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Apple Maps took around 80 percent of Google Maps' iOS traffic in one year

post #1 of 218
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One year after the release of Apple's own iOS 6 mapping service, user data continues to show a precipitous decline in Google Maps among iOS users.



A report by Charles Arthur for The Guardian outlined new data from comScore, arriving at the same conclusion reached by AppleInsider last month:

The majority of iOS users are continuing to use Apple's Maps, while less than half of all smartphone users are using Google Maps. And despite the release of a competing, native Google Maps client app for iOS, it appears that most users are not actually seeking out alternatives, as the tech media has often assumed to be the case.The majority of iOS users are continuing to use Apple's Maps, while less than half of all smartphone users are using Google Maps

Even when including Google's own Android platform into the mix, Apple Maps has had a devastating impact on Google Maps. One year ago, Arthur stated, citing comScore data, 81.1 million were using Google for mapping out of a total population of 103.6 Android and iOS users.

The latest September data shows that just 58.7 million are still using Google's product, despite the total installed base having grown significantly to 136.7 million.

That's a shift from over 78 percent of all Android and iOS mobile users on Google Maps to just short of 43 percent in one year. On iOS, 35 million users pulled up Apple Maps in the month, out of a total population of 60.1 million users: more than 58 percent.

Arthur stated that iOS users accessing Google Maps fell from a peak of 35 million last September to around 6.3 million today, a decrease of more than 80 percent of Google's users.

Data from comScore indicates Apple's users interact with Maps more often (9.7 million iOS users access Maps each day, compared to just 7.2 million for Android) and spend more time in mapping apps: 75.5 minutes per month on average, compared to 56.2 on Android.

Google Maps vs Facebook


Another factor both map services face: younger people statistically make less use of mobile map apps. On top of that, comScore indicates that the release of iOS 6 last year effectively helped to erase six months of Google's user growth, despite incessant complaints about flaws in Apple's 1.0 release, some of which continue to persist one year later.

Apple is working to improve its maps product, having acquired a number of startups related to transit directions (including Locationary, HopStop, and Embark) and interior mapping with WiFiSLAM, dovetailing with the company's own iBeacons microlocation technology.

It has also worked to deliver 3D Flyover as a compelling visualization for both iOS mobile users and desktop Mac users, with the release Maps for OS X Mavericks and system-wide integration with Data Detectors.

Apple's Maps are also a strategic component of the company's plans for iOS in the Car, slated to begin rolling out on new cars in 2014. Apple's chief executive Tim Cook called the auto initiative a "key focus" for the company.
post #2 of 218

Queue all the "Apple maps made me get lost" idiots

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post #3 of 218
Quote:
Originally Posted by GadgetCanadaV2 View Post
 

Queue all the "Apple maps made me get lost" idiots

Count me in that queue.  Still have issues with nonexistent points of interest with Apple maps.

post #4 of 218

wow.  Google should really learn how to play nice.  If they remained happy with offering internet services they would do very well.  A Google services + Apple hardware + iOS is a dream machine.

 

But Google got greedy and stabbed Apple in the back with Android.  Then they buy Motorola to build phones.  Now Apple will begin taking away Google services from iOS devices one app at a time.  Its only a matter of time that Apple switches out Google search.  Bottom line is Google dipping into hardware/mobile OS platforms have not netted them any money.  In fact they are losing over a billion dollars a year on Motorola and probably tens of millions from all the iOS users leaving Google Maps.  Once Apple finds a suitable replacement for Google search or strenthens Siri's usability they will be toast. 

 

Instead of worring about hardware/OS Google should have concentrated on search/ads.  Now we have Facebook and Twitter coming into play.  iRadio.  Ect.  All these will be begin pealing away search dollars.

post #5 of 218

I'm not surprised by this result in the US market, but it would be interesting to know how it looks elsewhere. I am curious exactly how these data were derived though, and what the estimated error might be.

post #6 of 218
Quote:
Originally Posted by msuberly View Post
 

Count me in that queue.  Still have issues with nonexistent points of interest with Apple maps.

 

Lesson:  Don't live in Afganastan

post #7 of 218
Quote:
Originally Posted by sog35 View Post
 

 

Lesson:  Don't live in Afganastan

Sometimes the Air Force sends me to Afghanistan, but I have never tried to use Apple maps there.

 

Happy Veterans Day/Armistice Day.

post #8 of 218
I hope iOS In The Car is just the first step toward an iCar. At some point Apple should control the entire experience instead of putting lipstick on the pig of what the driving UI is—essentially unchanged since the days of Henry Ford.
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post #9 of 218
I'm not surprised at all. Apple Maps was a better solution for me right out if the box. Most of the whine seemed to come from people with low opinions if themselves. Either that or they where expecting an exact copy of GoogleMaps
post #10 of 218
I'll start using Apple Maps when they figure out the old Bay Bridge from Oakland to Yerba Buena hasn't been in use for quite some time now.
post #11 of 218

We did a silly search yesterday and found something interesting.

 

Living in New Plymouth, New Zealand we looked up how long it would take us to walk from New Plymouth to the gas works in Kapuni. Google Maps said 13 hours something but took us down the main road to get there.

 

However, Apple Maps cut us through Mount Egmont National Park and dropped 15 minutes. Apple Maps wins because A) it's a straight line, B) it's a far more beautiful walk.

post #12 of 218
Quote:
Originally Posted by sog35 View Post
 Its only a matter of time that Apple switches out Google search.

 

SIRI uses Bing now.

post #13 of 218
Quote:
Originally Posted by multifoiled View Post

I'll start using Apple Maps when they figure out the old Bay Bridge from Oakland to Yerba Buena hasn't been in use for quite some time now.

i agree. i drove from san francisco to the east bay just yesterday and, thanks to apple maps, i ended up on the *old* span. i mean, really, c'mon apple.
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post #14 of 218
Quote:
Originally Posted by sog35 View Post

wow.  Google should really learn how to play nice.  If they remained happy with offering internet services they would do very well.  A Google services + Apple hardware + iOS is a dream machine.

But Google got greedy and stabbed Apple in the back with Android.  Then they buy Motorola to build phones.  Now Apple will begin taking away Google services from iOS devices one app at a time.  Its only a matter of time that Apple switches out Google search.  Bottom line is Google dipping into hardware/mobile OS platforms have not netted them any money.  In fact they are losing over a billion dollars a year on Motorola and probably tens of millions from all the iOS users leaving Google Maps.  Once Apple finds a suitable replacement for Google search or strenthens Siri's usability they will be toast. 

Instead of worring about hardware/OS Google should have concentrated on search/ads.  Now we have Facebook and Twitter coming into play.  iRadio.  Ect.  All these will be begin pealing away search dollars.

Do you think Apple would be trying to integrate their own profitable services to replace Google ones anyway no matter what Google did or didn't do? Apple has a history of creating their own baked-in features to replace popular 3rd party ones, not that there's anything surprising about that. IMO Apple would be replacing Google services anyway as they saw opportunities for more profit, just perhaps not as quickly as they recently have.
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post #15 of 218
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robin Huber View Post

I hope iOS In The Car is just the first step toward an iCar. At some point Apple should control the entire experience instead of putting lipstick on the pig of what the driving UI is—essentially unchanged since the days of Henry Ford.

Oh, goody.  An Apple car.

 

It's an all new product, so you can't expect it to have everything.  Door handles on the inside will be added within the first six months.

post #16 of 218
I am an iOS user and love the products and apps. but I'm still stunned by how powerfully the iOS user base is as a force.

If I were Google, I'd be ruing ever going ahead with Android. The results have got to been a net lose.
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post #17 of 218
Quote:
Originally Posted by Conrail View Post

Oh, goody.  An Apple car.

It's an all new product, so you can't expect it to have everything.  Door handles on the inside will be added within the first six months.

Or the gas pedal could suddenly just disappear during a "upgrade."
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post #18 of 218
I think there's a significant number of people who still use Google maps but just don't bother to install the app. These numbers are for app usage only. I for one still use Google's mapping service but usually do it over Safari rather then the app. I installed the app after Google updated it but it still lacked a bunch of features on the web version and I thought it was clunky.
post #19 of 218
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pooch View Post

i agree. i drove from san francisco to the east bay just yesterday and, thanks to apple maps, i ended up on the *old* span. i mean, really, c'mon apple.

The street configuration in the west end of Lake Merritt just a few miles from the bridge is also completely wrong even though it's been different for well over a year. Is that a valid complaint or were you just hoping to sound witty on the Internet?
post #20 of 218
Quote:
Originally Posted by Conrail View Post
 

Oh, goody.  An Apple car.

 

It's an all new product, so you can't expect it to have everything.  Door handles on the inside will be added within the first six months.

 

What an insightful post. I look forward to such future drivel from you. 

 

In all honesty, what new product has "everything"? Please point me to this mythical product that pulls every single possible feature from the future, so that no new version ever needs to be made, and it remains future-proof forever. 

 

Re the topic, good. Apple maps has improved significantly, and will obviously keep getting better and adding more features. I expect public transmit to be added  in 2014. 

post #21 of 218
Quote:
Originally Posted by muppetry View Post

I'm not surprised by this result in the US market, but it would be interesting to know how it looks elsewhere. I am curious exactly how these data were derived though, and what the estimated error might be.

Probably more to do with Apple Maps being the default. Besides "geek customizers" I doubt a high number of iPhone/iPad users change over to something replacing what their device came pre-installed with.
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post #22 of 218
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

Do you think Apple would be trying to integrate their own profitable services to replace Google ones anyway no matter what Google did or didn't do? Apple has a history of creating their own baked-in features to replace popular 3rd party ones, not that there's anything surprising about that. IMO Apple would be replacing Google services anyway as they saw opportunities for more profit, just perhaps not as quickly as they recently have.

I think when Jobs met with Schmidt for lunch, he may have offered a deal to keep Google in play as a permanent partner on the platform. He would have had something to offer Schmidt during that meeting. Schmidt walked away from it, so we'll never know.
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post #23 of 218
This goes to show you that apple maps is superior to google maps.
post #24 of 218
I love a lot of things about Apple Maps, but I have to admit I've regretted relying on it a few times for directions. It's terrible with abbreviations like "nyc" and it frequently fails to locate common businesses.
post #25 of 218
Of course, Android users know how to change the Map ID string from Google. /s
post #26 of 218
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by muppetry View Post

I'm not surprised by this result in the US market, but it would be interesting to know how it looks elsewhere. I am curious exactly how these data were derived though, and what the estimated error might be.

Probably more to do with Apple Maps being the default. Besides "geek customizers" I doubt a high number of iPhone/iPad users change over to something replacing what their device came pre-installed with.

 

That may be so but if, as appears to be the case, Apple's maps are less accurate and comprehensive in other parts of the world, it would be interesting to know how much that affects user choice. I would expect that it does have some effect, at least with some users.  If not, and user choice is generally either the default for the device except in the case of pre-existing preference that is uncorrelated with functionality, then that itself would be interesting. Disappointing, but interesting.

post #27 of 218
I believe this status of 80% use Apple maps, because 80% of the people use iPads and iPhones
post #28 of 218
Quote:
Originally Posted by multifoiled View Post

I'll start using Apple Maps when they figure out the old Bay Bridge from Oakland to Yerba Buena hasn't been in use for quite some time now.

 

Why would you need any GPS at all, on a route you obviously know?

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post #29 of 218

I like Apple Maps, the 3D flyover images are actually informative at times. The feature of the Notifications Center having a mention of how long it will take me to get to work or home with a tap bringing up Apple Maps with alternate routes and current transit times is useful, albeit just this tad creepy...:)

post #30 of 218
Quote:
Originally Posted by muppetry View Post

That may be so but if, as appears to be the case, Apple's maps are less accurate and comprehensive in other parts of the world, it would be interesting to know how much that affects user choice. I would expect that it does have some effect, at least with some users.  If not, and user choice is generally either the default for the device except in the case of pre-existing preference that is uncorrelated with functionality, then that itself would be interesting. Disappointing, but interesting.

A couple years old now, but a 2011 study found that only 5% of desktop users bothered to change any defaults. In my personal opinion I don't think mobile users are all that different. For most the assumption would be that things came set as they are for a reason. To paraphrase the article "(Apple) must know what they're doing" so nothing should be changed. That's why iAds and location-mining are on by default.
http://www.uie.com/brainsparks/2011/09/14/do-users-change-their-settings/
Edited by Gatorguy - 11/11/13 at 11:49am
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post #31 of 218

Are they still adding 3D flyover to more US cities? I haven't heard much about that lately (last city I think was Paris). When it rolled out I figured they would have maybe 100 or so US cities by now.

post #32 of 218
Quote:
Originally Posted by hill60 View Post
 

 

Why would you need any GPS at all, on a route you obviously know?

Getting audio and/or advance notice of traffic issues ahead in time to plan an alternate route has it's benefits. A lot of commuting is probably like mine: over the same route(s) but dependent on traffic for the specific choice, when something is all red I make a change…

post #33 of 218
If Sergey Brin/Google didn't screw Apple then iOS would still come with Google Maps and other Google apps. Since that is not the case Apple Maps will come into its own eventually 1smile.gif
post #34 of 218
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tjduffy View Post

I believe this status of 80% use Apple maps, because 80% of the people use iPads and iPhones

Wouldn't that be 100% then, since Apple Maps is only on iOS devices?
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post #35 of 218
I mostly use google maps, but two things irritate me enough to occasionally use iOS maps: I hate being asked to sign into a google account whenever gMaps loads (I don't have one, I'm not making one just to end the harassment) and I dont understand why they removed the ability to manually drag you route to modify it on the fly. Say I want to take such and such highway instead of the other highway, but everything else is the same. iOS maps let's you do that, gMaps used to, but they removed it with an update back in the summer. Why? I hate when designers change things just to change them.
post #36 of 218
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post


Do you think Apple would be trying to integrate their own profitable services to replace Google ones anyway no matter what Google did or didn't do? Apple has a history of creating their own baked-in features to replace popular 3rd party ones, not that there's anything surprising about that. IMO Apple would be replacing Google services anyway as they saw opportunities for more profit, just perhaps not as quickly as they recently have.

 

It's not really about profit. It's about controlling the experience, being masters of their own fate, and not relying on their biggest competitor for one of their most important apps. Now that Apple has maps in house, the possibilities of how they can extend and expand it within its own ecosystem are endless. If they stayed with Google, there would have so many political, and technical obstacles to doing what they really wanted to do and having deep integration with their own services. They had no choice.  

post #37 of 218
Quote:
Originally Posted by Slurpy View Post

It's not really about profit. It's about controlling the experience, being masters of their own fate, and not relying on their biggest competitor for one of their most important apps. Now that Apple has maps in house, the possibilities of how they can extend and expand it within its own ecosystem are endless. If they stayed with Google, there would have so many political, and technical obstacles to doing what they really wanted to do and having deep integration with their own services. They had no choice.  

That's the way I see it too. Google was going to be dumped at some point no matter how much they cow-towed to Apple.
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post #38 of 218
Originally Posted by Conrail View Post

Oh, goody.  An Apple car. It's an all new product, so you can't expect it to have everything.  Door handles on the inside will be added within the first six months.

 


Pathetic. Are you incapable of creative thought? Don’t think outside the box, think outside the tesseract.

 

Why would an Apple Car need door handles? Proximity to your iDevice and it would open the door for you.

 

 

 

post #39 of 218
N/M
post #40 of 218
In my area at least, Apple's maps have been significantly more accurate than Google from day one. It doesn't even cross my mind to use Google anymore.
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