the MacPro is a feat of engineering to able to put a Xeon CPU, dual GPU and a PCIe SSD into such a small space, a super sexy space but building one of theses XEON systems is a very simple thing to do, not too expensive anymore. Using Amazon and starting with a Barebones system from SuperMicro, this includes everything except the CPU's, GPU's, HD's and memory, the fans (except CPU fans, you have to install those after the CPU, logically), cables, motherboard, case, power-supply come assembled and installed;

 

2X AMD FirePro W7000 4GB GDDR5 4DisplayPort PCI-Express Workstation Graphics

1X Supermicro SuperWorkstation SYS-7047A-T Dual LGA2011 Xeon 1200W Tower Server Barebone System  (dual CPU socket so you can add an extra later)

Intel Xeon Eight-Core E5-2650 2.0GHz 8.0GT/s 20MB LGA2011 Processor without Fan, Retail BX80621E52650 (8 core CPU and is faster than the one found in the 4,000 MacPro)

1X VisionTek Data Fusion 2-way PCIe SSD 480GB Small form factor - 100K IOPS Solid State Drive (900601) 

1X Kingston Technology  32GB Kit (4x8GB Modules) 1600MHz DDR3 PC3-12800 ECC Reg CL11 DIMM DR x4 Server and Motherboard Memory KVR16R11D4K4/32

 

Total Price: 4,035

 

I built one to compare with the 4,000 MacPro but as you can see it has a faster CPU, a dual socket motherboard so I can add an additional one later (when second CPU is added it will be faster than the MacPro 12 Core version), faster graphic cards with more memory, I can even add additional graphics cards for a total of 5(example; 2 ATI Crossfired and three Nvidia Tesla cards), a Supermicro barebones system so all you need to do is install the GPU, CPU, SSD and RAMS and then your off. I wouldn't use Windows 8 but CentOS (Linux64) which SuperMicro includes with the box and all components that I have selected have been tested with SuperMicro to work with the system.

 

Now it doesn't have a Thunderport port but if you really need one than Intel is starting to produce PCIe expansions cards, Asus has just introduced one and when Thunderport 2 is released I'm sure a new expansion card will be available shortly after for that as well. Not sure what you would use it for as this case has room for a 8 disk RAID and since we are using a PCIe SSD card, 4 more normal SSD drives.

 

Yes the thing is huge but it's meant to be used as a work machine and who cares what it looks like when it will sit under the desk, the SuperMicro is also ultra quiet, not sure what it would sound like if you added 5 GPU's though, wouldn't mind finding out though.

 

Ugly as sin but damn if 5 GPU's ain't sexy!

 

Now I'm not saying the MacPro isn't the coolest computer out there because it is but it is not the cheapest, the fastest or best overall, compromises will have to be made for using the MacPro. The biggest beeing, for me anyway, is you will be stuck with the configuration you make upon purchase for a very long time where as the monster above can grow with your needs. Just putting things in prospective here, the fact that the MacPro is an Apple is probably more than enough for most people so who cares. Yes, you can run OSX if you so desired on the machine above but I don't know about the 5 GPU's.

 

Just out of curiosity, why all the hubbub about Thunderport. I keep reading above, yea but it doesn't have Thunderport so your XEON configurations are a mute point, this and that, why. Okay yes, with the MacPro I fully understand, you don't have any internal expansion so you have nothing else but with a normal XEON desktop you do. I know Black Magicdesign has a really cool capture box but they also make a PCIe version and I could always buy a Thunderport card for my XEON workstation later if I will probably never need/want one. I personally use a NAS drive for my external storage needs, I do have 2 TB eSata/USB 3.0 drive for my portable needs but isn't eSata good enough for that? Monitors, HDMI and DisplayPort seem to working pretty good. I don't know, can someone explain why I would need it?


Edited by Relic - 10/23/13 at 5:18am
When I looked up "Ninjas" in Thesaurus.com, it said "Ninja's can't be found" Well played Ninjas, well played.
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post #113 of 281
Quote:
Originally Posted by Relic View Post
 

 

Oh gosh that simply isn't true, yes the MacPro is a feat of engineering to able to put a Xeon CPU, dual GPU and a PCIe SSD into such a small space, a super sexy space but building one of theses XEON systems is a very simple thing to do and not magic. Using Amazon;

 

2X AMD FirePro W7000 4GB GDDR5 4DisplayPort PCI-Express Workstation Graphics

1X Supermicro SuperWorkstation SYS-7047A-T Dual LGA2011 Xeon 1200W Tower Server Barebone System  (dual CPU socket so you can add an extra later)

Intel Xeon Eight-Core E5-2650 2.0GHz 8.0GT/s 20MB LGA2011 Processor without Fan, Retail BX80621E52650 (8 core CPU and is faster than the one found in the 4,000 MacPro)

1X VisionTek Data Fusion 2-way PCIe SSD 480GB Small form factor - 100K IOPS Solid State Drive (900601) 

1X Kingston Technology  32GB Kit (4x8GB Modules) 1600MHz DDR3 PC3-12800 ECC Reg CL11 DIMM DR x4 Server and Motherboard Memory KVR16R11D4K4/32

 

Total Price: 4,035

 

I built one to compare with the 4,000 MacPro but as you can see it has a faster CPU, a dual socket motherboard so I can add an additional one later (when second CPU is added it will be faster than the MacPro 12 Core version), faster graphic cards with more memory, I can even add additional graphics cards for a total of 5(example; 2 ATI Crossfired and three Nvidia Tesla cards), a Supermicro barebones system so all you need to do is install the GPU, CPU, SSD and RAMS and then your off. I wouldn't use Windows 8 but CentOS (Linux64) which SuperMicro includes with the box and all components that I have selected have been tested with SuperMicro to work with the system.

 

Now it doesn't have a Thunderport port but if you really need one than Intel is starting to produce PCIe expansions cards, Asus has just introduced one and when Thunderport 2 is released I'm sure a new expansion card will be available shortly after for that as well. Not sure what you would use it for as this case has room for a 8 disk RAID and since we are using a PCIe SSD card, 4 more normal SSD drives.

 

Yes the thing is huge but it's meant to be used as a work machine and who cares what it looks like when it will sit under the desk, the SuperMicro is also ultra quiet, not sure what it would sound like if you added 5 GPU's though, wouldn't mind finding out though.

No one said anything about using Magic. 


Sorry, but this POS system you hodge podged together is just a clone box and you don't have any single phone number to use for tech support.  All of the repairs you have to do yourself, which you aren't factoring in, you have a box that doesn't have Thunderbolt 2 ports and doesn't legally run OS X.  So just STOP IT.

 

 

It states in this recent article that there is no finalized Thunderbolt 2 PCI card slot specs from Intel and the ASUS card you spoke of hasn't been released to the market.  obviously, this is based on an article dated August 2013 and I don't see any such card on ASUS' site and the ThunderboltEX PCIe is only a Thunderbolt 1, not Thunderbolt 2 card.  No price either.

 

 

http://vr-zone.com/articles/thunderbolts-great-pcie-hope/50677.html

post #114 of 281
Quote:
Originally Posted by Relic View Post
 

 

Oh gosh that simply isn't true, yes the MacPro is a feat of engineering to able to put a Xeon CPU, dual GPU and a PCIe SSD into such a small space, a super sexy space but building one of theses XEON systems is a very simple thing to do, not too expensive anymore. Using Amazon and starting with a Barebones system from SuperMicro, this includes everything except the CPU's, GPU's, HD's and memory, the fans (except CPU fans, you have to install those after the CPU, logically), cables, motherboard, case, power-supply come assembled and installed;

 

2X AMD FirePro W7000 4GB GDDR5 4DisplayPort PCI-Express Workstation Graphics

1X Supermicro SuperWorkstation SYS-7047A-T Dual LGA2011 Xeon 1200W Tower Server Barebone System  (dual CPU socket so you can add an extra later)

Intel Xeon Eight-Core E5-2650 2.0GHz 8.0GT/s 20MB LGA2011 Processor without Fan, Retail BX80621E52650 (8 core CPU and is faster than the one found in the 4,000 MacPro)

1X VisionTek Data Fusion 2-way PCIe SSD 480GB Small form factor - 100K IOPS Solid State Drive (900601) 

1X Kingston Technology  32GB Kit (4x8GB Modules) 1600MHz DDR3 PC3-12800 ECC Reg CL11 DIMM DR x4 Server and Motherboard Memory KVR16R11D4K4/32

 

Total Price: 4,035

 

I built one to compare with the 4,000 MacPro but as you can see it has a faster CPU, a dual socket motherboard so I can add an additional one later (when second CPU is added it will be faster than the MacPro 12 Core version), faster graphic cards with more memory, I can even add additional graphics cards for a total of 5(example; 2 ATI Crossfired and three Nvidia Tesla cards), a Supermicro barebones system so all you need to do is install the GPU, CPU, SSD and RAMS and then your off. I wouldn't use Windows 8 but CentOS (Linux64) which SuperMicro includes with the box and all components that I have selected have been tested with SuperMicro to work with the system.

 

Now it doesn't have a Thunderport port but if you really need one than Intel is starting to produce PCIe expansions cards, Asus has just introduced one and when Thunderport 2 is released I'm sure a new expansion card will be available shortly after for that as well. Not sure what you would use it for as this case has room for a 8 disk RAID and since we are using a PCIe SSD card, 4 more normal SSD drives.

 

Yes the thing is huge but it's meant to be used as a work machine and who cares what it looks like when it will sit under the desk, the SuperMicro is also ultra quiet, not sure what it would sound like if you added 5 GPU's though, wouldn't mind finding out though.

 

Ugly as sin but damn if 5 GPU's ain't sexy!

 

Now I'm not saying the MacPro isn't the coolest computer out there because it is but it is not the cheapest, the fastest or best overall, compromises will have to be made for using the MacPro. The biggest beeing, for me anyway, is you will be stuck with the configuration you make upon purchase for a very long time where as the monster above can grow with your needs. Just putting things in prospective here, the fact that the MacPro is an Apple is probably more than enough for most people so who cares. Yes, you can run OSX if you so desired on the machine above but I don't know about the 5 GPU's.

 

Just out of curiosity, why all the hubbub about Thunderport. I keep reading above, yea but it doesn't have Thunderport so your XEON configurations are a mute point, this and that, why. Okay yes, with the MacPro I fully understand, you don't have any internal expansion so you have nothing else but with a normal XEON desktop you do. I know Black Magicdesign has a really cool capture box but they also make a PCIe version and I could always buy a Thunderport card for my XEON workstation later if I really need one but I'll never need 8 ports. I personally use a NAS drive for my external storage needs, I do have 2 TB eSata/USB 3.0 drive for my portable needs but isn't eSata good enough for that? Monitors, HDMI and DisplayPort seem to working pretty good. I don't know, can someone explain why I would need it?

 

Whatever Relic.  You seem to not like Apple hardware, so GO AWAY.  

 

Seriously, people that buy Apple products like them because they don't want to use a PC or a PC clone with Hackintosh BS because they want to get a computer that's got good support and has good resale value and only want one place to call and they don't have time to mess around trying to figure out what BS clone parts to order.  Too much room for problems.

 

You just seem to want to put together a hobby computer that just wastes a LOT of time in trying to figure out what to buy, put together and support when it's so much easier and cheaper in the long run to just by a name brand product.

 

Good you like making simple things complicated.

post #115 of 281
Quote:
Originally Posted by drblank View Post
 

No one said anything about using Magic. 


Sorry, but this POS system you hodge podged together is just a clone box and you don't have any single phone number to use for tech support.  All of the repairs you have to do yourself, which you aren't factoring in, you have a box that doesn't have Thunderbolt 2 ports and doesn't legally run OS X.  So just STOP IT.

 

 

It states in this recent article that there is no finalized Thunderbolt 2 PCI card slot specs from Intel and the ASUS card you spoke of hasn't been released to the market.  obviously, this is based on an article dated August 2013 and I don't see any such card on ASUS' site and the ThunderboltEX PCIe is only a Thunderbolt 1, not Thunderbolt 2 card.  No price either.

 

 

http://vr-zone.com/articles/thunderbolts-great-pcie-hope/50677.html

Supermicro is a rinky dink little company that doesn't do anything other than making more BS me too PC clones.  BFD.  Too many of those players that can't seem to figure out how to make a decent profit margin.

 

They have the same disease as all of the other PC mfg, too many products and little to no profits.

 

They'll all end up doing what IBM and Compaq and others have done. Sell off their pathetic business to some IDIOT company that's stupid enough to buy them.

post #116 of 281
Quote:
Originally Posted by Relic View Post
 

 

Oh gosh that simply isn't true, yes the MacPro is a feat of engineering to able to put a Xeon CPU, dual GPU and a PCIe SSD into such a small space, a super sexy space but building one of theses XEON systems is a very simple thing to do, not too expensive anymore. Using Amazon and starting with a Barebones system from SuperMicro, this includes everything except the CPU's, GPU's, HD's and memory, the fans (except CPU fans, you have to install those after the CPU, logically), cables, motherboard, case, power-supply come assembled and installed;

 

2X AMD FirePro W7000 4GB GDDR5 4DisplayPort PCI-Express Workstation Graphics

1X Supermicro SuperWorkstation SYS-7047A-T Dual LGA2011 Xeon 1200W Tower Server Barebone System  (dual CPU socket so you can add an extra later)

Intel Xeon Eight-Core E5-2650 2.0GHz 8.0GT/s 20MB LGA2011 Processor without Fan, Retail BX80621E52650 (8 core CPU and is faster than the one found in the 4,000 MacPro)

1X VisionTek Data Fusion 2-way PCIe SSD 480GB Small form factor - 100K IOPS Solid State Drive (900601) 

1X Kingston Technology  32GB Kit (4x8GB Modules) 1600MHz DDR3 PC3-12800 ECC Reg CL11 DIMM DR x4 Server and Motherboard Memory KVR16R11D4K4/32

 

Total Price: 4,035

 

I built one to compare with the 4,000 MacPro but as you can see it has a faster CPU, a dual socket motherboard so I can add an additional one later (when second CPU is added it will be faster than the MacPro 12 Core version), faster graphic cards with more memory, I can even add additional graphics cards for a total of 5(example; 2 ATI Crossfired and three Nvidia Tesla cards), a Supermicro barebones system so all you need to do is install the GPU, CPU, SSD and RAMS and then your off. I wouldn't use Windows 8 but CentOS (Linux64) which SuperMicro includes with the box and all components that I have selected have been tested with SuperMicro to work with the system.

 

Now it doesn't have a Thunderport port but if you really need one than Intel is starting to produce PCIe expansions cards, Asus has just introduced one and when Thunderport 2 is released I'm sure a new expansion card will be available shortly after for that as well. Not sure what you would use it for as this case has room for a 8 disk RAID and since we are using a PCIe SSD card, 4 more normal SSD drives.

 

Yes the thing is huge but it's meant to be used as a work machine and who cares what it looks like when it will sit under the desk, the SuperMicro is also ultra quiet, not sure what it would sound like if you added 5 GPU's though, wouldn't mind finding out though.

 

Ugly as sin but damn if 5 GPU's ain't sexy!

 

Now I'm not saying the MacPro isn't the coolest computer out there because it is but it is not the cheapest, the fastest or best overall, compromises will have to be made for using the MacPro. The biggest beeing, for me anyway, is you will be stuck with the configuration you make upon purchase for a very long time where as the monster above can grow with your needs. Just putting things in prospective here, the fact that the MacPro is an Apple is probably more than enough for most people so who cares. Yes, you can run OSX if you so desired on the machine above but I don't know about the 5 GPU's.

 

Just out of curiosity, why all the hubbub about Thunderport. I keep reading above, yea but it doesn't have Thunderport so your XEON configurations are a mute point, this and that, why. Okay yes, with the MacPro I fully understand, you don't have any internal expansion so you have nothing else but with a normal XEON desktop you do. I know Black Magicdesign has a really cool capture box but they also make a PCIe version and I could always buy a Thunderport card for my XEON workstation later if I will probably never need/want one. I personally use a NAS drive for my external storage needs, I do have 2 TB eSata/USB 3.0 drive for my portable needs but isn't eSata good enough for that? Monitors, HDMI and DisplayPort seem to working pretty good. I don't know, can someone explain why I would need it?

If you start adding these so-called Thunderbolt PCI cards, which don't exist, then you won't have any room for all of these GPUs you can't add.  Ooops.

 

I think Thunderbolt 2 ports will be used just to connect a monitor to them, so that would take two ports. 

 

I don't know why people will need 6 Thunderbolt 2 ports, but maybe we'll find out sometime after the boxes start shipping when the 3rd parties start announcing Thunderbolt 2 products.  Who knows what's up people sleeves.  For all we know, there might be external chassis that require 2 ports.  Anything is possible, so we'll see what happens.


in the mean time, please stop your ridiculous attempts to try to figure out a clone box in place of a MacPro.  There are lots of folks that won't even LOOK at a PC clone box for a variety of reasons, so please don't put out misleading BS just to try to act like you know what you are talking about.

 

Your first mistake was to try to compare an Apple product to some hodge podge clone box. the only people that do that are dishonest people that don't respect companies like Apple.  Professionals don't like running Hackintosh systems due to the lack of support, wasting time throwing together something just to save a couple of dollars.


OS X users are just going to pick the best Apple product and Windows/Linux users will just pick what's the best of the box to run their OS and only IDIOTS use Hackintosh systems.    Those people are dishonest trolls that don't respect the companies that design and make the products they use.

post #117 of 281
Quote:
Originally Posted by drblank View Post
 

 

Whatever Relic.  You seem to not like Apple hardware, so GO AWAY.  

 

You are getting the Troll for the Day award.


Seriously, people that buy Apple products like them because they don't want to use a PC or a PC clone with Hackintosh BS because they want to get a computer that's got good support and has good resale value and only want one place to call and they don't have time to mess around trying to figure out what BS clone parts to order.  Too much room for problems.

 

You just seem to want to put together a hobby computer that just wastes a LOT of time in trying to figure out what to buy, put together and support when it's so much easier and cheaper in the long run to just by a name brand product.

 

Good you like making simple things complicated.  Typical IDIOT mentality.

 

Again, you don't THINK, you just try to make yourself look like an expert when all you are is some geek with nothing better to do by annoy people with BS solutions.

Like always you fail to grasp the concept of a conversation and take everything personally. and talk down to anyone who has an opinion that isn't your one. I never said I didn't like the MacPro, just the opposite, I like it a lot. I was responding to your misguided information that the MacPro specs couldn't be had outside of an Apple machine for the same price. SuperMicro by the way offers superb support for their machines, including their barebones, tech support and on-site services (1 year is included with purchase by the way) are available, that's why I used them as a starting point. The Asus card will be available by the time the MacPro is, it's a new product, what's your point?

When I looked up "Ninjas" in Thesaurus.com, it said "Ninja's can't be found" Well played Ninjas, well played.
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post #118 of 281
Quote:
Originally Posted by Relic View Post
 

Like always you fail to grasp the concept of a conversation and take everything personally. and talk down to anyone who has an opinion that isn't your one. I never said I didn't like the MacPro, just the opposite, I like it a lot. I was responding to your misguided information that the MacPro specs couldn't be had outside of an Apple machine for the same price. SuperMicro by the way offers superb support for their machines, including their barebones, tech support and on-site services (1 year is included with purchase by the way) are available, that's why I used them as a starting point. The Asus card will be available by the time the MacPro is, it's a new product, what's your point?

You fail to realize that I don't care about this non-supported product because it doesn't run OS X legally.  So it isn't a conversation that is worthwhile.  YOU just wasted MY time and you should just STOP while your behind.

 

You waste people's time Relic.  PERIOD.

They can't be done at this time.  AGAIN, there is NO computer that runs OS X legally and fully supported that isn't made by Apple.

 

SuperMicro doesn't support OS X.

post #119 of 281
Quote:
Originally Posted by drblank View Post
 

If you start adding these so-called Thunderbolt PCI cards, which don't exist, then you won't have any room for all of these GPUs you can't add.  Ooops.

 

They do exist and will be offered soon, okay so in the highly unlikely scenario that I'll need a Thunderbolt then I will only be able to use 4 GPU's, I think I can manage.

When I looked up "Ninjas" in Thesaurus.com, it said "Ninja's can't be found" Well played Ninjas, well played.
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post #120 of 281
Quote:
Originally Posted by Relic View Post
 

Like always you fail to grasp the concept of a conversation and take everything personally. and talk down to anyone who has an opinion that isn't your one. I never said I didn't like the MacPro, just the opposite, I like it a lot. I was responding to your misguided information that the MacPro specs couldn't be had outside of an Apple machine for the same price. SuperMicro by the way offers superb support for their machines, including their barebones, tech support and on-site services (1 year is included with purchase by the way) are available, that's why I used them as a starting point. The Asus card will be available by the time the MacPro is, it's a new product, what's your point?

I grasp what you are trying to do and all it's doing is WASTING MY TIME AND INSULTING MY INTELLIGENCE.

 

You are trying to throw together a system that doesn't do what the MacPro does.

 

If you want to use OS X in a fully LEGAL and FULLY SUPPORTED Professional workstation, it's the MacPro system.  NOT SOME POS clone box with parts by different companies that don't run OS X legally or supported.

 

Supermicro doesn't make Thunderbolt 2 PCI card slots.  Does Supermicro support cards they don't sell or make?  Probably not.

 

Again, STOP YOUR BS.   I'm not invested in some PIECE OF GARBAGE clone box that doesn't LEGALLY run OS X or is NOT supported by Apple.

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