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MOGA iPhone game controller outed, features external battery pack

post #1 of 31
Thread Starter 
A new, battery-powered "Made for iPhone" game controller from Android accessory maker MOGA was revealed Friday in leaked images on Twitter.

New MOGA controller


The controller features an angular design and features two thumbsticks, a directional pad, shoulder buttons, a pause button and four function buttons in a collapsible design. Twitter user @evleaks, who revealed the device, said it also packs an auxiliary 1,800 mAh battery.

MOGA's gamepad is expected to work with Apple's dedicated game controller framework which the company unveiled in June at its annual Worlwide Developers Conference. Apple specifically named Logitech --?whose controller was leaked earlier this month --?and MOGA as "key partners."

New MOGA controller


Apple's framework specifies three configurations for game controllers: two form-fitting varieties, in which an iOS device sits inside the controller and is directly attached to the device, and one wireless configuration.

The leaked Logitech controller appears to follow Apple's "standard" form-fitting controller profile, with a directional pad, four function buttons, and two shoulder buttons. The MOGA controller shows signs of using the "extended" profile, adding two additional shoulder buttons and two thumbsticks. Both profiles also specify a dedicated "pause" button.

There is no word on pricing or availability for either controller, though Apple promised in June that the first wave of devices would be "on store shelves later this fall."
post #2 of 31
The only problem with that design might be the fact that most people use cases. It can be troublesome to remove a case just to play a game so unless this will work with an iPhone in a case that may be a big hindrance.
post #3 of 31
"later this fall" is pretty much right now. I am interested in the wireless one to play on an ipad and possibly on an Apple TV later, if Apple release the damn thing at some point in the future.
post #4 of 31
Originally Posted by herbapou View Post
"later this fall" is pretty much right now.

 

Fall ends December 21.

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply
post #5 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by gwmac View Post

The only problem with that design might be the fact that most people use cases. It can be troublesome to remove a case just to play a game so unless this will work with an iPhone in a case that may be a big hindrance.

 

I was thinking about that too.  I bet lots of kids will want dedicated ipod touch just to play games with that controller.

post #6 of 31
Quote:

Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

 

 



Fall ends December 21.





 



Yep, but later doesnt have to be on the very last day. Maybe I feel winter is coming because its so cold here today.

post #7 of 31
Originally Posted by herbapou View Post

Yep, but later doesnt have to be on the very last day.

 

You’re new to Apple and Apple-related products, aren’t you? :p

 
Maybe I feel winter is coming because its so cold here today. 

 

We had our first October snow in a little over a decade.

 

Here, it’s not Fall. It’s Plummet.

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply
post #8 of 31

Wouldn't buy it for one reason: asymmetrical analog sticks. As someone who never allowed Microsoft stuff in my house (I'm sure I'm not the only one in this particular forum), why would I want my controller on an iOS device to look like an XBox controller? I've always used other platforms for gaming, and their analog sticks are properly symmetrical.

post #9 of 31
Originally Posted by scampercom View Post
Wouldn't buy it for one reason: asymmetrical analog sticks. As someone who never allowed Microsoft stuff in my house (I'm sure I'm not the only one in this particular forum), why would I want my controller on an iOS device to look like an XBox controller?

 

Because it looks like a Nintendo controller before it looks like a Microsoft one and anything other than asymmetric analog sticks is completely idiotic and a physical pain to use.

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply
post #10 of 31

That's subjective, obviously. But you knew that.

post #11 of 31
Originally Posted by scampercom View Post
That's subjective, obviously. But you knew that.

 

Strange that you don’t, apparently. And no, I figure everyone’s hands have ten fingers, bending the same way, doing the same things.

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply
post #12 of 31
I play games primarily on iPad and almost never on my iPhone. From looking at that little lighting port, I don't think it'll have wireless ability and won't work on iPad...
post #13 of 31
Originally Posted by st88 View Post
'Idiotic' and a 'physical pain to use' is based off of your preference, not everyone's.

 

Close your hands up.

 

I rest my case.

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply
post #14 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Strange that you don’t, apparently. And no, I figure everyone’s hands have ten fingers, bending the same way, doing the same things.
I once met someone with twelve toes.
post #15 of 31
Originally Posted by Johnny Mozzarella View Post
I once met someone with twelve toes.

 

Six digits per appendage is dominant! There’s a community of Amish in Pennsylvania who, through choosing to marry amongst themselves, pretty much all have six fingers.

 

Neat little tidbits.

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply
post #16 of 31

Does anybody know the name of the game on the screen in the first pic?

Bueller? Anyone? 

One thought he was invincible... the other thought he could fly.

They were both wrong.

Reply

One thought he was invincible... the other thought he could fly.

They were both wrong.

Reply
post #17 of 31
This looks very unApple like. Way too much bullshit and redundant features. Here is how to do it:

- Rectangular controller, same length as an iPhone but less wide. Can be held both horizontally and vertically.

- One end is a clickable touch pad and the other end has an analog stick. No game today *needs* a D-pad.
And the second analog is used, in almost any game, for something that a mouse/touchpad device would do much better (absolute vs. relative and springloaded vs. nonspringloaded). Such as camera control or menu selection.

- The same thing on the back of the controller. Only the stick or slider goes right through the pad with a thumb/indexfinger-rest on the other side. This allows main controls with two or more fingers which gives far better precision (humans pinch grip with thumb and index finger is what gives us our edge in dexterity).

- Two shoulder buttons.

- One tactile button in the middle on one side and a home/pause button one the other, also in the middle.

That would be all that any currently realistically feasible game could want for controls.
More is just clutter.

The best option for attaching it to a small portable iDevice would be a clamshell case with a stiff hinge (laptop style) and a gentle padded springloaded clamp for varying sizes due to cases and generations.
This would be quite thick but much more portable than the long stick depicted, or two separate devices.
post #18 of 31
No thanks. Touchpad on one side would screw with the balance and how you grip the unit, not to mention being crap for feedback. Analogue sticks and buttons are much better.

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post #19 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by gwmac View Post

The only problem with that design might be the fact that most people use cases. It can be troublesome to remove a case just to play a game so unless this will work with an iPhone in a case that may be a big hindrance.

If this design slots together like it seems to show so that it's both form-fitting and standalone in one unit, that at least means they can sell a single controller that works for both scenarios.
post #20 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crowley View Post

No thanks. Touchpad on one side would screw with the balance and how you grip the unit, not to mention being crap for feedback. Analogue sticks and buttons are much better.

 

What balance? And balance for whose sake? There is a reason we have dominant hands.

The touchpad would have just as much feedback as a mouse or a touchpad on a computer. Plenty, that is.

You could put a speaker/actuator underneath it for very precise tactile effects but it wouldn't be a necessity.

 

Really weird that Apple haven't done this themselves a looong time ago. They would have wiped the floor with every console maker.

It would seem to be a nice and interesting challenge for Ive and co.


Edited by Smalltalk-80 - 10/25/13 at 4:31pm
post #21 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by st88 View Post
 

Your concept of a controller above sounds extremely flawed (rectangular shape, touchpad + analog stick, focus for a dominant hand).  

I'm not sure what you had in mind in the second part of your comment, but I don't think Apple would have "wiped the floor" with any console maker.

 

Valve's Steam controller already utilizes dual touch-pads and a touch screen in the centre of the controller:

79072_500x390.jpg 


God that looks fugly

post #22 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lord Amhran View Post


God that looks fugly

And impractical. How are you supposed to use it?
post #23 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by st88 View Post
 

Something like this: 



Considering it's Valve, I'll give them the benefit of the doubt (until I actually try the controller).


Actually I take that back. It looks pretty interesting. I'll stick with my DS for my portable gaming needs for now but this might change that.

post #24 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by st88 View Post
 

Something like this: 



Considering it's Valve, I'll give them the benefit of the doubt (until I actually try the controller).

 

FYI -- the legacy mouse/keyboard mode on the Valve controller is identical to the control scheme already employed by iOS multitouch games like Modern Combat:

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
Reply

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
Reply
post #25 of 31
Not identical, the Steam controller has texture and tactile feedback.

censored

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censored

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post #26 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by st88 View Post
 

Your concept of a controller above sounds extremely flawed (rectangular shape, touchpad + analog stick, focus for a dominant hand).  

I'm not sure what you had in mind in the second part of your comment, but I don't think Apple would have "wiped the floor" with any console maker.

 

Valve's Steam controller already utilizes dual touch-pads and a touch screen in the centre of the controller

The rectangular shape and dual sides will allow you to hold it in either horizontal or vertical position just like an iPhone (or an old Famicom or Colecovision pad) and it will allow you to flip the controller any way, to suit the game and holding style. Left and right-handedness will not be a problem here.

 

The double sided touchpad will allow you to do the walking fingers "trick" with index and thumb, so you don't have to "paddle" (lift, move back and put down) the view or cursor like on the Valve controller. The people who have tried the Valve controller also, almost everyone of them mention that they are missing a stick or directional buttons for relative movement. So only touchpads obviously isn't the solution.

 

A doublesided stick would be the first true 3d stick. Not only would you be able to have two finger dexterity for better precession, you would also be able to press it up as well as down.

 

Apple would have taken the videogame market by storm by now if they had released a sanctioned official controller for everyone to develop for. That is really the only thing holding all the iOS devices back from truly being able to replace at least hand held consoles. Apple TV 2 would also have made a great competitor to Wii, with it being just as, if not more powerfull hardware wise.


Edited by Smalltalk-80 - 10/26/13 at 3:25pm
post #27 of 31
Using fingers on both sides sounds horrendous for actually holding the thing stably, and especially with this lopsided touchpad and stick arrangements, which would require a crazy grip that would unbalance the device. You keep mentioning this orientation independence, but if the shoulder triggers are the only buttons then the vertical orientation will be extremely limited. On that point, two buttons is in itself, too limited for a lot of the games that people buying these things would want. You're about eight buttons shorter than your competition.

On a wider point, the game controller has been around twenty years, and has seen many attempts to do something different with gimmicky hints like you're suggesting. None have taken off, because the core balance and symmetry of the game controllers we know wins out. I think that's even more important in a handheld because you're dealing with balance not only of the controller, but also of the attached screen.

No, this idea is a dud, and Apple would be laughed out of the conference hall for suggesting anything like it.

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post #28 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crowley View Post

Using fingers on both sides sounds horrendous for actually holding the thing stably, and especially with this lopsided touchpad and stick arrangements, which would require a crazy grip that would unbalance the device. You keep mentioning this orientation independence, but if the shoulder triggers are the only buttons then the vertical orientation will be extremely limited. On that point, two buttons is in itself, too limited for a lot of the games that people buying these things would want. You're about eight buttons shorter than your competition.

On a wider point, the game controller has been around twenty years, and has seen many attempts to do something different with gimmicky hints like you're suggesting. None have taken off, because the core balance and symmetry of the game controllers we know wins out. I think that's even more important in a handheld because you're dealing with balance not only of the controller, but also of the attached screen.

No, this idea is a dud, and Apple would be laughed out of the conference hall for suggesting anything like it.

You'd be using your two or three other fingers to hold it, just like you do with a gamepad or iDevice now.

In the vertical mode you'd be able to hold with one hand, manipulating the touchpad freely with multitouch with the other.

 

More buttons is not in and of itself better, in the way it's implemented today, it's just clutter and leftovers from previous generations. The d-pad, shoulder buttons and  A B X Y buttons for example are just plain ripped off from the Famicom and Super Famicom controllers.

It doesn't represent a darwinian chain of selection and fine tuning, only fear of having less than the other guys. 

The touchpad would allow for very fast menu selection or gestures though, that would make for more control options than would fit as buttons on the pad anyway.

 

WRT shoulder buttons you could of course have them "wrap around" to the short side. Or just have separate "trigger" buttons there wired to the same function.

 

An iPad will never attach to the controller, so obviously it will have to be a controller that works as well attached as free. Mine will.

You'll have exactly as good balance as with a 3DS, if that is such a great concern.


Edited by Smalltalk-80 - 10/26/13 at 4:31pm
post #29 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crowley View Post

Not identical, the Steam controller has texture and tactile feedback.

"For her pleasure," he added. 1wink.gif

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
Reply

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
Reply
post #30 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by herbapou View Post
 I feel winter is coming 

 

post #31 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post
 

 

Strange that you don’t, apparently. And no, I figure everyone’s hands have ten fingers, bending the same way, doing the same things.

 

If you'd read my original post, it was about why *I* wouldn't use the controller. I never said it shouldn't be used by anyone. Therefore, my post was always from a subjective viewpoint. My reasons for commenting on a story are different from yours.

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