or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › Mac Hardware › Current Mac Hardware › Apple faces class action suit over allegedly defective iMac displays
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Apple faces class action suit over allegedly defective iMac displays

post #1 of 30
Thread Starter 
Another class action suit has been brought against Apple, this time alleging the company knew about, but did not address, a fault with displays in the previous generation of 27-inch iMac desktops.

iMac


Corbin Rasmussen, of Idaho Falls, Idaho, says in the complaint that his 27-inch iMac began to experience trouble with the display 18 months after purchase. Specifically, half of the display went dark, which Rasmussen says impacted his use of the computer for things like watching movies or web browsing. The suit was first noticed by GigaOM.

After examining the computer, Rasmussen claims that Apple told him a repair would run $500 because the desktop was out of warranty. Rasmussen believes Apple should offer free repairs for the product, pointing to a 300-page-long thread on Apple's user-to-user support forums as evidence that the problem is widespread enough to warrant special action.

"Despite numerous complaints mounting in Apple's online forums and lodged with Apple Care customer service representatives, Apple has refused to publicly acknoledge the screen dimming defect," the complaint says, "and has failed to stand behind its representations and products and offer a fix for impacted consumers."

Rasumussen also cites a 2009 Techcrunch report that called the iMac an "iLemon," and seeks to represent all owners of 27-inch iMacs featuring LED-backlit displays from South Korean manufacturer LG made prior to December 2012. The case, the complaint says, may be worth more than $5 million.

post #2 of 30
Shit happened 18 months after purchase... that's what AppleCare is for. Cheap bastard thought he'd save a couple hundred and not have to pay $500 in repairs. Truth is, he gambled and lost... with Apple is was a pretty safe bet that the equipment wouldn't fail, but it was a gamble just the same. Now he wants the AppleCare coverage he failed to buy.
post #3 of 30
Get Applecare!

Long FB, AMZN
Schlong AAPL

Reply

Long FB, AMZN
Schlong AAPL

Reply
post #4 of 30
If he win, then warranty means nothing and you can sue everyone whenever your device fail?
post #5 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

After examining the computer, Rasmussen claims that Apple told him a repair would run $500 because the desktop was out of warranty. Rasmussen believes Apple should offer free repairs for the product...


Screw you buddy!  Why should ANY manufacturer be obliged to continue fixing products out of warranty?  I think Apple goes way more out of their way to fix/replace items that did exceed their warranty period but they certainly are not obligated to.

That's what AppleCare is for.  Idiot.  Moron.  Sure, extended warranties in general I think are a scam, but I think what one gets with a bonafide AppleCare plan, it's worth it considering how expensive those iMacs are.

Written on my trusty 2009-iMac.

post #6 of 30

Fixed a 24 inch Apple LED Cinema Display with a LG panel. The solder on one of the backlight LEDs had cracked and the entire LED came off, disabling the entire backlight system. Joys of lead-free solder.

post #7 of 30

We just repaired one of these at our office last week, a mid-2011 model. The actual part that breaks when this fails is VERY poorly designed and thought out. This isn't just a case of trying to get around a warranty, Apple should not have built it the way they did. A class action lawsuit like this is meant to encourage a company to make smart choices when making a poor one hurts users.

 

He's not just complaining. My iMac is fantastic, but that power connector was really stupid. Don't do it again, Apple.

post #8 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by konqerror View Post

Fixed a 24 inch Apple LED Cinema Display with a LG panel. The solder on one of the backlight LEDs had cracked and the entire LED came off, disabling the entire backlight system. Joys of lead-free solder.

Weren't early LG panels used in iPads prone to a light leakage problem?

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
Reply

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
Reply
post #9 of 30
Good luck buddy. After the way Apple squashed the faulty sleep/wake button lawsuit, it's pretty clear that doing the right thing isn't in Apple's playbook anymore.

Besides that, 500 bucks to replace a 2 year old screen? That's beyond ridiculous. Maybe if it were from the current gen, considering how hard the stupid things are to remove and replace, but the previous gen took maybe a half hour to swap out panels.
post #10 of 30
I've always felt that a 12 month warranty on a premium priced product was unreasonable. Should really be 24 months minimum, if this happens to anyone in the UK know that you are covered by the sales of goods act, do not let Apple fob you off!
iPad, Macbook Pro, iPhone, heck I even have iLife! :-)
Reply
iPad, Macbook Pro, iPhone, heck I even have iLife! :-)
Reply
post #11 of 30
If he wins, he'll get a $5 gift card. His lawyer will get a couple million $.
post #12 of 30

I can't understand why people pile on Apple whenever their product goes bad out of warranty. Apple has surprised the hell out of me with two incidents that happened during the past few years:

 

1) In 2011, Apple notified me by mail that our iPod Nano, purchased in 2006 had battery issues. They asked me to send it back and they would 'rectify the situation'. We hardly used that iPod anymore, so I sent it back. A few weeks later, we received a brand new Nano, their latest model to replace our old one. 

 

2) Last year, I received a note from Apple in the mail that my iMac model was experiencing hard drive failures. If I took the Mac to an authorized service, they would replace the drive with a brand new one at no cost. 

 

This is the Apple that I know, that I invest in, and that I admire. They really care about their customers. Buy Applecare, play by the rules, and all should be fine.


Edited by flipkal - 10/29/13 at 5:06pm
post #13 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by jungmark View Post

If he wins, he'll get a $5 gift card. His lawyer will get a couple million $.

Unless of course he is a lawyer or has a close relative that is.

This is perhaps the biggest problem with this issue. Right or wrong with his demands the lawyers win.
post #14 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by flipkal View Post

I can't understand why people pile on Apple whenever their product goes bad out of warranty.
If the product was defective at the time of manufacture then he may have an argument if Apple actually knew that device was defective. The thing is you would need evidence that Apple knowingly shipped defective product when it released the hardware. Not so easy to prove and more than likely not the case.
Quote:
Apple has surprised the hell out of me with two incidents that happened during the past few years:

1) In 2011, Apple notified me by mail that our iPod Nano, purchased in 2006 had battery issues. They asked me to send it back and they would 'rectify the situation'. We hardly used that iPod anymore, so I sent it back. A few weeks later, we received a brand new Nano, their latest model to replace our old one. 

2) Last year, I received a note from Apple in the mail that my iMac model was experiencing hard drive failures. If I took the Mac to an authorized service, they would replace the drive with a brand new one at no cost. 

This is the Apple that I know, that I invest in, and that I admire. They really card about their customers. Buy Applecare, play by the rules, and all should be fine.

I'm not even sure AppleCare is justified in this case. I have to wonder if he considered a DIY repair or taking it to a third part maintenance organization.
post #15 of 30

I don't buy AppleCare BECAUSE I'm buying an Apple product that I expect to be as well made as any luxury product. I used to buy AppleCare and never used it after spending all of that money for it.

 

The extended warranty industry is as much of a scam as pay day loans. Those defective displays are from no fault of the user and Apple needs to fix them before they tarnish their image.

post #16 of 30
I agree with saarek. One year warranty is not enough, it should be two years as we pay the premium price for premium product which deserve to have a premium warranty. Every manufacturers whether its Panasonic, Samsung, Sony, LG, they all have standard 1 year warranty on their products. Apple's computer are undoubtedly way better than any other in the market today and if one would pay an extra hard-earned cash to get the premium product, it deserve to have an advantage for a longer peace of mind, means better coverage/warranty

I bought 7 Macs from Mac Pro to MacBook Air until now, none of them I got Apple Care. Luckily not experienced any issue with any of my Apple products but still I did not have the peace of mind longer than one year and that was not enough.

I am again willing to buy new Mac Pro but if I am already paying Apple more than $3K for their premium product, it should automatically at least give me two year full replacement warranty, in fact, three years to be fair.

..and since the failure rate for Apple products are far less than others, Apple should not have this issue to give 2 years warranty instead of one.

Its just my opinion.
Edited by Aegean - 10/29/13 at 5:16pm
post #17 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aegean View Post

I agree with saarek. One year warranty is not enough, it should be two years as we pay the premium price for premium product which deserve to have a premium warranty….. Its just my opinion.

Consider a couple of things here. First, what is this “premium price” you think you are paying? Do you REALLY think you are paying “premium” prices for the hardware and software alone? I don’t. I think you’re getting tremendous value, because it INCLUDES world-class support built into it, for an entire year (or more, in some places), at a very fair price. How can you justify doubling that warranty period at no charge?

And for an equally fair price, they offer 3 full years of warranty support. Who else does that? And it’s not just “support”, it’s the best on the planet, consistently gaining higher marks than anyone else in their industries, and then some.

Dollar for dollar, feature for feature, spec for spec, Apple products are NOT that much more expensive than their apples-to-apples-compared competition, and that SMALL “premium” pays for the top-flight support you get.

Consider the quality of Apple’s warranty/after-sales support. Do you think the quality of support would be maintained if it was a “free two years”? I think their warrant programs are very fair. Especially considering the extremely low failure rate of their products.

It’s just my opinion.
post #18 of 30

Agreed, 1 year is a little short considering the price.

Oh hang on, I'm in the UK so I get 2 years anyway.

At least the EU can do something right.

post #19 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by diggydobby View Post

If he win, then warranty means nothing and you can sue everyone whenever your device fail?

 


You can already sue anyone for anything.
Doesn't mean you have a case or will win.
post #20 of 30
I actually went thru this exact thing 10 months ago, i had it repaired and the display was replaced but the same exact thing started happening 2 weeks ago. I didnt buy Applecare not to be cheap (its a $3,500 maxed out imac) but because i maxed out my credit card to buy it, i actually had apple executive relations get involve and they paid for the repair at a certified shop.

At the shop i was told that the LED connection on the lower left of the display looks like it was soldered by a 5 year old and that the new part didnt look that much better but it worked, i never had a problem with any apple products and i always buy applecare that was the first time i didnt get it.

Im currently speaking directly with an Apple executive relations rep who helped me get it repaired last time but this time this im asking them to take a recall of the display into consideration.

Also to those who say just get applecare, with or without it this is a faulty not well manufactured display (likely not apples fault but the manufactures) even if i had applecare i wouldnt want to take my bread and butter mac to the shop for a week to get it repaired once a year, what about after apple care expires? Does that mean the product shouldnt work? I had a mac for 5 years without a hiccup and i expect even more from this one, i still have and ipod thats about 7 years old and works like a charm, when a product is bad like this one its supposed to be recalled, they have recalled hard drives and other parts, again even with applecare many people have experienced this issue within the first year and thats not fair to bave to bring it in for a week to repair it once a year.

Just my thoughts
post #21 of 30
post #22 of 30

Actually apple offered to fix my mac for free even after warranty here in India since it never broke down during warranty.

He might be onto something.

post #23 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post


Weren't early LG panels used in iPads prone to a light leakage problem?

And their Macbook Pro retina displays (1st gen) had ghosting problems (I know because I own one). They have had a bad reputation ever since the old days when they were called Lucky Goldstar, and corporate culture takes a long time to change, I wish Apple wouldn't use them as a supplier.

post #24 of 30

Hey, fix the damn screens!

 

If a companies flagship product has over a certain number of defective screens, they should be replaced - like Apple did recently w/ their Seagate replace drive program

 

And what if a reportedly defective part breaks right AFTER 3 years?  What would you say, or do? 

 

 

 

post #25 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by techer View Post
...

And what if a reportedly defective part breaks right AFTER 3 years?  What would you say, or do? 

 

 

 


Warranty expired on a Sunday, user came to me Monday, I called Dell and they said sorry.

post #26 of 30
Originally Posted by techer View Post
And what if a reportedly defective part breaks right AFTER 3 years?  What would you say, or do? 

 

Case by case.

Originally Posted by asdasd

This is Appleinsider. It's all there for you but we can't do it for you.
Reply

Originally Posted by asdasd

This is Appleinsider. It's all there for you but we can't do it for you.
Reply
post #27 of 30

More power to Corbin Rasmussen and his class action lawsuit.

 

Is the ball now in Apple's court, so to speak? 

post #28 of 30
Sorry, I agree with this guy over this class action lawsuit. Apple clearly knows there is a problem with the displays on the iMacs. I myself have returned a machine because of the LCD panel looking cloudy and "dirty", and Apple's response was to replace my whole machine? The first time I caught it before the warranty was up, but on my current machine I caught it about a month after the warranty ran out.

There's no doubt these parts are defective; I can understand normal wear-and-tear failure like hard drive issues or inverter problems (which that is also seemingly needing to be replaced on my machine as well) not being addressed when out of warranty or during AppleCare, but it shouldn't be necessary for me to spend an additional couple of hundred dollars on a supposedly top-of-the-line model I've already spent close to $2,000 on. The LCD panel, of all things, should work, and not "burn in" or fail as I've seen in barely a year, especially when some of us take more care than others in making sure it isn't used incorrectly.

Sign me up. I'd join this class-action in a heartbeat, in hopes that it turns to a recall at the very least.
post #29 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aegean View Post

One year warranty is not enough, it should be two years as we pay the premium price for premium product which deserve to have a premium warranty.

Indeed. EU put pressure lately on Apple to extend its warranty to two years, according to European law valid for every company selling products on its territory. The move followed the aggressive Italian policy on the issue, that threatened to completely shut down Apple business in Italy and impose hefty fines. Belgium followed, and according to reports other European countries also. About time.

post #30 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by flipkal View Post
 

I can't understand why people pile on Apple whenever their product goes bad out of warranty. Apple has surprised the hell out of me with two incidents that happened during the past few years:

 

1) In 2011, Apple notified me by mail that our iPod Nano, purchased in 2006 had battery issues. They asked me to send it back and they would 'rectify the situation'. We hardly used that iPod anymore, so I sent it back. A few weeks later, we received a brand new Nano, their latest model to replace our old one. 

 

2) Last year, I received a note from Apple in the mail that my iMac model was experiencing hard drive failures. If I took the Mac to an authorized service, they would replace the drive with a brand new one at no cost. 

 

This is the Apple that I know, that I invest in, and that I admire. They really care about their customers. Buy Applecare, play by the rules, and all should be fine.

 

I don't know that it's any more about piling on than it's about people being apologists for Apple, whether there is a real issue to be looked at or not. It most definitely is worth looking at, right? While I have been an Apple customer and "fan" since the mid 1980's, I also realize that it is a for-profit company, not so different from any other for-profit company. And its interests and my interests (as a consumer) might not always be the same. As an AAPL shareholder, I want them to maximize profits and minimize losses and expenses. With my employer, that is one of my primary duties. So I understand and accept that. Because they make a mint selling RAM, I understand why they keep their RAM sealed away and make it virtually impossible to boost the memory on many/most products these days. Hey, if I had that half-human vampire, Carl Icahn, wanting to "have dinner" with me every other week, I'd probably make the computers run on some oddball voltage and make you buy a $500 converter that only we sold. Need to charge your $100 iPod Nano? Sure. But the converter is still $500. Anything to make enough money to get Creepy Cousin Carl off my back! But jokes aside, if and when Apple becomes aware of systemically defective components, I do think the company could do a MUCH better job of communicating that to its customers.

 

While you apparently got a note from Apple concerning your iMac's hard drive, I got no such note about my defective AMD Radeon HD 6970M graphics card. I happened across the information on my Google News Apple feed. Luckily, by the time the main display started acting up (and finally died altogether), I knew what was happening and I was able to still use the Thunderbolt display to save a project I had not yet completed. I got the computer to an authorized service center, which informed me that one reason I probably had to find out on my own was Apple tends not to call its recalls "recalls" for legal and PR reasons. It's more like, "uh oh... so you found the problem that we knew we had - well, don't worry, we'll take care of that for you at no charge." That is not cool at all. But look, I feel that I'm a reasonable person. I don't look for and I don't need a free lunch. And having worked in various areas of manufacturing related Fortune 500 companies for 20 years or so, I know that no manufacturing process is or can be completely defect free. And I feel that of the consumer related companies that I have bought products from, Apple really is one of the best when it comes to customer service. The people I spoke with at Apple were nothing but helpful and polite. And I appreciated that. But I would not be so pleased if I hadn't come across this AMD graphics card problem beforehand and I'd been caught by surprise.

 

BTW, while repairing my computer's dud AMD graphics card, they found that my hard drive was also in the process of dying a slow death. Either under the AppleCare warranty that I bought or under some other unknown "replacement" program, they replaced that for free too. The computer runs like new again. And that's great. But I better not find out that on top of every other problem this computer has experienced, I NOW have a display problem that Apple or LG knew they had, but someone, somewhere thought it better to speak no evil, see no evil, hear no evil. I bought my 27 inch iMac about the same time as this Rasmussen fellow. I'll be covered by AppleCare for another year or so. So I'll have gotten good use out of this thing as long as it lasts at least that long. But I will follow this lawsuit just to see what the courts find out. I would be genuinely saddened to learn that Apple's rep for "it just works" is built on the early days, when I first walked in an Apple reseller's doors to buy my first Mac Plus, but now no longer means much. I hope that's not the case and doesn't ever come to pass - just in the name of turning a buck.


Edited by Jag_Warrior - 12/22/13 at 12:14am
If two people always agree, then one of them is redundant.
Reply
If two people always agree, then one of them is redundant.
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Current Mac Hardware
AppleInsider › Forums › Mac Hardware › Current Mac Hardware › Apple faces class action suit over allegedly defective iMac displays