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Mavericks Feature Focus: Safari 7 and iCloud Keychain - Page 2

post #41 of 52
Safari 7 offers to create passwords for new sites for me. The issue you have reported does not manifest itself in my MacBook Pro.
post #42 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by fuzz_ball View Post

The fatal flaw with this whole model is that it assumes:

a) you will only ever use Safari to access those websites you use logins for
b) you will never be in a situation where you need to access one of those sites from a non-Apple-based OS.

I can see it now: people start generating impossible to remember passwords because they don't have to remember them, iCloud keychain does that for them. Then they are out of town and they lose their iPhone/iPad and need to log in through some random computer (friend/family member's Windows PC for instance) and now they can't get access to anything, because they don't know any of the passwords and iCloud keychain doesn't work.

Cue the violins, cause now you're screwed.

Agreed. I use dashlane password manager and I can log in on the website to retrieve my passwords. Apple should use iCloud this way and allow you to access your keychain data by logging in to iCloud.com.
post #43 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by fuzz_ball View Post

I can see it now: people start generating impossible to remember passwords because they don't have to remember them, iCloud keychain does that for them. Then they are out of town and they lose their iPhone/iPad 

I can't see a situation where I'll lose my iPhone or iPad. Could you name one? If stolen, then I have more problem to solve than go to random website and post.

post #44 of 52

The place I’d love a really strong password above all else is iTunes and the App Store. Alas, iCloud Keychain won’t work there in OS X at the moment. So, I’ll have to stick with a 'memorable’ password.

post #45 of 52

Sure.

 

BEFORE when you had a group of bookmarks in a folder on your Bookmark bar, it would appear with a little triangle next to it. Clicking it would expand the list and you could either click on each one individually or select "open all tabs" at the end of the list.

 

Now, you can have a little "square" next to it and once you click, all bookmarks will open. Just one click.

 

 

To turn this feature on (or OFF) just right click on the name of the bookmarks collection on your Bookmark bar and select "Automatically Open in Tabs".

post #46 of 52

Sure.

 

BEFORE when you had a group of bookmarks in a folder on your Bookmark bar, it would appear with a little triangle next to it. Clicking it would expand the list and you could either click on each one individually or select "open all tabs" at the end of the list.

 

Now, you can have a little "square" next to it and once you click, all bookmarks will open. Just one click.

 

 

To turn this feature on (or OFF) just right click on the name of the bookmarks collection on your Bookmark bar and select "Automatically Open in Tabs".

post #47 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacHarry de View Post

Sadly, performance of Safari is downgraded. iCloud keychane installation does not work proper for many user

Many? FUD.

 

Works fine for me.

post #48 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by fuzz_ball View Post

The fatal flaw with this whole model is that it assumes:

a) you will only ever use Safari to access those websites you use logins for
b) you will never be in a situation where you need to access one of those sites from a non-Apple-based OS.

I can see it now: people start generating impossible to remember passwords because they don't have to remember them, iCloud keychain does that for them. Then they are out of town and they lose their iPhone/iPad and need to log in through some random computer (friend/family member's Windows PC for instance) and now they can't get access to anything, because they don't know any of the passwords and iCloud keychain doesn't work.

Cue the violins, cause now you're screwed.

:no: Um, no. Why should Apple assume that any Mac user is going to be using their secure logins on anything but their personal Macs? 

 

Why should Apple make a worse feature to accommodate what 90% of Mac users will not do? No, that's not how you do things.

 

This feature is designed around the expected behavior: You use devices that you own, which have your Apple ID and iCloud Keychain. That's secure. That's normal. That's expected. 

 

Your alternative is to use less secure passwords, or worse the same password for everything, so that you can 'remember them' for use on some random computer. Great idea. :rolleyes:

post #49 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by CommentSF View Post
 

Sure.

 

BEFORE when you had a group of bookmarks in a folder on your Bookmark bar, it would appear with a little triangle next to it. Clicking it would expand the list and you could either click on each one individually or select "open all tabs" at the end of the list.

 

Now, you can have a little "square" next to it and once you click, all bookmarks will open. Just one click.

 

 

To turn this feature on (or OFF) just right click on the name of the bookmarks collection on your Bookmark bar and select "Automatically Open in Tabs".

Ahhh, I see now. Yes that feature was there before. You just had to go into the "bookmarks tab" and select the "bookmark bar" in the left pane and you would put a check in a box next to that folder with the link in it. I was actually thinking you meant there was an option to left click on any bookmark in the bookmark bar and have it open in a new tab.


Edited by Roller - 11/2/13 at 12:49pm
post #50 of 52

Safari has been one of the best software experiences through its entire existence. I have two complaints with it right now. One is just confusing, the other makes me livid.

 

Tab View. Tab View does not let you view your tabs. This statement should not need explaining, except in the case of ‘why?’ It’s mind-boggling. It’s insane. Tab View is utterly useless. It needs to look like Top Sites, for heaven’s sake. How can this possibly be so difficult? Who in their right mind looks at it the way it is and things it is useful in any situation?

 

Password Auto-Fill. Mavericks has decided to do this:

No. NO. NO. NO.

I am in control of my security. I decide how secure I want my computer to be. And if I want to save every effing password on the Internet and not have a screen lock, that is my choice to make. You, the software, have no right to do this. I can save my effing credit card numbers without a screen lock, but magically “websites that request passwords not be saved” get this override? What business does a website have telling a browser to do ANYTHING in the first place?! No, honestly, answer that one first. The browser is MY conduit to your site. If I want to save my information for your site locally, what right do you have to stop me from doing that?! If I made my own browser, it’d be full HTML5 and CSS3 compatible, sure, but it would flip the bird to every site it came across. It would literally run checks to see if a site wanted this to happen, find any strings that looked like e-mail addresses on that site, and mail a picture of an extended middle finger to whoever owned that.

 

This needs changed in 10.9.1. Completely unacceptable.

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone] exists, it doesn’t deserve to.
Reply

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone] exists, it doesn’t deserve to.
Reply
post #51 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

 

Password Auto-Fill. Mavericks has decided to do this:

No. NO. NO. NO.

I am in control of my security. I decide how secure I want my computer to be. And if I want to save every effing password on the Internet and not have a screen lock, that is my choice to make. You, the software, have no right to do this. I can save my effing credit card numbers without a screen lock, but magically “websites that request passwords not be saved” get this override? What business does a website have telling a browser to do ANYTHING in the first place?! No, honestly, answer that one first. The browser is MY conduit to your site. If I want to save my information for your site locally, what right do you have to stop me from doing that?! If I made my own browser, it’d be full HTML5 and CSS3 compatible, sure, but it would flip the bird to every site it came across. It would literally run checks to see if a site wanted this to happen, find any strings that looked like e-mail addresses on that site, and mail a picture of an extended middle finger to whoever owned that.

 

This needs changed in 10.9.1. Completely unacceptable.

It seems that you and the Chrome security team are of similar minds. (https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=6166731)

post #52 of 52
Originally Posted by d4NjvRzf View Post
It seems that you and the Chrome security team are of similar minds. (https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=6166731)

 

I have no problem with being told it’s safer to have a more secure setup on the OS side of things to hide my passwords in the browser. I have a strong problem being told I CANNOT do something unless I set up unwanted security. I have this same problem with Exchange accounts in iOS. They FORCE you to set up an OS-level passcode to even use it. That’s just ludicrous. Dangerous, criminal insanity. They have no right. It is my device; I decide how secure it is.

 

The only way anyone’s getting to my data is if they get to my computer physically. Guess what: they’re not getting to my computer physically. There’s no excuse for this.

 

I notice that Chrome violates security Safari doesn’t otherwise, though.

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone] exists, it doesn’t deserve to.
Reply

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone] exists, it doesn’t deserve to.
Reply
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