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Apple Maps took around 80 percent of Google Maps' iOS traffic in one year - Page 2

post #41 of 218
Quote:
Originally Posted by jfc1138 View Post
 

Getting audio and/or advance notice of traffic issues ahead in time to plan an alternate route has it's benefits. A lot of commuting is probably like mine: over the same route(s) but dependent on traffic for the specific choice, when something is all red I make a change…

 

So you learn nothing from previously taken routes and will blindly drive according to the prompts from a GPS, even when you know it is wrong?

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post #42 of 218
Quote:
Originally Posted by multifoiled View Post

I'll start using Apple Maps when they figure out the old Bay Bridge from Oakland to Yerba Buena hasn't been in use for quite some time now.

Didn't that re-open in September?

 

ETA: Amusing, zoom in on Googelmaps and the spans completed roadway disappears...


Edited by jfc1138 - 11/11/13 at 12:45pm
post #43 of 218
Quote:
Originally Posted by lowededwookie View Post
 

We did a silly search yesterday and found something interesting.

 

Living in New Plymouth, New Zealand we looked up how long it would take us to walk from New Plymouth to the gas works in Kapuni. Google Maps said 13 hours something but took us down the main road to get there.

 

However, Apple Maps cut us through Mount Egmont National Park and dropped 15 minutes. Apple Maps wins because A) it's a straight line, B) it's a far more beautiful walk.

 

I thought they renamed Mt Egmont to Mt Taranaki. I haven't lived in NZ in 20 years though. Did the name not stick?

post #44 of 218
Quote:
Originally Posted by hill60 View Post
 

 

So you learn nothing from previously taken routes and will blindly drive according to the prompts from a GPS, even when you know it is wrong?

Huh? I get traffic information from the gps mapper and integrate that information into my route choices.

 

The route construction feature simply lays out the route choices for on the go notifications once I've selected the one I'll be using (there's three initially, all with about the same travel times but some more scenic than the others, which is less important at night on my way home), which, being audible, are far safer than looking at the display while on the go, yet for longer commutes where road status can change while on the way, the updated information can be quite useful. I, for instance, have a couple of bailout points were the route ahead to get clogged while I'm heading that way and with ongoing construction that can happen even at off hours and accidents, of course, are not predictable simply on past experience over a route.


Edited by jfc1138 - 11/11/13 at 12:08pm
post #45 of 218

Fundamentally, Google can never be a good strategic partner to anyone. Their business model is in the collection and monetization of users' data. The only organizations that would benefit from being part of that model are ones who also are focused on the collection and monetization of users' data. And that would create an inherent long term conflict with Google.

 

Apple's business model is clear. They sell you things. They don't sell you.

post #46 of 218
Quote:
Originally Posted by focher View Post
 

Fundamentally, Google can never be a good strategic partner to anyone. Their business model is in the collection and monetization of users' data. The only organizations that would benefit from being part of that model are ones who also are focused on the collection and monetization of users' data. And that would create an inherent long term conflict with Google.

 

Apple's business model is clear. They sell you things. They don't sell you.

 

Is that necessarily true? A company that has no focus on collecting user data might make a fine partner for Google, if they benefit instead from the Google service being offered. Provided, of course, that they don't mind their customers data being mined. In Apple's case it is more likely to be business overlap that broke the relationship.

post #47 of 218
Interestingly, few of the pundits (excluding DED), noted all of the problems with Google Maps. That stupid application sent me on many wild goose chases, including one where I ended up in front of a private residence about half a mile from the address of a store I was looking for. Another time it took me to a store that had been closed for a year.

NO application is perfect. That's why there are updates and new versions. Apple's Maps, IMO, started out at least as good as Google Maps and only got better while Google Maps started listing paid advertising.
post #48 of 218
Quote:
Originally Posted by focher View Post

Fundamentally, Google can never be a good strategic partner to anyone. Their business model is in the collection and monetization of users' data. The only organizations that would benefit from being part of that model are ones who also are focused on the collection and monetization of users' data. And that would create an inherent long term conflict with Google.

Apple's business model is clear. They sell you things. They don't sell you.

Over the past couple of years Apple has been ramping up the monetization of it's users, sometimes referred to as "selling you". They're in the game, particularly on iOS devices, just not yet to the level of Google. In their latest disclosure Apple tells you right up front that they may use your personally identifiable information for advertising purposes if you agree to use Apple products. Most users probably don't bother reading Apple's Privacy Policy and overlook the mention even if they do.

To Apple's credit they make it clear they won't share personally identifiable information with outside parties except in very specific instances. Of course Google's Privacy Policy says the same thing. They don't share it either.
Edited by Gatorguy - 11/11/13 at 12:37pm
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post #49 of 218

These stats make me happy.

post #50 of 218
When is Apple going to deal with overlapping markers on their maps? If you have a strip mall, all the stores are indicated at the same position, so you only actually see a single random store. This is my biggest remaining disappointment with AppleMaps.
post #51 of 218
Quote:
Originally Posted by Slurpy View Post
 

 

What an insightful post. I look forward to such future drivel from you. 

 

In all honesty, what new product has "everything"? Please point me to this mythical product that pulls every single possible feature from the future, so that no new version ever needs to be made, and it remains future-proof forever. 

 

Re the topic, good. Apple maps has improved significantly, and will obviously keep getting better and adding more features. I expect public transmit to be added  in 2014. 

 

The guy would probably drive a Homer Car ;) 

http://simpsons.wikia.com/wiki/The_Homer

 

A product of too many useless features.


Edited by monstrosity - 11/11/13 at 12:26pm
post #52 of 218
Quote:
Originally Posted by focher View Post
Apple's business model is clear. They sell you things. They don't sell you.

 

Out of curiosity, what would you think of a company that sold you things AND sold you?

post #53 of 218
Quote:
Originally Posted by Conrail View Post
 

Oh, goody.  An Apple car.

 

It's an all new product, so you can't expect it to have everything.  Door handles on the inside will be added within the first six months.

 

Yeah, because Google products are not in beta for years and years.  And none of them ever gets discontinued at what seems to be a whim.

post #54 of 218
Quote:
Originally Posted by GadgetCanadaV2 View Post
 

Queue all the "Apple maps made me get lost" idiots

This make me remember an old news many years ago, someone sued its RV mfg because he had an accident when he wrongly taught he could leave the wheel to take a nap at the back while his RV can drive its self on the cruise control.

post #55 of 218
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pooch View Post


i agree. i drove from san francisco to the east bay just yesterday and, thanks to apple maps, i ended up on the *old* span. i mean, really, c'mon apple.

First of all, Google Maps is not without mistakes .. do a "google" search to see them ... secondly, G/maps is a more mature version, started in 2005, I believe, so in effect .... google is in it's "maturity" phase while Apple's map version is still quite (1 year)  young.

 

Think of it this way ... when Apple maps reaches "maturity" .... Google maps will be reaching "senility". 

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post #56 of 218
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mystigo View Post
 

 

I thought they renamed Mt Egmont to Mt Taranaki. I haven't lived in NZ in 20 years though. Did the name not stick?


I grew up calling it Mt Egmont. In reality it was renamed Mt Egmont from Mt Taranaki then the PC Thugs got in on the act and decided that since the British stole the land off the Maori we should change it back to Mt Taranaki.

 

In my not so humble opinion and due to the fact I despise the PC Thugs I still call it Mt Egmont mostly because it has less syllables and I hate expending energy when I don't have to. :-)

post #57 of 218
Quote:
Originally Posted by sog35 View Post
 

wow.  Google should really learn how to play nice.  If they remained happy with offering internet services they would do very well.  A Google services + Apple hardware + iOS is a dream machine.

 

But Google got greedy and stabbed Apple in the back with Android.  Then they buy Motorola to build phones.  Now Apple will begin taking away Google services from iOS devices one app at a time.  Its only a matter of time that Apple switches out Google search.  Bottom line is Google dipping into hardware/mobile OS platforms have not netted them any money.  In fact they are losing over a billion dollars a year on Motorola and probably tens of millions from all the iOS users leaving Google Maps.  Once Apple finds a suitable replacement for Google search or strenthens Siri's usability they will be toast. 

 

Instead of worring about hardware/OS Google should have concentrated on search/ads.  Now we have Facebook and Twitter coming into play.  iRadio.  Ect.  All these will be begin pealing away search dollars.


Gmail will be the next best candidate for Apple to take away.

post #58 of 218
Quote:
Originally Posted by aaarrrgggh View Post

When is Apple going to deal with overlapping markers on their maps? If you have a strip mall, all the stores are indicated at the same position, so you only actually see a single random store. This is my biggest remaining disappointment with AppleMaps.


Isn't a strip mall technically a single address anyway? I mean on council plans they'd be for example 101-121 Mall Street or whatever not showing up as separate addresses but as part of properties. Unless the carpark of the mall is actually a street the shops in that mall will not be classed as separate addresses.

 

Google Maps will also use addresses unless someone actually manually enters the addresses themselves. Points of interest are generally user generated not generated through mapping services.

 

Anyway, not all the issues are Apple's problem because the mapping data is from TomTom which here in New Zealand is actually reasonably accurate.

post #59 of 218

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=yerba+buena+island&hl=en&ll=37.817027,-122.3567&spn=0.00513,0.0056&sll=40.002498,-75.118033&sspn=0.450241,0.716858&t=h&hnear=Yerba+Buena+Island&z=18

 

Watch that first step! A huge section of the newly opened bridge disappears as you zoom in. oops.


Edited by jfc1138 - 11/11/13 at 12:59pm
post #60 of 218
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pooch View Post


i agree. i drove from san francisco to the east bay just yesterday and, thanks to apple maps, i ended up on the *old* span. i mean, really, c'mon apple.

I feel sorry for you if you live in the Bay area and do not know how to get across the bay yet.

 

Really people, unless you are in a totally new place why do you need navigation except to find the final destination. I never follow any GPS right out of the gate, I take path most convenient or familiar. This is why GPS have a feature which is to recalculate the path base on the direction you are taking.

 

I hate to say this, but I have been using WAZE, and I hate that google bought them since they are beginning to ruin it, but it is better than apple or google maps. It even has a feature which remember the paths you use the most often and take real time traffic into consideration. This would not have taken you over the old span, but if like following mindless what can people do.

post #61 of 218
Quote:
Originally Posted by muppetry View Post
 

 

Is that necessarily true? A company that has no focus on collecting user data might make a fine partner for Google, if they benefit instead from the Google service being offered. Provided, of course, that they don't mind their customers data being mined. In Apple's case it is more likely to be business overlap that broke the relationship.

 

I think it is true, because even in your example it's only a matter of time before Google introduces a competing service so that it doesn't have to share the monetization of that user data with the "partner". I struggle to find an example of any company that used Google services that reached a measurable size and didn't have Google try to crowd into its turf. Remember that Google's services only exist to drive traffic to Google's search and ad business, which are the only two real revenue streams they've managed to created.

post #62 of 218
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

Over the past couple of years Apple has been ramping up the monetization of it's users, sometimes referred to as "selling you". They're in the game, particularly on iOS devices, just not yet to the level of Google. In their latest disclosure Apple tells you right up front that they may use your personally identifiable information for advertising purposes if you agree to use Apple products. Most users probably don't bother reading Apple's Privacy Policy and overlook the mention even if they do.

To Apple's credit they make it clear they won't share personally identifiable information with outside parties except in very specific instances. Of course Google's Privacy Policy says the same thing. They don't share it either.

 

The only one I'm aware of is iAds, and it's a (somewhat) clear opt-out for users. Are there other examples? It's definitely not a significant revenue stream for them, especially when compared to Google where it's pretty much the only revenue stream.

post #63 of 218
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

Probably more to do with Apple Maps being the default. Besides "geek customizers" I doubt a high number of iPhone/iPad users change over to something replacing what their device came pre-installed with.

I'd agree being the default on the most popular and successful high end, well the only one in its class really, smart phone is bound to change the numbers dramatically.
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post #64 of 218
Quote:
Originally Posted by DroidFTW View Post
 

Out of curiosity, what would you think of a company that sold you things AND sold you?

 

I live in reality. That describes all companies. However, the ones with no other revenue model other than selling my personal information are not very interesting to me.

post #65 of 218

I used Apple Maps probably twice in the last year, both times I found the features sparse. So after this article I fired it up, looks really nice on the iPad Air but is still missing public transportation like bus lines and trains. A feature I use quite a bit when traveling. You just click on the little bus icon and it gives the times or you can search. Now that I have a Nokia 1020, Nokia Maps is defiantly the better of the three, transit, traffic, good restaurants connected to Yelp, best turn by turn NAV I have ever seen yet on a map program, places of interest around you, the app is also connected to your photo library so you can see where all of your photos were taken, you can add favorite places marked by thumb pins and shows your photos if you have any. Which is cool if you want a friend to take a certain route and see some of the sites, your friend will be able to see your photos as well and he can even add his own? I know there are apps for 360 moveable photos but the Nokia comes with a app and it is fantastic for this purpose. The list of features goes on but the question is, is Apple Maps just limited because I live in Switzerland. What do you guys see in America?

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post #66 of 218
Quote:
Originally Posted by focher View Post

The only one I'm aware of is iAds, and it's a (somewhat) clear opt-out for users. Are there other examples? It's definitely not a significant revenue stream for them, especially when compared to Google where it's pretty much the only revenue stream.

You can opt-out of receiving targeted ads tho it's hardly made obvious and Apple's default is targeted ads anyway which most users won't ever change "just because". How do you opt-out of user data collection in the first place, or opt-out of Apple using it for whatever purpose they deem important as long as it's not shared outside of Apple in a personally identifiable form? For that matter how do you find out what Apple has stored about you?

As far as I can tell both Apple and Google treat personal and non-personal information in the same way, tho Google is more transparent about it. Do you have something that shows otherwise?
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post #67 of 218
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

That's the way I see it too. Google was going to be dumped at some point no matter how much they cow-towed to Apple.

Kow-towed?

Like saying. Oh sorry, we forgot to give your iOS users turn-by-turn, and Of course, sorry, we won't track your users anymore and compile their search histories so we can sell them out to our advertisers. That kind of kow-towing?
post #68 of 218
Quote:
Originally Posted by focher View Post
 

 

I live in reality. That describes all companies. However, the ones with no other revenue model other than selling my personal information are not very interesting to me.

 

At first you said Apple doesn't sell personal info, but I'm glad to see you came around to admit that they do.  It's a common misnomer around these parts that they don't.

post #69 of 218
I'm wondering if this vindicates Scott Forestall & his refusal to sign the letter that ultimately led to his ousting?

I rarely use maps but not once have I used Google Maps since the switch was made in iOS. Apple's mapping solution works great for me.
post #70 of 218
Quote:
Originally Posted by Flaneur View Post

Kow-towed?

Like saying. Oh sorry, we forgot to give your iOS users turn-by-turn, and Of course, sorry, we won't track your users anymore and compile their search histories so we can sell them out to our advertisers. That kind of kow-towing?

No, like "sorry Mr Jobs, we'll dump Android altogether and do whatever you want". Would that have really changed Apple's policy of controlling their platform as tightly as possible and everything on it? If not then Google was going to be slowly pushed out anyway no matter what they did as they would be just another variable that Apple couldn't totally control. The only thing that's happened is perhaps Google's moves sped up the process. But it was still going to happen.

There are few long term partners of Apple and IMHO the ones that stick around for awhile are there are only because Apple hasn't yet found a profitable/practical way to replace them with something brewed in-house. There's nothing wrong with that either.
Edited by Gatorguy - 11/11/13 at 1:27pm
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post #71 of 218
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

No, like "sorry Mr Jobs, we'll dump Android altogether and do whatever you want". Would that have really changed Apple's policy of controlling their platform as tightly as possible and everything on it? If not then Google was going to be slowly pushed out anyway no matter what they did as they would be just another variable that Apple couldn't totally control. The only thing that's happened is perhaps Google's moves sped up the process. But it was still going to happen.

There are few long term partners of Apple and IMHO the ones that stick around for awhile are there are only because Apple hasn't yet found a profitable/practical way to replace them with something brewed in-house. There's nothing wrong with that either.

Hey Gatorguy,

Based on your previous history of liking to provide references, links, and various other sources of information I was wondering, in the interest of 'bringing the truth' if you could be so kind to assist?

I'd like at least five links referencing Google's treatment of Apple users in the past (when they were attempting to monetize their own platform) by dragging their heels, rationing updates, and withholding features that they had no issues providing to users of the Android operating system.

Then go find a few philosophy quotes on the importance of 'not pissing in your own pool' when it comes to one of your biggest customers.

Thanks in advance.
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post #72 of 218
Quote:
Originally Posted by GTR View Post

Hey Gatorguy,

Based on your previous history of liking to provide references, links, and various other sources of information I was wondering, in the interest of 'bringing the truth' if you could be so kind to assist?

I'd like at least five links referencing Google's treatment of Apple users in the past (when they were attempting to monetize their own platform) by dragging their heels, rationing updates, and withholding features that they had no issues providing to users of the Android operating system.

Then go find a few philosophy quotes on the importance of 'not pissing in your own pool' when it comes to one of your biggest customers.

Thanks in advance.

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I'm not aware of any reliable sources supporting assertions that Google chose to "drag it's heels" or "ration updates" to Apple users, tho it's not hard to find opinions on either side. If ya got some links proving who dunnit feel free to share 'em tho.

Philosophy seems more your style than mine tho I've heard there's quotes for every occasion. So whatever your viewpoint there's probably something out there that serves your purpose. If not your're a witty guy so I'm sure you can come up with something that's good for a funny distraction if nothing else.1smile.gif
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post #73 of 218
Quote:
Originally Posted by Slurpy View Post
 

 

It's not really about profit. It's about controlling the experience, being masters of their own fate, and not relying on their biggest competitor for one of their most important apps. Now that Apple has maps in house, the possibilities of how they can extend and expand it within its own ecosystem are endless. If they stayed with Google, there would have so many political, and technical obstacles to doing what they really wanted to do and having deep integration with their own services. They had no choice.  

Exactly.  Apple learned from Microsoft in the 80s.

 

Office on Macs became more and more a second tier product relative to the PC versions until Macs just wasn't a viable option for people using Office heavily.

 

Apple just had enough of Google Maps getting better on Android while lagging on iOS.

post #74 of 218
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

I'm not aware of any reliable sources supporting assertions...

 

You generally aren’t, when they don’t support your view, despite them being widely available.

 

Would you like the link for our ability to remember?

 

;)

Apple managed the astonishing feat of getting the equivalent of a personal computer into the hands of everybody from eight to eighty year olds, and did so while providing absolutely no instructions...
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Apple managed the astonishing feat of getting the equivalent of a personal computer into the hands of everybody from eight to eighty year olds, and did so while providing absolutely no instructions...
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post #75 of 218

I can't use Apple Maps where I live. The sattellite images are just bad

post #76 of 218
Originally Posted by okvalle View Post
I can't use Apple Maps where I live. The sattellite images are just bad

 

And the vector mapping, which is what really matters? How’s that?

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Originally Posted by Marvin

The only thing more insecure than Android’s OS is its userbase.
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post #77 of 218
Quote:
Originally Posted by bsenka View Post

In my area at least, Apple's maps have been significantly more accurate than Google from day one. It doesn't even cross my mind to use Google anymore.

What accuracy are you referring to, just popping up an address on a map or actually getting there?  Far more often, Apple's maps sends me in circles with less efficient routes compared to Google Maps.

post #78 of 218
Quote:
Originally Posted by sog35 View Post
 

Its only a matter of time that Apple switches out Google search.  

 

It's only a matter of time before Apple offers their own search engine. 

post #79 of 218
Quote:
Originally Posted by GTR View Post

You generally aren’t, when they don’t support your view, despite them being widely available.

Would you like the link...?

1wink.gif

Yes I'd love your link proving Google chose to "drag their heels".

I'd also love your proof that I don't provide links on request for everything I treat as factual and not opinion. You should try it for yourself too by the way. You'll likely be amazed (or maybe not) when you go looking for evidence to support the things you thought were true but probably aren't in hindsight.
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post #80 of 218
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

Yes I'd love your link proving Google chose to "drag their heels".

I'd also love your proof that I don't provide links on request for everything I treat as factual and not opinion. 

 

Why provide links?

 

You think I’m silly enough to believe that you’re capable of not being ‘Googleguy”?

Apple managed the astonishing feat of getting the equivalent of a personal computer into the hands of everybody from eight to eighty year olds, and did so while providing absolutely no instructions...
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Apple managed the astonishing feat of getting the equivalent of a personal computer into the hands of everybody from eight to eighty year olds, and did so while providing absolutely no instructions...
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