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Apple brings customizable toolbars back to iWork suite for Mac, updates iOS app versions - Page 2

post #41 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post
The trouble with too many folks is they want to wait till all is ok but miss out on their own learning experiences by not being willing to use early versions.

Sometimes it's a thin line that divides 'learning experiences' from 'time-wasting projects'. 

post #42 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post


That was a fun time wasn't it? I remember running the initial free OS X beta and it was instant love for me but I recall there was a huge outcry from many. Some folks have to be dragged kicking and screaming for sure...

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by dysamoria View Post


Well, it was a disaster. OS X then wasn't remotely what OS X is today. It took till 10.4 to start feeling like a real OS and till 10.6 to really shine.

As for these iWork updates... I'm not upgrading until it's an actual upgrade.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by jungmark View Post


You may be misremembering. It wasn't a disaste, it was a rebirth of the Mac as we knew it. It paved the way for the future.


IMO, while an impressive piece of engineering, 10.0 was essentially a late alpha version dressed in beta clothes and delivered in retail packaging - released by a company still in danger of irrelevancy and betting the company on a new computing metaphor.

 

So I understand why, and it all worked out as a big success story - but no way it would have been released without more work if Apple had been a healthy company already cruising along with good growth and profits rather than an endangered (if iconic) tech species.

 

10.1 and 2 were decent beta +'s, 10.3 roughly the real 10.0 (and slooow). 10.4 was the first version that was fully usable with most of the kinks worked out and superb at what it did. 

 

Which I can confirm because I'm still using it on my 2004 iBook - still my bookkeeping and portable word processing machine... ...i.e., Tiger still rocks!


Edited by bigpics - 11/22/13 at 4:14pm

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post #43 of 50

So, um, anyone else had issues with the iOS updates of iWork?
 

I found an empty folder in iCloud that I deleted and that might be what solved my problems... Hope this helps someone!

post #44 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rich Gregory View Post
 

So, um, anyone else had issues with the iOS updates of iWork?
 

I found an empty folder in iCloud that I deleted and that might be what solved my problems... Hope this helps someone!

 

Explain in greater detail what your problem was and what you did to "fix" that problem.

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post #45 of 50

The new Numbers app crashed on start when using iCloud. Somehow an empty folder was on my iCloud account with the name 'Old Monthly 2012' which is odd, I had a folder called 'Mothly 2012.' 

 

After deleting the empty folder from my iMac Numbers started working on all my iOS devices. I don't know if that is what solved the problem, but others seem to think it helped them as well.

 

Also, one of my locked files is no longer locked! 

 

Weird. 

post #46 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Darryn Lowe View Post
 

They've already done it better than everyone else. I mean seriously, how long did Windows 8.1 take to come out? How long did Windows 7 take to come out to fix Vista?

 

Those examples support the notion that MS actually provides the smoother migration path. MS continued to sell and support WinXP until they fixed up Vista's problems in Win 7. Similarly Windows 7 licenses are still available for purchase for those who don't like Windows 8. One can't say the same about the previous version of iWork. The only way to get a copy if you don't already have it seems to be to find someone who happens to have one and sideload it. 


Edited by d4NjvRzf - 11/23/13 at 7:00am
post #47 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rich Gregory View Post

The new Numbers app crashed on start when using iCloud. Somehow an empty folder was on my iCloud account with the name 'Old Monthly 2012' which is odd, I had a folder called 'Mothly 2012.' 

After deleting the empty folder from my iMac Numbers started working on all my iOS devices. I don't know if that is what solved the problem, but others seem to think it helped them as well.

Also, one of my locked files is no longer locked! 

Weird. 

That is odd.

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

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Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

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post #48 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

Sometimes it's a thin line that divides 'learning experiences' from 'time-wasting projects'. 


I must say, this is the best line in this thread. And like you, I love letting others "beta test" stuff for me. When I was (much) younger I felt the pull to be on the bleeding edge, but so often it's just a huge time suck, and I don't really have interest spending time debugging early-release problems when I could instead be spending with my family or building something cool.

So here's my question for you folks who are using the new release:

Background: I don't use ANY "cloud" ANYTHING. I don't and won't allow my word processor or spreadsheet or presentation software to connect to the fucking internet whatsoever. (aside: I can kind of understand letting your apps auto-connect to the mother ship to check for updates, but frankly, I can't fathom how anyone would EVER store their actual personal or work-related documents on servers that you don't control, where you may not be able to access them without an internet connection, etc.)

To the question: is there anything whatsoever that would benefit me in the new iWork release where I should even bother to download and take a look at it? There are unquestionably some lost features, so that is a serious downside, but if cloud crap is not part of the usage scenario at all (and a slight negative, in fact, because the mere inclusion of features you won't use at all usually means wasted UI you need to ignore or deal with in some way), is there any benefit to the new release?.

Disregarding the dumb asses who will undoubtedly respond with "embrace the cloud!"-type comments, does anyone have any helpful feedback that addresses the actual question here?
Edited by Blah64 - 11/23/13 at 12:00pm
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post #49 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blah64 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

Sometimes it's a thin line that divides 'learning experiences' from 'time-wasting projects'. 


I must say, this is the best line in this thread. And like you, I love letting others "beta test" stuff for me. When I was (much) younger I felt the pull to be on the bleeding edge, but so often it's just a huge time suck, and I don't really have interest spending time debugging early-release problems when I could instead be spending with my family or building something cool.

So here's my question for you folks who are using the new release:

Background: I don't use ANY "cloud" ANYTHING. I don't and won't allow my word processor or spreadsheet or presentation software to connect to the fucking internet whatsoever. (aside: I can kind of understand letting your apps auto-connect to the mother ship to check for updates, but frankly, I can't fathom how anyone would EVER store their actual personal or work-related documents on servers that you don't control, where you may not be able to access them without an internet connection, etc.)

To the question: is there anything whatsoever that would benefit me in the new iWork release where I should even bother to download and take a look at it? There are unquestionably some lost features, so that is a serious downside, but if cloud crap is not part of the usage scenario at all (and a slight negative, in fact, because the mere inclusion of features you won't use at all usually means wasted UI you need to ignore or deal with in some way), is there any benefit to the new release?.

Disregarding the dumb asses who will undoubtedly respond with "embrace the cloud!"-type comments, does anyone have any helpful feedback that address the actual question here?

My reaction to 6.0 was, primarily, "four frickin' years to work on it and this is all Apple's iWork group could come up with!?"

Consider all the hardware innovations -- starting with the iPad -- during this time!

They should all be fired for not just their mediocrity, but their utter lack of embarrassment.
post #50 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

My reaction to 6.0 was, primarily, "four frickin' years to work on it and this is all Apple's iWork group could come up with!?"

Consider all the hardware innovations -- starting with the iPad -- during this time!

They should all be fired for not just their mediocrity, but their utter lack of embarrassment.

 

I'm similarly frustrated, though I think I have a different take on it.

 

Those of us that have been with Apple for many, many years, as I think you have, we've seen Apple blow things up and start fresh many times.  We don't need to look any further than OS X for that!  Usually things come out better, eventually, but there's a period of time where there's pain.  I think the people here who are complete fanboys (and many would put me in that category) are ignoring that period of pain.  "who cares about lost features, the world only revolves around me, blah blah blah".  But it really is frustrating.  Fortunately, this time Apple left the previous version untouched, but they are not always so benevolent with other updates, like iOS system software.  Good luck down-revving that!

 

On the other hand, blowing up and starting fresh allows real advancements, and frankly, as mundane as it sounds, a new code base.  It's quite possible that the old code base for iWork was not in great shape and making it difficult to add new, innovative features (or lets be honest, even basic stuff that has been missing for the past few years).  This is speculation, of course, but it would not be surprising at all.

 

What I wish Apple would do is to simply release the new product with a different name (or partial new name), and leave the previous version alone until they are on relatively equal footing, feature-wise.  Continue to sell (or make available) both, for a while.  This would align expectations.  For example, this could have been iWork Online Version.  Maybe that's too long, but you get the idea.  Maybe iWork Cloud.  Perhaps Apple (channeling Jobs) is still just too stubborn to do that, prioritizing simplicity of product lines over functionality, but that's what I wish they would do, as it could satisfy almost everyone without pissing so many people off every time, due to unaligned expectations.  OS X actually did this, by way of its compatibility layer, without destroying the new product.  It was a lot of work, I'm sure, but it made the transition possible.  Without it, I don't think we would be having these conversations because Apple probably wouldn't have survived into this decade.

 

Oh, and I'm still hoping someone can address my question above.  Or is there absolutely nothing of interest to me at all in the new iWork?


Edited by Blah64 - 11/23/13 at 3:50pm
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