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Americans who were recipients of means-tested government benefits in 2011 outnumbered year-round...

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 

All play, no work makes for an ever-present underclass.

 

Quote:

That means there were about 1.07 people getting some form of means-tested government benefit for every 1 person working full-time year round. The Census Bureau counted as recipients of means-tested government programs “anyone residing in a household in which one or more people received benefits from the program.” Many of these people lived in households receiving more than one form of means-tested benefit at the same time. Among the 108,592,000 people who fit the Census Bureau’s description of a means-tested benefit recipient in the fourth quarter of 2011 were 82,457,000 people in households receiving Medicaid, 49,073,000 beneficiaries of food stamps, 20,223,000 on Supplemental Security Income, 23,228,000 in the Women, Infants and Children program, 13,433,000 in public or subsidized rental housing, and 5,854,000 in the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families program. Also among the 108,592,000 means-tested benefit recipients counted by the Census Bureau were people getting free or reduced-price lunch or breakfast, state-administered supplemental security income and means-tested veterans pensions.

 

The 108,592,000 people who were recipients of means-tested government programs in the fourth quarter of 2011 does not include people who received benefits from non-means-tested government programs but not from means-tested ones. That would include, for example, people who received Social Security, Medicare, unemployment, or non-means-tested veterans compensation, but did not receive benefits from a means-tested program such as food stamps or public housing.

 

In the fourth quarter of 2011, according to the Census Bureau, there were 49,901,000 people who received Social Security benefits, 46,440,000 who received Medicare benefits, 5,098,000 on unemployment, and 3,178,000 who received non-means-tested veterans compensation.

 

Welcome to the present United States where you're an idiot for fighting the dependency and working full-time.

 

I have to share two quick anecdotes that show how this attitude pervades my classroom. I had a parent become very upset that their child, who did next to know work, was failing my class. The child was regularly monitored in the course of doing what you do as a teacher. However when you have 31 children, you can monitor at a level that basically gives a few minutes of help and regular prompting to continue working.

 

The child was basically completing less than half his work. This wasn't a high pressure situation. The work wasn't handed out and due in an hour. It wasn't handed in and marked failing for being unable to complete X amount of work in Y time. The work was allowed to be taken home for extra time and if necessary, extra help.

 

It sounds reasonable right? Only to this (and an increasing number of) parent(s) it wasn't. They were astonished that the child was required to complete the classwork. They were furious that they had to help their child or that I couldn't somehow force the child to work faster in the classroom. (They were also furious that he was losing his recess to complete the work as well.)

 

They decided to pull their child out and do an online school with him. They brought him back in a week. Why? It turns out he did even less for them one on one than he did for me at 31:1 ratio and of course now they actually had to babysit and deal with him during the day.

 

The second anecdote involves kids and poles. I've had three kids walk into them this year. Kids are always high energy and jumpy. However we are talking about a new class of kid that no longer understands causality. They are confounded about why these darn poles keep jumping in their way when they refuse to walk actually looking in the direction in which they were walking. Of course it is our job to patch them up and counsel them about the merits of actually looking in the direction in which they are walking. We are talking about third and fourth graders, not three or four year olds. However they live in a world in which the school provides two meals, and for many an afterschool snack and up to three hours of afterschool care in the afterschool program (most slots taken by these same parents that don't work since they need childcare to "find" a job.) They live in a world in which "My mom doesn't work" when asked about careers of their family and what they might want to be when grown or pondering career day.

 

It has grown very sad out there. I have had more people than every apply for my units for rent and declare that they are on full-time disability. When I share that they don't meet the income guidelines they increasingly scream how they shouldn't matter because the money is government money and thus "guaranteed" to keep coming in forever.

 

See the real risk, in their mind, is not being on the dole. Those job things with their requirements to work and earn income are very UNCERTAIN. Government benefits are certain and continue forever so the real idiot is the one who doesn't endorse getting that monthly guarantee.

 

Welcome to the Obama second term and to the future of America.

"During times of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolutionary act." -George Orwell

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"During times of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolutionary act." -George Orwell

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post #2 of 6

Can you explain the actual correlation between kids running into poles and politics? I suspect you're just venting.

post #3 of 6
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by hmm View Post
 

Can you explain the actual correlation between kids running into poles and politics? I suspect you're just venting.

 

Correlation between kids running into poles and politics. Well first I did label them as anecdotes. However we have a large and growing underclass that feels entitled, not responsible for making their through life. Instead of believing in causality or being deterministic, they believe in fate and that life is just happenstance. Those with jobs have them due to luck. Those who don't are just unlucky. Those who did well in school just lucked into the right brain and the right teachers. Those who do poorly just didn't draw the right straw in the lot of life.

 

Poles, well clearly everyone was running and those unlucky ones just happened to run where a pole happened to be. It wasn't really their fault. Life just threw the pole at them and they just happened to hit it.

"During times of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolutionary act." -George Orwell

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"During times of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolutionary act." -George Orwell

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post #4 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by trumptman View Post
 

 

Correlation between kids running into poles and politics. Well first I did label them as anecdotes. However we have a large and growing underclass that feels entitled, not responsible for making their through life. Instead of believing in causality or being deterministic, they believe in fate and that life is just happenstance. Those with jobs have them due to luck. Those who don't are just unlucky. Those who did well in school just lucked into the right brain and the right teachers. Those who do poorly just didn't draw the right straw in the lot of life.

My own experiences have involved some luck, at least in terms of timing. What would you do about the growing underclass? I'll start. If I had kids, I wouldn't push them toward the highest growth fields in hope of them doing well. Without telling them I would try to expose them to the widest range of subjects possible to ensure that they had some time to explore interests prior to college. I get the impression that everyone wants their kids to be successful, yet they project preconceived notions of what would likely be the path of least resistance. It doesn't help the kid excel if they aren't into the subject. I didn't like school in general. It took a love of reading and crushed it for years through forced analysis of bad literature and glossed over history topics, although that might vary by district. Out of curiosity what do you think of the curriculum where you teach?

 

Quote:
Poles, well clearly everyone was running and those unlucky ones just happened to run where a pole happened to be. It wasn't really their fault. Life just threw the pole at them and they just happened to hit it.

See I think you're projecting on this here. You're an observer. If that is a much more common occurrence today relative to the distribution of poles in recess areas, it would be interesting to know the cause so as to combat it. I don't think it's possible to draw broad cultural conclusions from seeing this.

 

It seems I got a bit carried away. I didn't mean to veer so far off topic. I suspect a portion of that article refers to medicare costs associated with a growing elderly population. I wanted to directly comment on that, yet it offers no breakdown.

post #5 of 6

trumpy's had some IPAs so lay off. Oh wait that's me.

 

 

When my kids fall and hurt themselves my wife and I say, "Oh did you hurt yourself? How did you do that?" not "Did you get hurt? What happened?" like it's some random happening. Or when they are like, "I don't like that game they are playing!" We're like all, "Well change it or don't play." #youhavecontroloverwhatyoudo

 

I think the conversation at home is important. I'd love to be a fly on the wall... There's a good social experiment for you. Some social scientists are doing that. Recording personal conversations for retrospective analysis. How about a rich vs poor home?

 

3rd/4th grade is interesting. My lazy super smart 4th grader all of a sudden wants to ace his spelling test with the goal of achievement and also after acing 9 levels doesn't have to do spelling anymore for the rest of the year and can move on to other stuff. A new academic spark. He's always been into learning but not really school. Meanwhile my 1st grader loves school, school work, school everything. They go to a different kind of school anyway.

 

good luck trumpy

post #6 of 6
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by hmm View Post
 

My own experiences have involved some luck, at least in terms of timing. What would you do about the growing underclass? I'll start. If I had kids, I wouldn't push them toward the highest growth fields in hope of them doing well. Without telling them I would try to expose them to the widest range of subjects possible to ensure that they had some time to explore interests prior to college. I get the impression that everyone wants their kids to be successful, yet they project preconceived notions of what would likely be the path of least resistance. It doesn't help the kid excel if they aren't into the subject. I didn't like school in general. It took a love of reading and crushed it for years through forced analysis of bad literature and glossed over history topics, although that might vary by district. Out of curiosity what do you think of the curriculum where you teach?

 

The underclass is growing because the government is feeding it in an attempt to grow it via dependence on government programs. The classic saying that a bird in the hand being worth more than two in the bush has become true with the bird being provided by the government. Part of the solution would have to involve simply doing something to get a service or money from the government. You shouldn't get something for nothing. It doesn't have to be cruel or punishing but teaching anyone that you get something for nothing leads to terrible decision making and makes them reactive to the world rather than proactive.

 

You talk about exposing them to the widest range of subjects possible. I'd be more than happy to do that. I'd be more than happy to have kids that are demanding it. Instead the underclass group is unengaged, uninterested and spends most of the day stirring the trouble pot by attempting to ditch and go play or party. When forced to be at school they spend their time harming themselves, making unrealistic demands and gossiping about the latest reality television shows.

 

Two-thirds of the children who come into my room read below grade level with a full third reading more than two years below grade level. Even when given self-selected, high interest books at their reading level, they simply go back to the gossip and goofing.

 

Why can't you convince or motivate them to do something different, because nothing in their world is affected by what they do. It is all provided for free in fact cultivating a little more dysfunction might lead to more cash in the form of a disability check for the child.

 

The curriculum where I teach is horribly outdated. Most of the stories cover a pretty decent range of interests and the main characters are actually pretty diverse as well. A few of the stories are stinkers of course. Since it was last purchased in 1997, I think we ought to update it. However there is no money for that per the state of California and various district personnel. There is always more money for special ed and special services though.

Quote:

See I think you're projecting on this here. You're an observer. If that is a much more common occurrence today relative to the distribution of poles in recess areas, it would be interesting to know the cause so as to combat it. I don't think it's possible to draw broad cultural conclusions from seeing this.

 

It seems I got a bit carried away. I didn't mean to veer so far off topic. I suspect a portion of that article refers to medicare costs associated with a growing elderly population. I wanted to directly comment on that, yet it offers no breakdown.

 

The school has been in place since the late 60's. I've taught at it for several years. Nothing about the physical nature of the scenario in question has changed except for the kids who literally spend so much time talking that they harm themselves by running into non-moving objects.

 

The 108,592,000 people who were recipients of means-tested government programs in the fourth quarter of 2011 does not include people who received benefits from non-means-tested government programs but not from means-tested ones. That would include, for example, people who received Social Security, Medicare, unemployment, or non-means-tested veterans compensation, but did not receive benefits from a means-tested program such as food stamps or public housing.

 

I think this passage addressed your concern.

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by FloorJack View Post
 

trumpy's had some IPAs so lay off. Oh wait that's me.

 

 

When my kids fall and hurt themselves my wife and I say, "Oh did you hurt yourself? How did you do that?" not "Did you get hurt? What happened?" like it's some random happening. Or when they are like, "I don't like that game they are playing!" We're like all, "Well change it or don't play." #youhavecontroloverwhatyoudo

 

I think the conversation at home is important. I'd love to be a fly on the wall... There's a good social experiment for you. Some social scientists are doing that. Recording personal conversations for retrospective analysis. How about a rich vs poor home?

 

3rd/4th grade is interesting. My lazy super smart 4th grader all of a sudden wants to ace his spelling test with the goal of achievement and also after acing 9 levels doesn't have to do spelling anymore for the rest of the year and can move on to other stuff. A new academic spark. He's always been into learning but not really school. Meanwhile my 1st grader loves school, school work, school everything. They go to a different kind of school anyway.

 

good luck trumpy

 

You understand the point here. The inner dialog we teach our kids. The problem solving process we take them through is very different for fatalists. Parents should teach their child to engage the world and become proactive in their management of themselves and their interactions. That fly on the wall would be very revealing indeed.

"During times of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolutionary act." -George Orwell

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"During times of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolutionary act." -George Orwell

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