or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › Software › Mac Software › Apple faces backlash over missing, changed functions in iWork revamp
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Apple faces backlash over missing, changed functions in iWork revamp

post #1 of 216
Thread Starter 
A growing number of iWork users have taken to Apple's Support Communities forums to air complaints about the numerous changes Apple made to its productivity suite, which some say is now unusable.

Pages


At Apple's iPad event last week, the company debuted all-new, redesigned iWork apps for both OS X and iOS, touting the changes as part of the suite's biggest update ever. It appears, however, that a significant number of users have not taken kindly to those tweaks.

As with any software update, not everyone will be pleased by feature additions and omissions, but a look at Apple's Support Communities shows a rising tide of discontent from longtime iWork users. Anecdotally, AppleInsider readers have also voiced their complaints as to the apps' modifications.

One of the more active forum threads deals with the new Pages app for OS X. Started one day after the updates rolled out, the discussion consists of a rolling list of features "missing" or "removed" from Pages version 5.0. So far, the thread has racked up over 18,500 views and 235 replies over the past five days.

Among the more prominent feature "nerfs" are the removal of Pages' floating Inspector Tool, deleted templates, non-configurable toolbars, no vertical ruler, no format bar, and merge field functionality, along with many others.

Adding to users' frustration, opening Pages documents created in older versions of the app will automatically translate the file into a form editable by the new software, meaning unsupported assets may be discarded. For example, a few users complained of a conversion error that deletes table data. If these changes are saved in version 5.0, there is no way to recover the complete document unless it was backed-up or duplicated.

As for Numbers, a similar thread listing the new app's deficiencies was posted by a different forum member. The discussion has been visited over 8,300 times and carries 137 replies. Users complain of missing spreadsheet cell management functions, the removal of selected row sorting and the inability to set margins, among other changes.

Apple is no stranger to negative feedback spurred by a revamp of popular software. A similar situation occurred with Final Cut Pro X in 2011, when professionals panned the video editing tool as being inferior to its predecessor. In response, Apple quickly issued an update to reinstate some of the more-requested features, introduced a free trial program and, in some cases, offered refunds to dissatisfied customers.

With Apple making iWork free with the purchase of a new Mac or iOS device, the company is looking to expand the number of people using its productivity products in the face of competition from market leader Microsoft. It should be noted that while some users are vocal about their disdain for the new apps, many others are quite happy, saying the updates offer a more cohesive experience across the Mac and iOS ecosystems.
post #2 of 216
I certainly understand their concern the way I understood FCP and iMovie users not liking how Apple went back to square one with their apps but it's not something they should be complaining about since they can still use iWork '09 apps the same as a week ago.

Personally I like how iWork apps on iCloud and iWork apps on my Mac look similar and work together.
Edited by akqies - 10/29/13 at 12:34am
post #3 of 216
Just stick with the older versions of iWork which do NOT get removed for previous documents. Can't help with loss of data and no back ups however.
post #4 of 216

I like the direction that Apple takes with the new iWork platform. They are going to heavily build upon it adding new features and making sure that now onwards the productivity and creativity suite is going to be fully integrated and cross-device compatible. 

 

I also understand that users are puzzled about the transition. I expected fully compatibility with the old format since I have lots of work done with the former iWork.

 

Apple stripped it for higher purposes? OK then. But why not warning the user when s/he opens an old format and offer the opportunity to create a copy leaving one copy intact, just the way they did on the iOS devices? 

 

Apart from that, I love the new iWork and I am excited to learn what else Apple has up its sleeve. Keep it up Tim, Craig, John and Roger Rosen! :)

post #5 of 216

The Mac sold 4.6M units last quarter, that's over a million a month. And it's still not enough to justify Apple developing a dedicated word processor? All those sales and all we get is a port of the iOS one?

 

This is the second questionable decision by whomever is the software architect for iWork. The first was wasting years of man hours developing a web version, in what has been an app-centric world for several years now (thanks to Apple in fact). *Ring ring* *Ring ring* Hey iWork architect, it's for you! It's the 2000s and they want their web app back.

post #6 of 216
Quote:
Originally Posted by ascii View Post

The Mac sold 4.6M units last quarter, that's over a million a month. And it's still not enough to justify Apple developing a dedicated word processor? All those sales and all we get is a port of the iOS one?

This is the second questionable decision by whomever is the software architect for iWork. The first was wasting years of man hours developing a web version, in what has been an app-centric world for several years now (thanks to Apple in fact). *Ring ring* *Ring ring* Hey iWork architect, it's for you! It's the 2000s and they want their web app back.

What's not dedicated about the iWork for Mac apps? It's definitely not a port of the iPhone app.
post #7 of 216
"I certainly understand their concern the way I understood FCP and iMovie users not liking how Apple went back to square one with their apps but it's not something they should be complaining about since they can still use iWork '09 apps the same as a week ago.%u201D

That%u2019s not true. The new iWorks apps on both OS and IOS are missing signficant number of features. Hence, any previously created document in iWorks 09 using any of those features is now rendered essentially useless once opened in the new apps. For example, the first document I opened in the new IOS version of Pages stripped a number of important tables from the document, simply because the new app lacked those same features. Before I realized what had happened, the document was automatically saved in the new file type making that document unreadable in iWorks 09. Compounding the problem, I have lost the ability to view my existing iWork 09 documents on my iPad (something I could do prior to the intro of these new apps.) That%u2019s a major PITA! So no, I cannot use my iWork 09 apps the same way I used them a week ago.

Apple really fxcked up on this one. The lack of clear communication about the implications of upgrading is rather appalling, especially for a company that seemingly prides itself on customer relations. I guess the %u201CMaps%u201D fiasco was not an anomaly after all.
post #8 of 216
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2stepbay View Post

The new iWorks apps on both OS and IOS are missing signficant number of features. Hence, any previously created document in iWorks 09 using any of those features is now rendered essentially useless once opened in the new apps.

THEN OPEN THEM UP USING iWORK '09!!!!
post #9 of 216
The dumbing down continues. Did apple learn nothing from the FCX fiasco or are they still too arrogant?
post #10 of 216
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2stepbay View Post

"I certainly understand their concern the way I understood FCP and iMovie users not liking how Apple went back to square one with their apps but it's not something they should be complaining about since they can still use iWork '09 apps the same as a week ago.%u201D

That%u2019s not true. The new iWorks apps on both OS and IOS are missing signficant number of features. Hence, any previously created document in iWorks 09 using any of those features is now rendered essentially useless once opened in the new apps. For example, the first document I opened in the new IOS version of Pages stripped a number of important tables from the document, simply because the new app lacked those same features. Before I realized what had happened, the document was automatically saved in the new file type making that document unreadable in iWorks 09. Compounding the problem, I have lost the ability to view my existing iWork 09 documents on my iPad (something I could do prior to the intro of these new apps.) That%u2019s a major PITA! So no, I cannot use my iWork 09 apps the same way I used them a week ago.

Apple really fxcked up on this one. The lack of clear communication about the implications of upgrading is rather appalling, especially for a company that seemingly prides itself on customer relations. I guess the %u201CMaps%u201D fiasco was not an anomaly after all.

 

All that ranting and raving, when you could have simply to used iWork09, as the new apps DO NOT REPLACE THE OLD ONES. I repeat: ALL IWORK 2009 APPS ARE STILL ON YOUR MAC. Jesus Christ, some of you people are unbelievable, attempting to ignore some basic facts and twist reality so you can use the "apple fucked up and ruined my life" narrative. And no, the document didn't "automatically save". That does not happen. You explicitly saved it, and explicitly chose to replace the old one, instead of making a copy, or a million other things that would have exercised some caution. Even if that did happen, you could have (and still can) use time machine to get the older version back. But yeah, keep making shit up, and ignoring obvious and plentiful solutions,  in order to sensationalize the situation. 

post #11 of 216
FCP X is blooming in the right direction. Soon it will surpass FCP 7.x in functionality, never mind already surpassing greatly in workflow.

If this course of action is taken with iWorks then people will stop complaining.

Until then, just use LibreOffice for OS X. Next release will have full OpenGL acceleration across all platforms that matter: OS X/FreeBSD, Linux and Windows.
post #12 of 216
I really wonder how many read through setups, Help & Tips before beginning.
I know side rulers our not included for now! But if they were using Help which opens online
help, theirs a send feedback @ bottom of page & would truly help Apple & they (complainers)
more quickly.

These apps are the 1st step in a new direction and thing will only get better, I'm not sure how long altogether Apple was working on this but if waiting for full feature app we may have been waiting another 8 months.
post #13 of 216
Quote:
Originally Posted by jobsonmyface View Post

The dumbing down continues. Did apple learn nothing from the FCX fiasco or are they still too arrogant?

 

I think they learned to ignore the whining in the internet echo chamber, and carry on rebuilding the product until it is better than the one it replaces.

 

In iWorks, a lot of the functionality is gone, and a lot of it has just moved someplace else.  As many many many others have pointed out  the old apps are still on the machine, so you can carry on using them.

 

What amazes me is all the 'professional' iWork users who are losing business because iWorks is no longer a high-level productivity suite. A week ago, iWorks was nowhere near good enough to replace Word, Excel etc, so where have all these iWork professionals come from all of a sudden?

post #14 of 216
Quote:
Originally Posted by AirBubble View Post

I really wonder how many read through setups, Help & Tips before beginning.
I know side rulers our not included for now! But if they were using Help which opens online
help, theirs a send feedback @ bottom of page & would truly help Apple & they (complainers)
more quickly.

These apps are the 1st step in a new direction and thing will only get better, I'm not sure how long altogether Apple was working on this but if waiting for full feature app we may have been waiting another 8 months.

 

Exactly, and let's not forget that the old apps are still on your Mac.

post #15 of 216
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdriftmeyer View Post

FCP X is blooming in the right direction. Soon it will surpass FCP 7.x in functionality, never mind already surpassing greatly in workflow.

If this course of action is taken with iWorks then people will stop complaining.

Until then, just use LibreOffice for OS X. Next release will have full OpenGL acceleration across all platforms that matter: OS X/FreeBSD, Linux and Windows.

 

Here lyes a major problem for companies and professionals. When Apple is prepared to ditch forward compatibility it will most likely happen again and again. So can you really base your work and business model on a software that might suddenly loose its forward compatibility? What happens to your archived work? You can keep several versions of a software package. OK. But what about automatic software updates?  Where do you get an old packaged when you migrate to a new computer in the days of Appstore? What about if a new version of the OS doesn't allow you to run legacy software anymore? (Anyone already tested FCP Studio on Maverick for that matter? DVD Studio Pro? Color?) 

post #16 of 216
The criticism that one should use the old app is unwarranted.

Why should anyone be reasonably expected to know they should do this? A brand new version was just released. Why would you have any reason to suspect it would render you existing files unusable?

Imagine the LMFAO if Microsoft had done this.

I took one look at the new pages and moved right back. Thankfully I didn't lose any files, but time machine would have had my back, I guess. That's one thing to be thankful for.
post #17 of 216
Quote:
Originally Posted by Slurpy View Post
 

 

All that ranting and raving, when you could have simply to used iWork09, as the new apps DO NOT REPLACE THE OLD ONES. I repeat: ALL IWORK 2009 APPS ARE STILL ON YOUR MAC. Jesus Christ, some of you people are unbelievable, attempting to ignore some basic facts and twist reality so you can use the "apple fucked up and ruined my life" narrative. And no, the document didn't "automatically save". That does not happen. You explicitly saved it, and explicitly chose to replace the old one, instead of making a copy, or a million other things that would have exercised some caution. Even if that did happen, you could have (and still can) use time machine to get the older version back. But yeah, keep making shit up, and ignoring obvious and plentiful solutions,  in order to sensationalize the situation. 

don't be a dick, brosephine. iwork autosaves. 

 

post #18 of 216
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2stepbay View Post

"I certainly understand their concern the way I understood FCP and iMovie users not liking how Apple went back to square one with their apps but it's not something they should be complaining about since they can still use iWork '09 apps the same as a week ago.%u201D

That%u2019s not true. The new iWorks apps on both OS and IOS are missing signficant number of features. Hence, any previously created document in iWorks 09 using any of those features is now rendered essentially useless once opened in the new apps. For example, the first document I opened in the new IOS version of Pages stripped a number of important tables from the document, simply because the new app lacked those same features. Before I realized what had happened, the document was automatically saved in the new file type making that document unreadable in iWorks 09. Compounding the problem, I have lost the ability to view my existing iWork 09 documents on my iPad (something I could do prior to the intro of these new apps.) That%u2019s a major PITA! So no, I cannot use my iWork 09 apps the same way I used them a week ago.

Apple really fxcked up on this one. The lack of clear communication about the implications of upgrading is rather appalling, especially for a company that seemingly prides itself on customer relations. I guess the %u201CMaps%u201D fiasco was not an anomaly after all.

Does the new Pages lose Version?
post #19 of 216
I've been actively participating in the Apple Discussion Forums the past couple days, and I'm shocked at how childish some users can be. The guy who's compiling the list is a level 7 user, and he's been trash talking Apple on his thread, adding hopelessness to the already heated discussion by drawing conclusions about how Apple has abandoned its users and is intentionally damaging their data, AND HE HASN'T EVEN USED THE NEW VERSION! Of course if you try to jump in as the calm voice of reason the angry mob will thrash you. It's obvious they just want to whine and cry like babies.

Here's the kicker. THERE IS NO DATA LOSS!!!

This whole hubbub is for nothing. Sure, features have been removed. But the heat of the argument is over alleged data loss. All one has to do, even without Time Machine, is go to Flie > Revert to > Browse All Versions and you can restore the pre 5.0 version from within 5.0, close it (don't save!) and all is right again. You can delete 5.0 from your system and go back to using '09 with joy and happiness. Once Apple restores all the missing features, which they will do if proper, mature feedback is given, then you can upgrade.

The moral of the story is, test before upgrading, especially if business is on the line, and for goodness sake backup, backup, backup. Oh, and don't be a whiny baby when things go wrong. This is software and it will always have bugs and glitches. ALWAYS.
post #20 of 216
Quote:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Slurpy

don't be a dick, brosephine. iwork autosaves.

Don't be a dick, you can revert to previous versions.
post #21 of 216
Apple doesn't get it. Either backwards compatibility or a file upgrade path are essential for useable and reliable software.
Removal of key features is not an "upgrade" but a downgrade.
There is an Apple history of issuing, rewriting, replacing or abandoning software- Appleworks, FCP, iWork. How many more messages does Apple need to send to pro users that they cannot rely on their software products over time?
In this context, why bother making the new trash can Apple Pro? Who is going to buy it and what Apple software will they run, at risk of application and file death down the road?
Any professional in his right mind now will go with a Windows PC where at least major software vendors such as MS and Adobe do consider backwards compatibility and file upgrade paths as keys to keeping customers (for a price that now seems with paying).
iWork/Pages 5 should never have been released as such, but given a different name. To do so without at least a warning to users of '09 about feature removal and file incompatibility is just plain dishonest.
With billions in (overseas) bank accounts, Apple could spend a little more to understand their customers needs and provide reliable software development paths.
post #22 of 216
Obviously they are trying to achieve synchronicity between the iCloud and off-line applications. It would be impractical to implement the floating inspector in iCloud and they decided, correctly, that the choice of a single interface was advantageous and that iCloud functionality trumped user interface optimization. I prefer the old user interface as well but as soon as iWork/Cloud collaborative editing was released I immediately implemented it at my company and it's already streamlining our workflow for the development of technical documentation. It's a worthwhile trade.
post #23 of 216
This discussion only mentions Pages and Numbers, but the changes to Keynote (which include all of the feature losses and downgrades affecting the others) are even more devastating. The customizable presenter display, long one of the distinguishing features of Keynote, has been rendered all but unusable, and the editing interface much less convenient. It's fine for them to develop an application suite with cross-platform compatibility, but since that means least-common-denominator functionality, why does it have to entail the disappearance of (much used) previous capabilities on more powerful platforms? Why not preserve and improve the old versions as "pro" products without crippling them?
The claim that there's no problem because you can always keep the old versions ignores the facts that (a) there's no way to tell how long those versions wil continue to work, given changes in OS X; (b) there's no easy way to get them for new machines ; and (c) if you have the new version on your system at all, there's no way to make the old one the default app to open Keynote (Pages, Numbers) files.
These are not trivial issues, and responses along the lines of "shut up, suck it up and go with the flow" that I see on this thread are not really appropriate answers to them.
post #24 of 216
Quote:
Originally Posted by Linguist View Post

This discussion only mentions Pages and Numbers, but the changes to Keynote (which include all of the feature losses and downgrades affecting the others) are even more devastating. The customizable presenter display, long one of the distinguishing features of Keynote, has been rendered all but unusable, and the editing interface much less convenient. It's fine for them to develop an application suite with cross-platform compatibility, but since that means least-common-denominator functionality, why does it have to entail the disappearance of (much used) previous capabilities on more powerful platforms? Why not preserve and improve the old versions as "pro" products without crippling them?
The claim that there's no problem because you can always keep the old versions ignores the facts that (a) there's no way to tell how long those versions wil continue to work, given changes in OS X; (b) there's no easy way to get them for new machines ; and (c) if you have the new version on your system at all, there's no way to make the old one the default app to open Keynote (Pages, Numbers) files.
These are not trivial issues, and responses along the lines of "shut up, suck it up and go with the flow" that I see on this thread are not really appropriate answers to them.

Or you can simply uninstall the app, in this case the new Pages/Numbers/Keynote and revert back to the old one which is still on your machine. Don't just drag and drop into the trash bin but also look for system wide files like in /Preferences/Library. 

 

Finally,  if you have a business that depends on such software, no one should update blindly. Be it an OS or individual apps. At the very least do some reading on compatibility issues before making such a move. That may entail a wait of a month or so before upgrading.

post #25 of 216
Mikey, the article needs to be updated. There's no data loss since the autosave feature allows past versions to be restored, even without Time Machine. Please update it so the frenzy of panicked users calms down.
post #26 of 216
Of course I can uninstall the new versions, or just not "upgrade" to them at all. But you haven't told me how to get the old ones for a new machine, or what to do when Apple "uninstalls" the old ones in a future OS X update, or why I should buy into the notion that unlike Micr$oft products, my day to day productivity software won't be seeing any more updates in the future, or why I should be happy that a formerly professional presentation program has been reduced to something suitable for not much more than fifth grade book reports. None of this is inevitable, but it follows from Apple's ongoing dumbing-down of OS X in favor of iOS.
post #27 of 216

Whilst I hope Apple reinstates some of the missing features in Pages and Numbers in the future, overall I am very happy with the new design and the compatibility across OS X, iOS and iCloud.

 

There are always people who baulk at change: they see the threats, not the opportunities.

 

The past is littered with folk who didn't want to move on from MS DOS, Win 3.1/95/98/XP, WordPerfect, AmiPro, etc.

 

The new iWork produces beautiful cross-platform documents, and it fulfils 100% of the needs of 99% of users…and that is a big deal for companies that can now supply their staff with OS and iWork upgrades for free, and without the expense, high-wastage and inefficiency of using MS products.

 

If it doesn't meet your needs for now, use the old iWork or buy other software; and contact Apple with reasoned suggestions for improvements.

 

The furore is childish nonsense. I hope Tim Cook tells people to stop whining, to stop hankering for the past, and to wise up to the opportunities of the future.

 

And remember, employment is just like natural selection: if you can't (or won't) adapt to new ways of working, your company can easily find people who can. There are a ton of young people coming into the marketplace who have grown up with iPods and iPhones and Apple's simple way of doing things. They will embrace the new iWork in an instant, at which point the naysayers will be history only.

 

There is no glory or future in being a Luddite. 

post #28 of 216
Quote:
Originally Posted by Linguist View Post

Of course I can uninstall the new versions, or just not "upgrade" to them at all. But you haven't told me how to get the old ones for a new machine, or what to do when Apple "uninstalls" the old ones in a future OS X update, or why I should buy into the notion that unlike Micr$oft products, my day to day productivity software won't be seeing any more updates in the future, or why I should be happy that a formerly professional presentation program has been reduced to something suitable for not much more than fifth grade book reports. None of this is inevitable, but it follows from Apple's ongoing dumbing-down of OS X in favor of iOS.

You can get the old version for a new machine by using the Migration Assistant when you set the new machine up, or even afterward by dragging the application over File Sharing from the old machine, or a Time Machine backup.  Apple will never remove the old version or files.  They will always be there.  

 

iWork was rewritten to achieve parity on a roadmap to the future.  It was critical and necessary.  Like FCPX, the features will be restored in time and until then, '09 will continue to function normally.  Nothing is lost.

post #29 of 216

I'm very happy to see that my voice is one amongst the multitude... So many issues with the new iWork update. I purposely abandoned Microsoft Office a long time ago. As an instructor of college English, iWork does everything I need and, indeed, does things that Office couldn't handle. All my grade books and attendance rosters translated fine, my presentations for lecture content in Keynote translated without issue as well... My beef is with Pages. I can no longer make comments in the margins and .pdf the work to return to my students. All my online coursework and other work I receive electronically now needs to be handled through Office and Word so I can make it happen. If I REALLY want to inconvenience myself and jump through hoops, I can be home on my MacBook and download all the papers to work on and place them in cloud storage, then while I'm mobile I can use Pages in my iPad to critique them and e-mail them to a different account as Word documents (so the comments still show up) and then go home to .pdf them from there and then send them out. But with a full course load, who the #%@^ has time for that kind of nonsense!?!

 

The inspector is an issue as well, as it seems like it does less on my initial review of it.

 

The application worked SO WELL for so long that to lose it's functionality at the cost of creating a streamlined experience across the OSX and iOS platforms breaks my heart. Now, to be truly mobile again, I need to invest in a portable Windows environment (until Pages for iOS has all the functionality the old Pages for OSX did, or at least until the functionality is returned to Pages on OSX. Grr, snarl, spit spit hiss growl roar! I never, never thought Apple would drive me back into the arms of Microsoft for functionality, but soon I'll have to carry a surface an an iPad to class. Joy...

post #30 of 216
I'm not criticising Apple for starting again from scratch and ensuring feature parity with iCloud and iOS as a top priority...these are great things for which they should be commended, but...

If you're going to put out a clearly unfinished product be open and honest about that and don't try to pass it off as an upgrade until it's ready! Call it a beta and people will be much more forgiving and probably even more willing to help in the development process by way of feedback and feature requests.

It's just astonishing to me that it's now the third time in as many years they've made exactly the same mistake, even more so now with the benefit of hindsight regarding the FCP X and Maps fiascos.

Is it that hard for them to say: "We love iWork but sometimes you have to start again and we wanted to make a suite that has feature parity across all your Macs, devices and the web. It's not ready yet but we're offering a free public beta of the new iWork for OS X today and we'd love to work with you to make it the best possible platform to get work done as quickly, easily and fun as possible."

Seriously is that so freaking hard??? Or is that not arrogant enough for Apple these days?
Edited by s.metcalf - 10/29/13 at 5:03am
post #31 of 216

I agree that the new iWork programs are a great improvement on the previous ones. I think they've made the interface much simpler and easier to use. The side panel tool bar is an excellent development. I genuinely think Pages and Keynote are now better than Microsoft PowerPoint precisely because they have been simplified. I was able to create a brand new presentation so much faster than before.   

 

The seamless experience across platforms via iCloud is excellent. I love the ability to review the same document on my iPhone, iPad and Mac.  

 

What all the negativity makes me realise is that iWork is hugely important. i think people want an alternative to Office. Office was great 10 years ago. Today it has become bloated with features that 99% of users seldom use. We really needed something brand new built from the ground up. 

 

I wonder if all this rubbish comes from Microsoft people who have been instructed to rubbish iWork merely to protect Office?

post #32 of 216

I think AI needed a story because because of a slow news cycle. They don't have any scalpers waiting in line at the Apple Store to cover yet?

post #33 of 216

What if I only have the new version (because I'm a new Mac user) and someone wants me to read a file created with the old version?

post #34 of 216
Software developers should be shot for removing functionality in new versions of software.
If car companies did this, they'd be out of business. Imagine the new version of your car, which has all the mod-cons, minus ABS or airbags or cruise control etc...
post #35 of 216
Quote:
Originally Posted by runbuh View Post
 

What if I only have the new version (because I'm a new Mac user) and someone wants me to read a file created with the old version?

In that case you'll have to find a copy of the old version.  Or have them export it as a PDF or .doc

post #36 of 216
I think this "fiasco" comes down to two issues.

1/. Communication. Users shouldn't have had to discover by using the app upgrades that things have changed. There should have been indications at the app launch event that there would be some differences in functionality. Maybe the software should have been designated a new name. The iWork for iOS updates that came bundled with 7.0.3 should have been optional. When opening old version files, the new app could have listed in a dialog box which features in the opened file it no longer supported and allowed a user to bail out.

Making things worse is the silent treatment Apple gives its customers; seemingly priding itself on its policies of not commenting or responding.

Let's get one thing straight: this is not The Acme Computer Company we're talking about here. This is Apple. One of the most profitable companies in the world. They could "personally respond" to every email, gripe and feature request... if they really wanted to.

2/. Trust. When people and companies adopt a given software application, they literally invest in it; in both time and money. It's a commitment that should be honoured. Apple depended on pro users who saw the company through its darkest times... then rewarded them by dropping support for things like Final Cut Server. Again, Apple has more than enough money in the bank to keep supporting-- and developing!-- older versions of software applications like FCP7 and even iWork 09... to make a firm commitment to its loyal users that their investment in Apple products is safe into the future.

My livelihood depends on Keynote. When features I depend on are removed I get nervous. I start to worry that I might be left high and dry. Sure, I can use the legacy versions of the software... but for how long? These are not things I should be feeling. Without trust, a brand is nothing.
post #37 of 216
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdriftmeyer View Post

FCP X is blooming in the right direction. Soon it will surpass FCP 7.x in functionality, never mind already surpassing greatly in workflow.

If this course of action is taken with iWorks then people will stop complaining.

Until then, just use LibreOffice for OS X. Next release will have full OpenGL acceleration across all platforms that matter: OS X/FreeBSD, Linux and Windows.

Or just use iWork '9 as well when needed. When not needed, the new features in '13 are pretty cool. Now the cross platform and collaboration base is there they can move forward and I agree, we'll see these apps gain back what's lost and more.

The comparison with FCPro X does have one problem, it's called iMovie. iWork is more akin to iLife ... so for a good comparison we need the equivalent Pro apps or at least Numbers Pro (not sure Keynote needs it) and Pages Pro, to that mix I'd add a Pro database and web development app. Maybe time to bring Claris (sorry, Filemaker) back into the fold and perhaps buy Hype.
Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
nMac Pro 6 Core, MacBookPro i7, MacBookPro i5, iPhones 5 and 5s, iPad Air, 2013 Mac mini, SE30, IIFx, Towers; G4 & G3.
Reply
Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
nMac Pro 6 Core, MacBookPro i7, MacBookPro i5, iPhones 5 and 5s, iPad Air, 2013 Mac mini, SE30, IIFx, Towers; G4 & G3.
Reply
post #38 of 216
Quote:
Originally Posted by runbuh View Post

What if I only have the new version (because I'm a new Mac user) and someone wants me to read a file created with the old version?

'13 opens '9 albeit it will remove linked text and unsupported features. So having both versions for now seems the best option.
Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
nMac Pro 6 Core, MacBookPro i7, MacBookPro i5, iPhones 5 and 5s, iPad Air, 2013 Mac mini, SE30, IIFx, Towers; G4 & G3.
Reply
Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
nMac Pro 6 Core, MacBookPro i7, MacBookPro i5, iPhones 5 and 5s, iPad Air, 2013 Mac mini, SE30, IIFx, Towers; G4 & G3.
Reply
post #39 of 216
It is interesting the radical perspective people have here, For example Maps was never a fiasco, it has worked perfectly fine for me from day one.

The problem here is that people only see their perspective. Nor do they realize this is a way forward not a dead end. In reality Apple has given us, in part, what many of us have been asking for. That is file compatibility no matter what platform. Sure more features are better than less, but a completely refactored product has to start some where.

I have to agree with many here people like to whine rather than think.
post #40 of 216
Quote:

Originally Posted by robogobo View Post

 

... iWork was rewritten to achieve parity on a roadmap to the future.  It was critical and necessary.  Like FCPX, the features will be restored in time and until then, '09 will continue to function normally.  Nothing is lost.

 

Nothing is lost? Our Media and Film University where I sometimes give lectures has migrated completely away from Final Cut Studio to Adobe and Avid products. Why not FCPX? For the simple reason that you can't educate future industry professionals on a tool that might not exist anymore when they graduate in 3 years. I'm talking about several hundred graduates each year in out city alone. Btw. Final Cut Studio was besides Logic the main reason creative people work on Apple computers. When you go Adobe you can as well use a window machine. And thats what a lot of students are now doing

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Mac Software
AppleInsider › Forums › Software › Mac Software › Apple faces backlash over missing, changed functions in iWork revamp