or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › Software › Mac OS X › Mac owners adopting OS X Mavericks 3X faster than Mountain Lion
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Mac owners adopting OS X Mavericks 3X faster than Mountain Lion

post #1 of 96
Thread Starter 
Just 24 hours after launch, the newest revision of Apple's desktop operating system is responsible for 5.5 percent of all North American web traffic originating from Macs, a new study says.

Mavericks adoption stats


Online advertising network Chitika, who also tracked adoption of OS X Mountain Lion after its release last year, said that Mavericks adoption "significantly outpaces" that of its feline sibling at the same point. Mountain Lion, released last summer, took four days to reach the 5.5 percent threshold, according to the company's measurements.

Chitika speculates that Apple's decision to make Mavericks a free upgrade for Mac owners -- as opposed to Mountain Lion's $19.99 price tag -- is the primary driver behind its quick uptake.

"With these results in mind, it's evident that at least on the OS front, Apple's free desktop software strategy is paying dividends from an adoption standpoint," the company wrote in a blog post Thursday.

Another factor working in Mavericks's favor is its prominent placement as an available update in the Mac App Store, complete with a badge on the store's dock icon and a notification in Notification Center. Previous versions of OS X delivered through the store were not shown as updates; users were required to specifically navigate to and purchase the upgrades.

Mavericks, available to 2007 or newer Macs running Snow Leopard, Lion, or Mountain Lion, is a significant update to Apple's desktop operating system. The update brings deep architectural enhancements that wring even more battery life out of Apple's laptops, enhanced support for multiple displays, an updated to the Safari web browser, new iCloud Keychain functionality, a new tabbed mode for Finder, and desktop versions of iOS's Maps and iBooks.

The adoption numbers are generated by sampling "millions" of advertising impressions from the United States and Canada through Chitika's advertising network.
post #2 of 96

“Apple never would have sold any at all. Good thing they made it free.”

post #3 of 96
I can't help but wonder why they are offering a major upgrade for free and covering so many model's over so many model years.

Not making paranoid accusations, just seems a little odd.
Life is not measured by the breaths you take, but the moments that take your breath away. - GC
Reply
Life is not measured by the breaths you take, but the moments that take your breath away. - GC
Reply
post #4 of 96
To spirt sales in floundering Mac business, of course.
post #5 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by DGNR8 View Post

I can't help but wonder why they are offering a major upgrade for free and covering so many model's over so many model years.

Not making paranoid accusations, just seems a little odd.

Why wouldn't they? In general Apple has covered as many models, as many years back as is possible. It is good for Apple and good for the customers.
post #6 of 96

Can a developer point out any modifications in the underlying code that would make Apple want to push this on just about every Intel based Mac out there?

 

I felt the same way when they put out iOS 7 working all the way back to iPhone 4, which I can attest is terrible.

Life is not measured by the breaths you take, but the moments that take your breath away. - GC
Reply
Life is not measured by the breaths you take, but the moments that take your breath away. - GC
Reply
post #7 of 96

On models that are 7 years old?

Life is not measured by the breaths you take, but the moments that take your breath away. - GC
Reply
Life is not measured by the breaths you take, but the moments that take your breath away. - GC
Reply
post #8 of 96

It gives them a huge edge against Microsoft. They can boast quicker adoption rates, and can also significantly boost their installation base against Windows, not to mention consolidate it. It's also a great marketing ploy to show businesses how 6-year old computers can still be of use to help stave off equipment purchases to stretch budgets. It's a win-win for everyone. Windows dominates the installation base globally, but if you look at the numbers it's all because of outdated software. Almost half of which XP is responsible for, yet MS doesn't even support it any longer!

post #9 of 96

"Chitika speculates that Apple's decision to make Mavericks a free upgrade" may be why?

 

DUH!!!!!!!

{2010 Mac Pro-6 core 3.33-12gb 1333 ram-ati5870-velociraptor 600's-SL/win7/64-Konnekt Live/Onkyo-Dell3007wfp}
{2008 Mac Pro-8 core 3.2's-16GB-evga285} {MBP17}{ipad}{iphone 4 blk16gb}
Reply
{2010 Mac Pro-6 core 3.33-12gb 1333 ram-ati5870-velociraptor 600's-SL/win7/64-Konnekt Live/Onkyo-Dell3007wfp}
{2008 Mac Pro-8 core 3.2's-16GB-evga285} {MBP17}{ipad}{iphone 4 blk16gb}
Reply
post #10 of 96
Whomever predicted this move is a genius ;-)
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
Reply
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
Reply
post #11 of 96

"Windows dominates the installation base globally, but if you look at the numbers it's all because of outdated software."

 

Were purchasing Brand New outdated MB/Processors/Memory for WIN XP so we can have 10 back up PC's for our Plotter/CAD PC's because we do not want to spend 3 Grand per PC to upgrade the software.

 

$450.00 PC hard ware  

$4500.00 Total

 

$3000.00 New License + $800 New Hardware with WIN 7 or WIN 8.1 for 6 PC's

$22,800.00 Total

Life is not measured by the breaths you take, but the moments that take your breath away. - GC
Reply
Life is not measured by the breaths you take, but the moments that take your breath away. - GC
Reply
post #12 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by DGNR8 View Post

I can't help but wonder why they are offering a major upgrade for free and covering so many model's over so many model years.

Not making paranoid accusations, just seems a little odd.
Couple of points off the top of my head.

They have a large proportion of their Mac base still on snow leopard and cannot justify cutting security update support for it, so any incentive to get people off of it is a huge benefit to Apple.

The money they were making on the sale of OS X etc is peanuts compared to the profit of selling the computers in the first place, happy customers are repeat customers.
iPad, Macbook Pro, iPhone, heck I even have iLife! :-)
Reply
iPad, Macbook Pro, iPhone, heck I even have iLife! :-)
Reply
post #13 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by DGNR8 View Post

I can't help but wonder why they are offering a major upgrade for free and covering so many model's over so many model years.

Not making paranoid accusations, just seems a little odd.

I think Apple had the time and felt it was time for a 'tidy up'. There was a big 'clean up' across all their apps, both in OSX and IOS. To make the apps and the OS environments all work together it made sense to roll out the changes to an as broad a base as possible. I think they went beyond what was required but who's complaining?

post #14 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by DGNR8 View Post

I can't help but wonder why they are offering a major upgrade for free and covering so many model's over so many model years.

Not making paranoid accusations, just seems a little odd.

Apple has been doing free system upgrades for iOS for years so it seems perfectly reasonable that OS X upgrades would be as well.  I think expectations have changed; there would be grumbling if it weren't free.  Also, as someone else pointed out the free system upgrade is akin to a stock buyback in terms of returning value to stakeholders (in this case existing customers).

 

Are there any horror stories yet about upgrading to Mavericks?  How risky is being an early adopter this time around?

post #15 of 96
Yeah... Cuz it's free. Rocket science? Don't think so.
post #16 of 96
dgnr8 - It is more work for developers to support older platforms. Usually when a developer wants to support a new OS feature, they think seriously about dropping support for older platforms. If the OS is free, more people will upgrade and more people will buy from the Apple Store. That makes more money for Apple. Apple doesn't need to worry about pushing security updates out to older platforms or other legacy support issues that slows Microsoft's development pace. Both Apple and third party developers can advance their apps more rapidly allowing everyone in the Apple market to be more competitive and drive higher Mac adoption.
post #17 of 96

Have been using Mac and apple equipment at home since 1986. Always had PCs at work. My home equipment was always better than my work equipment. Mavericks OS is the best I have worked with!

post #18 of 96

1. It's the absolute finest iteration of OS X.

 

2. It's free (but, say, 29 bucks is barely the price of a meal for two, and you would have gotten an entire OS for it.)

 

3. It runs on hardware going back to 2007. For instance, it runs very well on my early 2008 Macbook Pro 2.4Ghz with 6GB RAM. 

 

All in all, as close to perfect as an OS X release can get. 

post #19 of 96

Of course the new OSX is being adopted more quickly.  Free is always the best price.

 

But it would have sold fine.  Every single iteration of OSX has sold fine.

 

There has never been a poorly selling version of OS X.  

 

If this one is free, that's due to a strategic decision by Apple.

post #20 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by DGNR8 View Post
 

On models that are 7 years old?

Doesn't it run on the same models that Mountain Lion runs on? The number of years is not a factor. It is just models with 64 bit kernel capabilities. Eventually some older 64 bit kernel machines might get EOL'd by some other hardware issue like the graphics adapter.

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

Reply

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

Reply
post #21 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by Noicc1138 View Post

To spirt sales in floundering Mac business, of course.

 

 

All "PCs" across the board are in decline. It's market wide. Apple has historically managed to *still* outpace the industry, though. 

 

Except now there's the phenomenon called iPad. I doubt Apple minds its role as a Mac successor in some key ways. 

 

Additionally, decline or not, Apple has dominated PC Consumer Satisfaction ratings for just about a decade now, often by a wide margin. So if someone *does* have $1000+ to shell out for computer, Macs are still the cream of the consumer computing segment.

post #22 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by DGNR8 View Post

I can't help but wonder why they are offering a major upgrade for free and covering so many model's over so many model years.

Not making paranoid accusations, just seems a little odd.

Why would they not and what exactly is odd about it? Your post is more odd than anything.

post #23 of 96

According to this, 10.8 was responsible for about 0.2% of web traffic prior to launch, and 10.9 showed a similar (but uneven) pattern. I somehow doubt that Apple's internal testing makes up 0.2% of North American web usage, so what's going on there?

post #24 of 96

It's running just fine on my 2010 iMac here, upgraded direct from a positively ancient 10.6.8 install.

 

It's a big change to the workflow overall going from 10.6 to 10.9 (almost all good, I might add), but more importantly I've noticed a number of performance improvements right off the bat, in particular with CPU usage in Logic Pro...

 

As for why they'd do this for free, and for so far back, I think they're really pushing hard to consolidate the current OS's (both OSX and iOS) onto a greater share of the installed base. That benefits them and their developers (and the user base!) in countless ways.

 

The fact is, there is almost NO compelling reason not to upgrade. Most of my existing software just works, and I had only a few apps that needed updates (e.g. Ableton Live 8 needed a minor update to make ReWire compatible) but all were minor. So far, everything is functioning more smoothly, the new apps are great (although I don't have a 'new' device, I was given a free upgrade to iWork, presumably because I owned an older version already?). Overall there are tons of good reasons to upgrade, not the least of which is, it's free. 

post #25 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by DGNR8 View Post

I can't help but wonder why they are offering a major upgrade for free and covering so many model's over so many model years.

Not making paranoid accusations, just seems a little odd.

Nothing odd about it. Apple loves to satisfy its customers. They dropped upgrades from $130 to $30 to $20 to free. Again hardware subsidizes the software.

Who knew that "free" sells!
post #26 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by DGNR8 View Post
 

Can a developer point out any modifications in the underlying code that would make Apple want to push this on just about every Intel based Mac out there?

 

I felt the same way when they put out iOS 7 working all the way back to iPhone 4, which I can attest is terrible.

Umm,, i have an iPhone 4 with iOS 7 and I wouldn't say it's terrible.  I like some of the new features, so it's all subjective.


But, it's a wise move to get users to the latest version OS for a LOT of reasons.  If the hardware can run it, then it makes a lot of sense since there are features with iOS and OS X that leverage one another, so it makes sense from that standpoint.  The sooner they can get all of the users to the latest OS, the less support costs for Apple, which is a good thing.  Plus their s/w developers can focus on what's current and what the next release will be rather than having people still writing code for an OS that's 3 or 4 revs ago.  Development of OSs is speeding up and this is a perfect way to keep the majority of users current.

 

Microsoft wanted to can XP as soon as Windows 7 came out, but they couldn't.  Too many users bitching and complaining about having to upgrade because of the expense of new computers/s/w.  Making the OS free is great for everyone.  IF Apple wanted to be greedy, they could have given it free for those with AppleCare support contracts, but they decided it should be free.

 

Apple has about a 3 year lifespan on smartphones and iPads, TYPICALLY, and they feel that a product should have 3 OS updates, which is TOTALLY reasonable, otherwise, everyone with an iPhone 4 would have to be forced to buy a new smartphone to get a later OS.

post #27 of 96

I updated two macbook pro's and one mini....

 

So far, so good...;)

post #28 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by DGNR8 View Post
 

Can a developer point out any modifications in the underlying code that would make Apple want to push this on just about every Intel based Mac out there?

Better battery life for all laptop users? Why would they not want to push it out to all x86_64 Intel-based Macs? Your questions make no sense and smack of troll baiting.

post #29 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by DarkLite View Post

I somehow doubt that Apple's internal testing makes up 0.2% of North American web usage, so what's going on there?

Developers running the DP versions would be my guess.... "launch" in this case is the public launch that we saw on Tuesday but the developer previews are generally available for a good few months before that and there are quite a few Mac developers around who would be running the DPs.
post #30 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by malax View Post
 

Apple has been doing free system upgrades for iOS for years so it seems perfectly reasonable that OS X upgrades would be as well.  I think expectations have changed; there would be grumbling if it weren't free.  Also, as someone else pointed out the free system upgrade is akin to a stock buyback in terms of returning value to stakeholders (in this case existing customers).

 

Are there any horror stories yet about upgrading to Mavericks?  How risky is being an early adopter this time around?

I just got a warning email from my university IT that EndNote and Office 2011 don't like Mavericks. Though in typical IT fashion they blamed the OS and not the software manuf. that need to adapt to the new OS reality….

post #31 of 96

It's in the works... Terminals that have no dedicated users that require iTunes accounts to update iLife and iWork.

post #32 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeJones View Post
 

Better battery life for all laptop users? Why would they not want to push it out to all x86_64 Intel-based Macs? Your questions make no sense and smack of troll baiting.

I asked a simple question without taking a single swipe at Apple or anyone else, and I am troll baiting?

 

That is why I don't post on forums much, because of responses like yours.

 

There are to many self righteous condescending jack wads in here that that are so quick to accuse people of things that are just not true.

 

Jeezzzzz…..

Life is not measured by the breaths you take, but the moments that take your breath away. - GC
Reply
Life is not measured by the breaths you take, but the moments that take your breath away. - GC
Reply
post #33 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by malax View Post

Are there any horror stories yet about upgrading to Mavericks?  How risky is being an early adopter this time around?

Seems solid on my Mid 2011 mac mini so far after upgrading from Mountain Lion, although I've not really had a chance to push it that hard yet... can't wait to try it on my new 13" rMBP which is currently showing as "Preparing for Dispatch" with a delivery date of next Tuesday 1biggrin.gif
post #34 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post


Additionally, decline or not, Apple has dominated PC Consumer Satisfaction ratings for just about a decade now, often by a wide margin.
I am not attacking Mac. I love Mac. It's just the truth. Mac sales are sinking. Apple is pulling out all stops to spirt sales. (Lowering price on MacBook retina too) The free update will maybe get iPad people to use their Macs again. Hopefully, when they use it more, maybe they'll buy a new one.
post #35 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by DGNR8 View Post

Can a developer point out any modifications in the underlying code that would make Apple want to push this on just about every Intel based Mac out there?

My thought is the way Mavericks sandboxes apps limiting what apps can and can't do to other parts of the system once installed. This is one way to control malicious code in an app or a webpage. There are numerous other security improvements as well.

Another thought is iCloud and integration between desktop/laptop with your mobile devices. This ensures no one is left out.
post #36 of 96
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post
 It runs on hardware going back to 2007.

 

It doesn't run on my 2007年 MacBook :embarrass.

post #37 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by TokyoJimu View Post
 

 

It doesn't run on my 2007年 MacBook :embarrass.

 

Yeah, the MacBook was a little underpowered for what they are doing now.  if they are going back to some of the higher end 2007 models, that's actually pretty good they can still do that.  But for the low end MacBooks, I can understand why they can't.  MacBooks were entry level laptops and to still have a 6 going on 7 year old entry level laptop is actually pretty long life. 

 

Typically the lifespan of a computer for it's useful life is around 3 to 5 years anything longer than that you are living on the edge.  :-)

post #38 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by DGNR8 View Post
 

Can a developer point out any modifications in the underlying code that would make Apple want to push this on just about every Intel based Mac out there?

 

I felt the same way when they put out iOS 7 working all the way back to iPhone 4, which I can attest is terrible.

 

Check out the thorough review of Mavericks on Ars Technica. Timer coalescing, App Nap, and RAM compression can help older Macs eke out a little more performance and battery life.

post #39 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post
 

1. It's the absolute finest iteration of OS X.

 

2. It's free (but, say, 29 bucks is barely the price of a meal for two, and you would have gotten an entire OS for it.)

 

3. It runs on hardware going back to 2007. For instance, it runs very well on my early 2008 Macbook Pro 2.4Ghz with 6GB RAM. 

 

All in all, as close to perfect as an OS X release can get. 

Anyone still running a 6+ year old Mac reminds me of Kramer running on E.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TuEdU_lrtZk

post #40 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland View Post

Whomever predicted this move is a genius ;-)

You had to get something right eventually ... 1wink.gif
From Apple ][ - to new Mac Pro I've used them all.
Long on AAPL so biased
"Google doesn't sell you anything, they just sell you!"
Reply
From Apple ][ - to new Mac Pro I've used them all.
Long on AAPL so biased
"Google doesn't sell you anything, they just sell you!"
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Mac OS X
AppleInsider › Forums › Software › Mac OS X › Mac owners adopting OS X Mavericks 3X faster than Mountain Lion