or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPad › Los Angeles school district's iPad program running grossly over budget
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Los Angeles school district's iPad program running grossly over budget - Page 2

post #41 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacITGuy View Post

Wait till kids start getting jacked for their iPads. It happened in our school district to the point the schools had to take them away from the kids then re-issue them for in school use only.

This is LA. Kids were jacking and getting jacked for expensive shit long before the district tight to give out iPads.

A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

(She's family so I'm a little biased)

Reply

A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

(She's family so I'm a little biased)

Reply
post #42 of 57
Huge surprise. Funny how generations past, including my own, were able to do just fine with regular textbooks, yet kids today needs hundreds of dollars worth of toys just to get a D. Before anyone jumps on me for this, do you have any evidence that use of tablets and such leads to better grades? No, you don't, because the only such studies that exist focus on autistic children, or those with similar neurological disabilities. That's not saying much either, as alternative forms of education have always given greater results in such cases.

Take away the toys, give them back their textbooks, and get back to education. Stop spending money the district, the city, and the state doesn't have.
post #43 of 57
Originally Posted by Cash907 View Post
Take away the toys, give them back their textbooks, and get back to education.

 

Because it’s impossible to educate on tablets¡

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply
post #44 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by iaeen View Post

I sure don't see any problem with the school district stalking my kids¡


Bingo!

But it's not just kids.

People are getting numbed to the fact that much of what they do on their computers is monitored, and virtually everything they do on their mobile devices is monitored these days. Not just in a listen-on-the-wires sense, but mobile devices, by default, are not really your own personal devices, they are more and more controlled day-to-day by the manufacturers and/or carriers. Look at the "forced OS upgrade" problem people are facing now with iOS 6 -> iOS 7. All your apps are constantly communicating out over the internet and you have literally no control over this unless you turn off your internet or set up your own filtering proxies or similar extreme measures.

It takes a lot of tech savvy (and effort) to avoid. It's sad and sick.
No Matte == No Sale :-(
Reply
No Matte == No Sale :-(
Reply
post #45 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by TeaEarleGreyHot View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacITGuy View Post

Wait till kids start getting jacked for their iPads.

 

What does that mean?  I understand "hijack" and "carjack" but "getting jacked" isn't a colloquialism with which I am familiar.

 "iJacked"

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

Reply

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

Reply
post #46 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by bullhead View Post
 

i do not see the logic in giving students iPads.  A Chrome Book would make more sense IMO.  Basically the kids need acess to the internet, Google Docs would let them write reports, term papers, create presentations, spreadsheets, etc...  Sure you can still hack the Chrome Book to run Linux but having a keyboard on a dirt cheap device for kids who are going to loose, break, have stolen, etc... an IPad is not what they really need.

 

A Google Chrome book is a piece of crap, what is the resale value nothing? At least they didn't get that wrong, besides if they go ahead with the program the district gets the cheaper price.

post #47 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phone-UI-Guy View Post
 

 

They are only over budget for the pilot. They get the money back when they buy the agreed upon volume of units. It should not be a surprise to anyone that you have to actually buy in bulk to get a discount. Well, everyone except LAUSD. 

 

No the LA Times needs a story now.

post #48 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phone-UI-Guy View Post
 

They are only over budget for the pilot. They get the money back when they buy the agreed upon volume of units. It should not be a surprise to anyone that you have to actually buy in bulk to get a discount. Well, everyone except LAUSD. 

 

I'm surprised to see AI perpetuating not only a misleading story, but the slanted headline word "grossly".  That word has such a negative connotation attached to it.  And the amount spent is apparently the expected amount, until the volume discount threshold is achieved. Why not instead use the headline "...mistakenly thought to be overbudget"?  Or, "...described as overbudget"?  Or even "...substantially overbudget" if in fact more is being spent than intended by the district? 

 

Saying "grossly overbudget" is very negative. And sadly supports the subliminal notion that the school district is spending frivolously.

post #49 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cash907 View Post

Huge surprise. Funny how generations past, including my own, were able to do just fine with regular textbooks, yet kids today needs hundreds of dollars worth of toys just to get a D. Before anyone jumps on me for this, do you have any evidence that use of tablets and such leads to better grades? No, you don't, because the only such studies that exist focus on autistic children, or those with similar neurological disabilities. That's not saying much either, as alternative forms of education have always given greater results in such cases.

Take away the toys, give them back their textbooks, and get back to education. Stop spending money the district, the city, and the state doesn't have.

 

Text books that were often 10 years behind date and in a shambles because each copy was used for as long as 5 years so the schools could 'get their money's worth', even if it means that a kid is walking around with a book that is in trash condition, full of lewd doodles, missing pages etc. 

 

That is one area where a tech option can bet others. Not to mention tools Garageband can allow students to have some level of music teaching, which studies have shown is useful if not vital to all kids, in a world where buying instruments just doesn't happen because they are focused on passing standardized tests to get federal money. Also, art classes have gone to hell for similar reasons. 

 

And then there is the fact that kids just aren't excited about coming to school and learning. Desire is something that has a huge effect on the effectiveness of any method and kids today are bored with sitting in a classroom and being lectured at. Even if you make them empty pockets etc to take away cell phones and such you can't make them want to listen if they don't want to. If something like an iPad makes them want to learn that is a huge hurdle overcome. And a good teacher will make it an effective tool just like they did when printed textbooks and looseleaf paper replaced oral learning and the slate

A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

(She's family so I'm a little biased)

Reply

A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

(She's family so I'm a little biased)

Reply
post #50 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by TeaEarleGreyHot View Post
 

 

I'm surprised to see AI perpetuating not only a misleading story, but the slanted headline word "grossly".  

 

AI feels they need the page hits. Nothing like name dropping Apple into a negative story to bring out the defenders and the trolls

A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

(She's family so I'm a little biased)

Reply

A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

(She's family so I'm a little biased)

Reply
post #51 of 57
Confused as to why they are paying so much in the first place.
Assuming they'll run Wifi versions as there is no reason to have 3G and as they won't ever have films, music or a load of pictures on them, surely 16gb is enough for a few school apps, 32gb max. That's $600 each maximum and that's retail cost.
post #52 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by iaeen View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by rcfa View Post

The general issue is that there's the false belief education gets better when one just throws enough money and thechnology at it, when back in the times of ink wells, chalk and blackboards people got an education most just can dream about today.

I'm sure e.g. spelling correction on the iPads does wonders to kids ability to master their language...

Also yet to be seen how healthy it is to stare for hours on actively lit screens both in classroom and out, as compared with eye friendly paper or even e-ink (if it absolutely has to be electronic books)

Not that iPads can't help improving certain aspects of education, like e.g. tracking where a supposedly called-in sick kid is by using "find my iPad" and holding parents responsible, but the iPads by themselves will not solve what's fundamentally broken in the US education system.

I sure don't see any problem with the school district stalking my kids¡

Otherwise great post.

 

I wasn't really referring to them stalking the kids, because they can't really call in sick without the parents consent (at least if parents do their job). Much more I'm referring to parents who call in their kids sick because they want to make a long weekend trip with the family, or do other things that wouldn't qualify for "time off from school". Now the sick kid from SF can be located up in Lake Tahoe where the family goes for an extended skiing weekend ;) 

Only problem: you can't fire parents, but one can fire school boards....

post #53 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by bullhead View Post
 

i do not see the logic in giving students iPads.  A Chrome Book would make more sense IMO.  Basically the kids need acess to the internet, Google Docs would let them write reports, term papers, create presentations, spreadsheets, etc...  Sure you can still hack the Chrome Book to run Linux but having a keyboard on a dirt cheap device for kids who are going to loose, break, have stolen, etc... an IPad is not what they really need.

 

It's not about hardware, it's about content. It's much easier for a teacher to whip up a demo app with Xcode than trying to deal with the development tools available for any other platform.

Similarly, there are tons of demo apps, simulation apps, textbooks, etc. for the iPad, and not very much for any other platform that's kids friendly.

So just as technology and money per se aren't the solution, neither is cost cutting when just looking at purchase price rather than doing a full cost-benefit analysis.

Also, the iPad with almost no movable parts, when put in a proper protective case, is a heck of a lot more resilient to abuse than a laptop with a keyboard, screen lid hinge, etc. So then, what if the device costs 50% but breaks twice as often, and then you have to add the administrative overhead? Zero gain, net loss.

post #54 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by charlituna View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cash907 View Post

Huge surprise. Funny how generations past, including my own, were able to do just fine with regular textbooks, yet kids today needs hundreds of dollars worth of toys just to get a D. Before anyone jumps on me for this, do you have any evidence that use of tablets and such leads to better grades? No, you don't, because the only such studies that exist focus on autistic children, or those with similar neurological disabilities. That's not saying much either, as alternative forms of education have always given greater results in such cases.

Take away the toys, give them back their textbooks, and get back to education. Stop spending money the district, the city, and the state doesn't have.

 

Text books that were often 10 years behind date and in a shambles because each copy was used for as long as 5 years so the schools could 'get their money's worth', even if it means that a kid is walking around with a book that is in trash condition, full of lewd doodles, missing pages etc. 

 

Make people pay for any textbook that's not returned in pristine condition. Guess how quickly that situation will improve, it's the government, they can put a lien on parents' property and wages if need be.

 

And then there is the fact that kids just aren't excited about coming to school and learning. Desire is something that has a huge effect on the effectiveness of any method and kids today are bored with sitting in a classroom and being lectured at. Even if you make them empty pockets etc to take away cell phones and such you can't make them want to listen if they don't want to. If something like an iPad makes them want to learn that is a huge hurdle overcome. And a good teacher will make it an effective tool just like they did when printed textbooks and looseleaf paper replaced oral learning and the slate

 

 

Excited? Is this Disneyworld? Whatever happened to duty? Back in the day if students didn't pay attention they got a beating from the teacher, and they shut up about it, because if the dad heard about it, he was sure to give them a second beating for giving the family a bad name. Pain is nature's way of teaching: make a mistake, if it doesn't kill you, it will hurt, you will not make that mistake again.

 

These days, people think it's good to idiot proof everything, and try to lure skateboard rats into the classroom with some sort of promise of watered-down edutainment. Attendance and learning should be non-negotiable. As far as I'm concerned, unless someone has a serious disability, they can repeat first grade until they are 40, but they are not leaving school until they have a GED.

 

The whole idea of walking through the world, now knowing why and how things are the way they are is revolting to me. I can't understand why anyone needs to be "motivated" to learn, but I guess in a society in which people look down on nerds, egg-heads, propeller-heads and teach "intelligent design" instead of evolution and science, it's no wonder that kids don't know what their purpose is inside a class room.

post #55 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by iaeen View Post

Private businesses aren't spending taxpayer money.

Also, businesses go bankrupt. The government ruins the economy.

You're obviously unfamiliar with "too big to fail/ jail"
post #56 of 57
Whatever problems they thought they might be having in the program didn't stop the LA School District from charging ahead with a $115M commitment just announced.
http://www.latimes.com/local/la-me-lausd-20140115,0,5059681.story#axzz2qUB0beNT
Edited by Gatorguy - 1/15/14 at 10:54am
melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
post #57 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

Whatever problems they thought they might be having in the program didn't stop the LA School District from charging ahead with a $115M commitment just announced.
http://www.latimes.com/local/la-me-lausd-20140115,0,5059681.story#axzz2qUB0beNT

 

Yes, just saw that myself. Interesting, isn't it?

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

Reply

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: iPad
  • Los Angeles school district's iPad program running grossly over budget
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPad › Los Angeles school district's iPad program running grossly over budget