or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPhone › Robotic testing finds touchscreen inaccuracies at edge of iPhone display
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Robotic testing finds touchscreen inaccuracies at edge of iPhone display

post #1 of 147
Thread Starter 
The touchscreens on Apple's flagship iPhone 5s and mid-range iPhone 5c show significant degradation in touch detection accuracy along their edges, which can affect hitting outside keys on the iOS virtual keyboard, new test data shows.

OptoFidelity touch test
Green points indicate measurements within ? 1 mm. Red points indicate measurements in excess of 1mm. Black circles show the robot's touch point. | Source: OptoFidelity


Using a robotic finger and a specialized suite of test software, Finnish automated testing company OptoFidelity found that Apple's latest handsets accurately detect touch inputs only across a small swath of their displays, roughly equating to the location of the on-screen keyboard.

The iPhone 5s and 5c, according to the company, suffer from "extremely bad" touch performance near the edges of the display. This makes it difficult for users to hit outlying keys on the virtual keyboard, like Q, O, and P, the report says.

OptoFidelity touch test
Touch accuracy measurements overlaid on an iPhone 5s keyboard, top, and a Galaxy S3 keyboard, bottom | Source: OptoFidelity


OptoFidelity compared the iPhones' displays to that of Samsung's Galaxy S3 and found that the Korean phone offered significantly more accurate touch detection across its entire touch surface.

"Because the touch accuracy is more even in Galaxy S3 than in iPhone 5s and iPhone 5c, you get a lot less typing errors, and letters which are close to the edge are working better," the report said.


An example of OptoFidelity's testing system used on Windows 8 tablets


The test methodology considers a difference of less than one millimeter between the robot's reported position and the touch screen's reported position to be "accurate."

The analysis marks a change from 2010, when testing showed that the iPhone display was by far the most accurate among smartphones then available on the market. That test from three years ago was conducted by drawing lines on the screen, and measuring how straight they would be.

While the latest test suggests the outside of Apple's iPhone displays may experience inaccuracies, the iPhone still leads the way when it comes to responsiveness. One study published last month by Agawi found the iPhone 5 display to be twice as fast as competing Android-based handsets.
post #2 of 147

Well. Good thing I'm not a robot!

post #3 of 147
"While the latest test suggests the outside of Apple's iPhone displays may experience inaccuracies, the iPhone still leads the way when it comes to responsiveness. One study published last month by Agawi found the iPhone 5 display to be twice as fast as competing Android-based handsets."


Hmm. . .
So faster mistakes then according to AI. What an odd way to attach a positive to a negative finding (if true). 1bugeye.gif
melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
post #4 of 147

What I've seen in iPhone 5 and 5s (but not in 4S and previous versions) is a greater probability of trying to type M, L or N and ending up deleting the previous character instead.

 

It's about time this type of testing is done and reported.

post #5 of 147

Touchgate!

na na na na na...
Reply
na na na na na...
Reply
post #6 of 147
Never had this issue with a single iPhone that I've used. If anything, the keyboard problems I've had most often occur with the keys in the middle -- e.g., G/H, U/I/O.

Also, are the edges 'numbed' on purpose, to prevent accidental touch from the bezel?
post #7 of 147
No problems like this yet on my 5s
post #8 of 147
Can anyone who owns a 5S or 5C confirm this?
post #9 of 147
Mr. Rocci has a lot to answer for this and compass reading.
post #10 of 147
I definitely have this issue, I've noticed in on 2 different iPhone 5s's.

The apps I used the most have placed their buttons (text) in bad locations.

The Music apps "Now Playing" and "Back to List."
The Nike Running app's "Run" button.
Instacast's "Resume playing full screen" and "Play episode" buttons.

Very annoying.
post #11 of 147
Something tell me that their top manufacturer samsung had something to do with it. It's weird how the iPhone 5s works so well but when the amazing 64bit A7 iPhone with ID sensor came the screens sensitivity is bad. I blame samsung.
post #12 of 147

I'm not sure how the problem could be with typing text, given the only letters close to the edge are Q and P.  I'm sure there are apps where buttons could be in problematic areas, but I've seen no issues on my 5s.  Even swiping on web pages to go back and forth show no issues for me, where you have to start at the very edge of the screen.

post #13 of 147
From the report:
"Everybody can do this same test with a real device. For example: you can try to tap the letter P
(English keyboard) when your finger is close to the right side of the screen. In many cases smartphone
does not react to your tap because touch result is reported outside of the button (as seen on Image
6). Also letters I, O and P are not responding as well as letters E,R,T,Y and U because the touch
accuracy is not constant. This will cause extra typing errors that are not actually caused by the end
user but the smartphone. "
http://www.optofidelity.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/OF_iPhone5C_vs_iPhone5C.pdf
melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
post #14 of 147
Something to consider:

Human fingers press on touchscreens at different angles, depending on how far you are reaching and how you are holding a device (try it yourself). It's not inconceivable that this is by design, because our fingers do not operate like a thin pin coming straight down onto the screen. With different angles, we have a different "feel" for where our fingers are supposed to be pressing.

That said, I have no information that would suggest Apple has actually designed for this, and it seems to me that if that were the case I would expect a more symmetric pattern than what this test is showing.

Just wanted to make people think a little bit. There are a lot of explanations for the result, including the possibility of a bad batch of sensors that doesn't represent the entirety of 5s and 5c phones.
No Matte == No Sale :-(
Reply
No Matte == No Sale :-(
Reply
post #15 of 147
Quote:
Originally Posted by tomhayes View Post

I definitely have this issue, I've noticed in on 2 different iPhone 5s's.

The apps I used the most have placed their buttons (text) in bad locations.

The Music apps "Now Playing" and "Back to List."
The Nike Running app's "Run" button.
Instacast's "Resume playing full screen" and "Play episode" buttons.

Very annoying.

The nike+ app! I thought I was losing my mind when I thought that run button was unresponsive.
post #16 of 147
This test seems exactly like the kind of test Steve Jobs would have loved. To paraphrase - 'well Ill know if it is not perfect'.

Compared to my prior 4s, on the 5s I have a noticable increase in difficulty selecting things that have small-ish selection areas.

Example, the new swipe left to delete in email, constantly must redo. Ususally end up accidently opening the mail. Im also seem to be tapping multiple times to open something. That was not the case on the 4s(ios6).

Whether this is 'just me', new to iphone 5 screen or is it an iOS7 issue, dunno.

Is it overwhelming enough to take the phone back etc-no; is it noticable and can be a bit irksome-for me yes.
Hokey religions and ancient weapons are no match for a good blaster by your side, kid.
Reply
Hokey religions and ancient weapons are no match for a good blaster by your side, kid.
Reply
post #17 of 147
My iPhone and iPad are fine at the edge of the screen. My galaxy tab 2 however is very unresponsive at the edge if the screen for both typing and selecting on screen buttons. I regularly have to zoom in to select buttons on the tab 2
post #18 of 147
Peppiopoiioppppaaqqqqmlllpppppoiiopppqqqwqwqwqwopooppooiilpoipp

Worked good so far. I call BS on their testing methods. Apple applies a lot of heuristics to the touch input to weed out false touches from what the user actually wants. Thus would make it practically impossible to do this type of automated testing because you have no way of knowing if and under what circumstances the heuristics are doing anything.

Less than 1mm is "accurate"? Where did they get this figure from? Is it a standardized published specification? Who published it? And how come the previous test drew straight lines and this one used a keyboard? How can they compare results from 2010 to now when the testing methodologies are completely different?

Completely bogus study by someone again looking to generate traffic by bashing Apple over some useless metric.

Author of The Fuel Injection Bible

Reply

Author of The Fuel Injection Bible

Reply
post #19 of 147
I've had every iPhone except original, 3GS and 5C and have never experienced anything like this. Could be a bad batch or possibly just something only affecting robotic testing explaining why I've never heard anyone complain of this in the past 6 years across the ENTIRE INTERNET.
post #20 of 147
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

From the report:
"Everybody can do this same test with a real device. For example: you can try to tap the letter P
(English keyboard) when your finger is close to the right side of the screen. In many cases smartphone
does not react to your tap
because touch result is reported outside of the button (as seen on Image
6). Also letters I, O and P are not responding as well as letters E,R,T,Y and U because the touch
accuracy is not constant. This will cause extra typing errors that are not actually caused by the end
user but the smartphone. "
http://www.optofidelity.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/OF_iPhone5C_vs_iPhone5C.pdf

 

Just tried this on my iPhone 5 without incident. Every tap was correctly registered as intended.

post #21 of 147
Why are new Apple's new phones (and both models!) being tested against last year's G S3?

"analysis marks a change from 2010" -- no, not really, it's not even remotely the same test

Also: users are not reporting inaccurate touches. And this is measuring dots. Multitouch doesn't return dot accuracy by millimeters to apps; it registers fat finger presses in oval areas, and does lots of math to determine the intent of the press or swipe or tap.
post #22 of 147

Not what I've experienced with either the 5 or my current 5s. Touch accuracy appears normal and there are a couple of apps that have controls very close to edges, like Podcasts, with no issue I've noticed.

 

Shrug.

 

Plus since I don't use a stylus I'm uncertain how relevant that test is in the real world…. might also be interesting to see multiple phones tested. The article says "an" iPhone etc. single samples aren't all that significant for measurement purposes….

 

ETA: Plus given finger touch processing is a single-point test even an accurate way to address screen input response? 


Edited by jfc1138 - 10/25/13 at 10:13am
post #23 of 147
The only problem I seem to have is occasionally hiring backspace when pressing the m key. Maybe 10% of the time on my 5s. On the 5, more like 3%
post #24 of 147
Quote:
Originally Posted by EricTheHalfBee View Post

Peppiopoiioppppaaqqqqmlllpppppoiiopppqqqwqwqwqwopooppooiilpoipp

Worked good so far. I call BS on their testing methods. Apple applies a lot of heuristics to the touch input to weed out false touches from what the user actually wants. Thus would make it practically impossible to do this type of automated testing because you have no way of knowing if and under what circumstances the heuristics are doing anything.

Less than 1mm is "accurate"? Where did they get this figure from? Is it a standardized published specification? Who published it? And how come the previous test drew straight lines and this one used a keyboard? How can they compare results from 2010 to now when the testing methodologies are completely different?

Completely bogus study by someone again looking to generate traffic by bashing Apple over some useless metric.

Heuristics? LOL!
post #25 of 147
Doesn't make sense that Apple would use an inferior touchscreen after having had the best before. Is it possible that iOS7 controls the accuracy of the touchscreen based on some special intelligence built into iOS7? The iPads have some sort of special intelligent sensitivity near the bezels to avoid inadvertent touches being registered. Is this a similar thing? I guess ANYTHING IS POSSIBLE but I will reserve making any judgements until I try it myself along with seeing / hearing what other people experience.
Artificial intelligence is no match for natural stupidity.

"A common mistake that people make when trying to design something completely foolproof is to underestimate the ingenuity of complete fools."
Reply
Artificial intelligence is no match for natural stupidity.

"A common mistake that people make when trying to design something completely foolproof is to underestimate the ingenuity of complete fools."
Reply
post #26 of 147
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

From the report:
"Everybody can do this same test with a real device. For example: you can try to tap the letter P
(English keyboard) when your finger is close to the right side of the screen. In many cases smartphone
does not react to your tap because touch result is reported outside of the button (as seen on Image
6). Also letters I, O and P are not responding as well as letters E,R,T,Y and U because the touch
accuracy is not constant. This will cause extra typing errors that are not actually caused by the end
user but the smartphone. "
http://www.optofidelity.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/OF_iPhone5C_vs_iPhone5C.pdf

No problems here on my 5s dude. Are you having these issues on your 5c?  Just out of curiosity. 

iMac 2007, Macbook pro 2008, Mac Mini 2011
Reply
iMac 2007, Macbook pro 2008, Mac Mini 2011
Reply
post #27 of 147
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corrections View Post

Why are new Apple's new phones (and both models!) being tested against last year's G S3?

"analysis marks a change from 2010" -- no, not really, it's not even remotely the same test

Also: users are not reporting inaccurate touches. And this is measuring dots. Multitouch doesn't return dot accuracy by millimeters to apps; it registers fat finger presses in oval areas, and does lots of math to determine the intent of the press or swipe or tap.


Real reasoning!

Quote:
Originally Posted by EricTheHalfBee View Post

Peppiopoiioppppaaqqqqmlllpppppoiiopppqqqwqwqwqwopooppooiilpoipp

Worked good so far. I call BS on their testing methods. Apple applies a lot of heuristics to the touch input to weed out false touches from what the user actually wants. Thus would make it practically impossible to do this type of automated testing because you have no way of knowing if and under what circumstances the heuristics are doing anything.

Less than 1mm is "accurate"? Where did they get this figure from? Is it a standardized published specification? Who published it? And how come the previous test drew straight lines and this one used a keyboard? How can they compare results from 2010 to now when the testing methodologies are completely different?

Completely bogus study by someone again looking to generate traffic by bashing Apple over some useless metric.

More real reasoning!
post #28 of 147
And how much did Samsung pay to subsidize this 'wonderful' test?

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

Reply

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

Reply
post #29 of 147
Fascinating.

There is a group of folks who never experience and unfailingly refute every reported problem on iPhones.

Then there is a group that jumps on the same problems and shout "gotcha".

Which group is more credible?
post #30 of 147
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post

Can anyone who owns a 5S or 5C confirm this?

I have a 5s and think I might be making typing mistakes I hadn't made before. Seems to be on the edges. Interesting and worth looking into but it hasn't been a source of frustration by any means. Of course I've been very impressed by the phone in general (fast touch response, fast page/app loading, fast fastness) so maybe I'm still in the honeymoon phase.
post #31 of 147
Quote:
Originally Posted by stelligent View Post

Heuristics? LOL!

What's your point?
post #32 of 147
Quote:
Originally Posted by EricTheHalfBee View Post

 ....... Completely bogus study by someone again looking to generate traffic by bashing Apple over some useless metric.

I agree ... this "report" doesn't pass the smell test. The first sentence in their "report" :   Out of curiosity, OptoFidelity test patrol engineers wanted to see what differences in performance our untouchable robot systems could find between iPhone 5 S and iPhone C and would that difference guide consumer to pick right version. 

 

Out of curiosity ???   Give me a break ... and they were just as "curious", I suppose, to "test"it against Galaxy S3 .... how "convenient".  I sense this is more of Samsung's dirty tricks campaign.  Just another paid shill working for the world's most shameful company.  :no:

Apple is not Appl ...... Please learn the difference!    
Reply
Apple is not Appl ...... Please learn the difference!    
Reply
post #33 of 147
Quote:
Originally Posted by zroger73 View Post
 

Well. Good thing I'm not a robot!

This may well be the most on point response.

post #34 of 147
Quote:
Originally Posted by GeorgeiP5 View Post

Something tell me that their top manufacturer samsung had something to do with it. It's weird how the iPhone 5s works so well but when the amazing 64bit A7 iPhone with ID sensor came the screens sensitivity is bad. I blame samsung.

You are aware that samsung also make that Amazing 64bit A7?

Also AFAIK, 5s/c use same display as 5, manufactured by Sharp, Japan Display and LG display. No samsung.


Edited by patpatpat - 10/25/13 at 10:24am
post #35 of 147

On my 5s I did notice some inaccuracies when running 7.0.2 but they seemed to disappear with 7.0.3 just like the calibration and motion issues with this release.  Just did the "p" and "q" test without a problem and the "now playing" button works ok too.  People with the issue, what version are you using?

post #36 of 147
I own a 5s 64... I have zero issues....
I tried to duplicate the problem after reading the article... Again zero issues... Works like a charm.

I have a strong feeling this Nothing but bogus reporting.
post #37 of 147
Quote:
Originally Posted by djsherly View Post

The nike+ app! I thought I was losing my mind when I thought that run button was unresponsive.

I saw in another thread that you were also having trouble with the Touch ID sensor. Are by chance a guitar player with callouses? Suffer from cold hands?

Maybe you should make a video showing us these problems. Otherwise we have no way to judge your credibility.
post #38 of 147

Well I'm glad my finger is not 1mm thick like the robot.

 

I'm pretty sure the software is ignoring 1mm touches near the edge.  When my finger becomes 1mm thick I'll get a S4 Samdung.

post #39 of 147
Quote:
Originally Posted by Flaneur View Post

What's your point?

If you have to ask ...

Why don't you make it up like you're prone to doing?
post #40 of 147
What are the results of the GS4 and Notes?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: iPhone
  • Robotic testing finds touchscreen inaccuracies at edge of iPhone display
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPhone › Robotic testing finds touchscreen inaccuracies at edge of iPhone display