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Apple's new MacBook Pros have slimmer cooling systems thanks to Haswell

post #1 of 32
Thread Starter 
Migrating the MacBook Pro line to Intel's new Haswell architecture allowed Apple to streamline the laptops' cooling system, resulting in lighter, slimmer devices, according to a new teardown.

15-inch Retina MacBook Pro teardown
Apple's latest 15-inch MacBook Pro | Source: iFixit


The 13-inch version of Apple's latest Retina MacBook Pro lineup benefited the most from Haswell's focus on power efficiency, reducing the number of fans in the clamshell casing from two to one, according to iFixit. The reduction is likely one of the primary reasons Apple was able to shrink the smaller laptop's vertical cross-section to match its larger sibling's 0.71 inch thin profile.

13-inch Retina MacBook Pro teardown
The new 13-inch Retina MacBook Pro featuring a single-fan design | Source: iFixit


Both the 13- and 15-inch variants sport a new, streamlined heatsink which combines the thermal pads for the CPU and GPU. Previously, each chip -?in models with discrete GPUs --?had its own thermal pad, and the two were connected to the fans via heat pipes.

15-inch Retina MacBook Pro teardown
An updated heatsink design featuring a single thermal pad for both the CPU and GPU | Source: iFixit


The repair site also noted that the headphone jack is now soldered directly onto the logic board, rather than connected via a ribbon cable or wire. Since the headphone jack is one of the few parts in the laptops that is subjected to repeated wear and tension, it makes replacing the port expensive.

New PCIe-based storage
New PCI-e based flash storage for the Retina MacBook Pro lineup | Source: iFixit


In addition to the structural changes, both units feature faster PCIe-based storage, which comes in the form of a replaceable daughtercard. The laptops' other elements, including the display construction and battery placement, remain largely the same.
post #2 of 32
I though the 15 inch MBP came with crystalwell
post #3 of 32
Nice glued together throwaway laptops. :-/
post #4 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post
 
New PCIe-based storage
New PCI-e based flash storage for the Retina MacBook Pro lineup | Source: iFixit


In addition to the structural changes, both units feature faster PCIe-based storage, which comes in the form of a replaceable daughtercard. The laptops' other elements, including the display construction and battery placement, remain largely the same.

 

So it sounds like the memory is upgradeable again in this latest revision. If it has returned to being upgradeable, even if only by Apple or approved repair companies, it should make people happy.

Unless I'm wrong & it's the SSD not system RAM.

post #5 of 32
SSDs don't offer enough space for a pro machine... was a fusion drive not possible?
post #6 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by TzTerri View Post

Nice glued together throwaway laptops. :-/

 

:no: No, they can be recycled via the appropriate sources, like at Apple Stores, & you get the benefit of getting an allowance on trade in at the Apple Stores.

 

I'm sure Tallest & the other regulars will agree.

post #7 of 32
Originally Posted by TzTerri View Post
Nice glued together throwaway laptops. :-/

 

Thanks for the FUD. When you feel like not lying anymore, feel free to keep posting.

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

Reply

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

Reply
post #8 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by alienzed View Post

SSDs don't offer enough space for a pro machine... was a fusion drive not possible?

 

Aren't the sizes increasing over time, & the cost decreasing a little?

post #9 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by TogetherWeStand View Post
 

 

:no: No, they can be recycled via the appropriate sources, like at Apple Stores, & you get the benefit of getting an allowance on trade in at the Apple Stores.

 

Haters gotta find something to hate about.

 

Because, as we know, every non-Apple laptop buyer pulls apart their laptop regularly and upgrades all the components.  In fact, I've already started changing the way I design technology because everyone in the world has become a computer hardware genius with infinite amounts of time on their hands. /s

 
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post #10 of 32

"Since the headphone jack is one of the few parts in the laptops that is subjected to repeated wear and tension, it makes replacing the port expensive."

 

I think I've owned 7 Apple laptops and a few non-Apple ones and the one thing I've never had a problem with is the headphone jack.  Also the sentence doesn't make logical sense.  What makes replacing the jack expensive is the fact that it's now soldered; the "fact" that headphone jacks are likely to wear out is what it a bad choice to solder it.  Good thing they don't actually wear out, which Apple knows of course based on their repair records.

post #11 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by auxio View Post
 

 

Haters gotta find something to hate about.

 

Because, as we know, every non-Apple laptop buyer pulls apart their laptop regularly and upgrades all the components.  In fact, I've already started changing the way I design technology because everyone in the world has become a computer hardware genius with infinite amounts of time on their hands. /s

Exactly.  In fact I do the same thing with everything I buy.  My car has a 30 year old chassie and a brand new hybrid engine and I recently switched from manual to automatic transmission.  Not one of those pesky throwaway cars that you can't upgrade.  Oh wait, I live in the real world and not some fantasyland.

post #12 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by TogetherWeStand View Post
 

 

So it sounds like the memory is upgradeable again in this latest revision. If it has returned to being upgradeable, even if only by Apple or approved repair companies, it should make people happy.

Unless I'm wrong & it's the SSD not system RAM.

Doubt that it has 128 GB of RAM as is printed on this chip, apparently it is the SSD

post #13 of 32

This makes me think that a Haswell i7 Mac Mini would be great: even more silent than the current generation (ie: the fan would spin less)

post #14 of 32

Wow! I am continually impressed with Apple's improvements. They never stop modifying their product lines. They already own the $1,000+ laptop space (over 90% market share). 

 

Apple has really mastered the art of making laptops! :)

post #15 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by alienzed View Post

SSDs don't offer enough space for a pro machine... was a fusion drive not possible?

 

How is 1TB not enough for a Notebook?

post #16 of 32
Originally Posted by alienzed View Post
SSDs don't offer enough space for a pro machine... was a fusion drive not possible?

 

If you’ve been paying attention to the MacBook Pro at all, no, it isn’t.

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

Reply

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

Reply
post #17 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by bananaman View Post

I though the 15 inch MBP came with crystalwell


Crystalwell is the code name for the new Iris Pro 5200 GPU. Haswell is intel code name for the CPU.

post #18 of 32

The very fact that Apple keeps redesigning the internals of their machines, even while keeping the externals consistent, shows the level of attention to detail and care. 1 larger fan instead of 2 is definitely an improvement, which should lead to less weight, lower noise levels, less moving parts, more battery life, and more reliability. I think I'm gonna pick up one of these pro machines to replace my 2012" Macbook Air (which is actually still running flawlessly and is an impeccable machine) but haven't yet decided if I'll go for 13 or 15. 

post #19 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by RPT View Post

Doubt that it has 128 GB of RAM as is printed on this chip, apparently it is the SSD

Indeed this is the SSD. The new iFixIt teardown of this machine clearly shows (and states) that the RAM is soldered to the board...so no user upgrades happening here unfortunately. So, for that entry level 13" rMBP it's an extra $100 to up it from 4GB to 8GB...or $300 (ouch!) from 4GB to 16GB.

Although didn't they say that with the memory compression in Mavericks the 4GB RAM is really more like 6GB 1smile.gif
post #20 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by alienzed View Post

SSDs don't offer enough space for a pro machine... was a fusion drive not possible?

What does being a professional have to do with storage capacity. That isn't to say some professionals benefit from significantly more storage but there is CPU and GPU performance, display size and quality across various range as, and even expandability that can determine whether a notebook is the best option for a professional.

Whether you're a "professional" or a regular consumer you buy the best product for your needs. If that isn't an Apple product then so be it.
post #21 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by RPT View Post
 

Doubt that it has 128 GB of RAM as is printed on this chip, apparently it is the SSD

 

Yes, I noticed after I posted, but decided not to amend as someone else would point it out. 

 

125GB RAM would be 1 hell of a laptop though eh? ;)

post #22 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by bananaman View Post

I though the 15 inch MBP came with crystalwell

 

They do. They come with Intel Crystalwell GPU. they also come with the additional discrete Nvidia Gforce 750M GPU.

 

The CPU is Intel Haswell.

post #23 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by auxio View Post
 

 

Haters gotta find something to hate about.

 

Because, as we know, every non-Apple laptop buyer pulls apart their laptop regularly and upgrades all the components.  In fact, I've already started changing the way I design technology because everyone in the world has become a computer hardware genius with infinite amounts of time on their hands. /s

 

Your sarcasm backfires because you would be designing the very thing that iFixit dings Apple for.  Your "computer hardware geniuses with infinite amounts of time on their hands" are the ones who seem to want designs that are difficult and time consuming to service, as some kind of self-validation.  Other people, even working technicians, just want to repair the thing as quickly and easily as possible.  But I guess it's easier to blame technicians for not working fast enough, rather than trying to improve service designs. Wouldn't cooperation between Apple's hardware design and service divisions benefit everyone?


Edited by Haggar - 10/25/13 at 12:35pm
post #24 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Haggar View Post
 

 

Your sarcasm backfires because "computer hardware geniuses with infinite time on their hands" are the ones who seem to glorify dealing with designs that are difficult and time consuming to service.  Other people, even working technicians, just want to repair the thing as quickly and easily as possible.

 

Actually, most laptops are never upgraded. they are designed to deliver a max amount of performance given the design caveats that come with very limited space in a mobile form factor. Same thing with Smart devices these days, only more so. 

 

As the market demands thinner, lighter notebooks, yet still with large displays, desktop class performance, and all day battery life, some concessions have to be made. being that most people never have the need to open their laptop for any reason, it's a pretty smart and reasonable concession.

 

If you want leading edge tech, performance, battery life, amazing screen, and high style all wrapped up in what is probably the very best notebook form factor money can buy, get the MBP w/ Retina. Option it from the get-go with what you need and you are set for the long haul. 

 

If you are compelled to simply tinker with a closed machines guts, then you can always buy a less highly-engineered, less-purpose built machine for that.

post #25 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Haggar View Post
 

Your sarcasm backfires because you would be designing the very thing that iFixit dings Apple for.  Your "computer hardware geniuses with infinite amounts of time on their hands" are the ones who seem to want designs that are difficult and time consuming to service, as some kind of self-validation.

 

No.  They're the ones who want easy access to every component in their computer so they can replace/customize everything on a whim to ensure they maintain bragging rights for the fastest gaming rig on the planet.  As well as wanting a multitude of ways to reconfigure/skin OS X/iOS to show everyone how elite they are.

 

Quote:
 Other people, even working technicians, just want to repair the thing as quickly and easily as possible.  But I guess it's easier to blame technicians for not working fast enough, rather than trying to improve service designs. Wouldn't cooperation between Apple's hardware design and service divisions benefit everyone?

 

Do you even know anyone who does authorized service for Apple?  I'm fairly certain that for the vast majority of large/complex repairs, Apple just gives a new machine and takes the old one in to be refurbished.  Anything requiring more than a few hours of service just isn't worth the labour costs these days.

 
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post #26 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by alienzed View Post

SSDs don't offer enough space for a pro machine... was a fusion drive not possible?
No need on a laptop, 3/4 TB is a good size laptop drive. On the new Mac Pro, that's a place where fusion could exsist(and should).
post #27 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

The 13-inch version of Apple's latest Retina MacBook Pro lineup benefited the most from Haswell's focus on power efficiency, reducing the number of fans in the clamshell casing from two to one, according to iFixit. The reduction is likely one of the primary reasons Apple was able to shrink the smaller laptop's vertical cross-section to match its larger sibling's 0.71 inch thin profile.

It also explains how they found room for a 16GB RAM option that wasn't available with the previous model.
post #28 of 32
Is it possible that the glue holding the battery in would melt if it was heated from the bottom?
post #29 of 32
Wait, so does anyone have any info on whether someone like OWC will be making uogradable SSDs then? That's what holding me back right now! Thanks.
15" 2.3 GHz i7, 8 GB RAM, Unibody Macbook Pro

iPhone 5 (Slate, 64 GB) [au by KDDI, Japan] (I'm going Docomo with the iPhone 6!)
iPad Air (Wifi, 32 GB)
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15" 2.3 GHz i7, 8 GB RAM, Unibody Macbook Pro

iPhone 5 (Slate, 64 GB) [au by KDDI, Japan] (I'm going Docomo with the iPhone 6!)
iPad Air (Wifi, 32 GB)
Reply
post #30 of 32
Originally Posted by Jjaro View Post
Wait, so does anyone have any info on whether someone like OWC will be making uogradable SSDs then?

 

Whether? That’s a given.

 

When? No clue.

 

Aren’t they the same as what are available now? Apple can only change the connector so many times.

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

Reply

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

Reply
post #31 of 32

Are the new cooling systems quieter as well? My late-2010 MacBook Pro 13" has fans that can be really loud, but only when playing CPU intensive games like Diablo 3.

post #32 of 32
I don't know.
15" 2.3 GHz i7, 8 GB RAM, Unibody Macbook Pro

iPhone 5 (Slate, 64 GB) [au by KDDI, Japan] (I'm going Docomo with the iPhone 6!)
iPad Air (Wifi, 32 GB)
Reply
15" 2.3 GHz i7, 8 GB RAM, Unibody Macbook Pro

iPhone 5 (Slate, 64 GB) [au by KDDI, Japan] (I'm going Docomo with the iPhone 6!)
iPad Air (Wifi, 32 GB)
Reply
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