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iOS-friendly Good profiled as "Blackberry-Killer" invading enterprise

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 
Good Technology is "stealthily stealing Blackberry's enterprise clients with a simple pitch" that offers companies a secure path to accommodate Bring Your Own Device policies, a movement that has ushered Apple into corporate markets.

CNBC Good


A report by Kayla Tausche for CNBC profiled Good's facilitation of BYOB, noting the company's plans to promote the idea that "Blackberry is no Good."

Major banks, including Morgan Stanley, Bank of America, Credit Suisse and JPMorgan Chase, as well as some of the largest healthcare organizations, have adopted Good's platform, enabling them to "ditch their ancient BlackBerry."

Good's chief executive Christy Wyatt has previously worked for Apple, Palm, Google and Motorola. In 2006, Motorola acquired Good for $400 million in an attempt to compete more directly with RIM and its popular BlackBerry Enterprise Server. Two years later, Motorola sold Good to a push email provider at a steep discount. Google later announced plans to purchase Motorola Mobility in late 2011.

Since then, Good has developed its business around supporting and securing mobile devices from Windows to Android and iOS. The company's quarterly metrics indicate that its clients are not interested in Windows Phone and that adoption of Android is slipping, while Apple's iOS now accounts for 72 percent of all mobile device activations in Q3.

Good Q3 2013


Good also reported that iOS accounts for the majority of mobile phones and that iPads make up 90 percent of mobile tablets used in the enterprise by the firm's clients.

The company also noted, "iOS dominates as platform of choice for enterprise app deployment, with 98 percent and 95 percent of total app activations in Q2 and Q3 respectively."



Good is in the headlines now as the company eyes making an Initial Public Offering, and as BlackBerry continues its decline.

"We've actually grown our active users by 50 percent within the last three quarters," Wyatt stated.
post #2 of 22
Somebody tell the White House. Honestly, it's embarrassing to see our president still stuck in the technology of yesteryear. A non-U.S. one at that. What kind of message does that send to the world?
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post #3 of 22

Can anyone figure out what their product actually is? This article doesn't say anything, the source doesn't say anything, the Wikipedia page looks like it was written by the company and doesn't say anything either...

 

edit: Moments after posting this I managed to find details at http://www1.good.com/good-dynamics-platform/. It's a combination of remote management tools, app "containerization" (as far as I can see this is essentially sandboxing), an enterprise app store and some analytic / management tools.

post #4 of 22

@darklite Yes, you need to read some more about Good Technology. This company has been in the news for several years so you must be new to mobile device management (MDM). Good does more than just sandboxing, it creates a separate encrypted data environment for managed users. This makes BYOD possible for corporate and government installations. The user can only connect to corporate resources through the Good client and if the user leaves the job, it's easy to purge the corporate data without messing up the phone.

 

@Robin As for the US government, Blackberry devices are there because they were the first and only mobile device with a complete end-to-end encrypted capability. They might still be required by legal firms and medical agencies because of government regulations although this is changing. iOS 6&7 have been certified by NIST for FIPS 140-2, which is required for government agencies but this is relatively new. Of course, US government agencies still love Windows garbage and hate anything related to Apple so it will take time to get rid of the old technology before Apple devices can move in.

post #5 of 22
At my work me have just ditched Blackberry and replaced with Good. It allows the normal Blackberry type function of having access to your Office based MS Outlook emails, appointments and contacts. So far I have been happy with the look on the screen, apart from too much red colouring. Our IT people said they dropped Blackberry due to the increased costs of licensing and lack of security. With Good I have to log in with a password every time I use it which was never required with my Office Blackberry.
post #6 of 22
This is another area where RIM not only missed the boat but failed to see the droves of people queued up to get on. They already had infrastructure in place with the many Blackberry Enterprise Servers installed at company sites around the world. They were so intent on protecting their brand they did not dare to admit other devices onto their platform. Had they been more device-agnostic they could have trumped Good and even Microsoft.

As it is, the Good suite of products now admits all comers and is so, well, good it has even prompted some companies to drop Microsoft's ActiveSync in favor of Good for some purposes.
post #7 of 22

My wife had the Good app installed on her iPhone. Her law firm provides her with a Blackberry, but she could also access her email etc. with the Good app on the iPhone. However, it would consume vast amounts of data (GB's over a few days) whenever it was running, even in the background. I could not understand why, so we deleted the app (tried it twice, once when she lost her Blackberry). She was not interested in problem solving, so I never figured out why so much data was required. I don't know if it was downloading attachments, but even so her files are not that large (Word files and pdf's mostly). Even in my Blackberry days, I don't think I used 1 GB/month even though I got hundreds of emails per day, most with attachments (PDF's).

 

I am sure her firm is trying to figure out how to offload their Blackberry expenses onto their employees, so I may have to deal with Good again.

post #8 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dachar View Post

At my work me have just ditched Blackberry and replaced with Good. It allows the normal Blackberry type function of having access to your Office based MS Outlook emails, appointments and contacts. So far I have been happy with the look on the screen, apart from too much red colouring. Our IT people said they dropped Blackberry due to the increased costs of licensing and lack of security. With Good I have to log in with a password every time I use it which was never required with my Office Blackberry.

Have you noticed whether or not your data consumption has increased dramatically on your iPhone? That was my experience with the Good app (see my post elsewhere).

post #9 of 22
What's the most secure email application? Given how much trouble the big tech firms get into when their email is exposed in court, one that utterly and totally destroys every copy of that email after some period of time. Not just encryption... total oblivion. Does Good Technology offer that?

One day I found a paralegal I know with a foot-high stack of paper in front of her. It was printed emails from a firm her law firm was suing and her job was to wade through that stack looking for dirt or at least something that could be made to look like dirt.

The unfortunate consequence of that is that, over time, firms will learn to never put down doubts about the safety of a product in any tangible form. They will reserve those conversations for face to face in some isolated spot.

One comment about Obama's Blackberry. That's the least of our worries. There are issues that matter infinitely more. He and Kerry have so botched our Middle-eastern policy, that the Israelis and Saudis are reported to be meeting secretly to decide on join action against a soon-to-be nuclear Iran. It's not impossible that Israeli fighter-bombers will hit Iran's nuclear sites, operating out of Saudi airfields and with a Saudi fighter escort. When Jews and Arabs can agree that an American policy is really bad, it's really, really bad.
post #10 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Good Technology is "stealthily stealing Blackberry's enterprise clients with a simple pitch" that offers companies a secure path to accommodate Bring Your Own Device policies, a movement that has ushered Apple into corporate markets.

Major banks, including Morgan Stanley, Bank of America, Credit Suisse and JPMorgan Chase, as well as some of the largest healthcare organizations, have adopted Good's platform, enabling them to "ditch their ancient BlackBerry."

Since then, Good has developed its business around supporting and securing mobile devices from Windows to Android and iOS. The company's quarterly metrics indicate that its clients are not interested in Windows Phone and that adoption of Android is slipping, while Apple's iOS now accounts for 72 percent of all mobile device activations in Q3.

Good also reported that iOS accounts for the majority of mobile phones and that iPads make up 90 percent of mobile tablets used in the enterprise by the firm's clients.

The company also noted, "iOS dominates as platform of choice for enterprise app deployment, with 98 percent and 95 percent of total app activations in Q2 and Q3 respectively.

Sad for Blackberry, but Good for Apple.

BB recently announced they are giving up the consumer market, which they failed in, for the secured business market.

BB should look out the window, their business market has been taken from them. Not Good for BB!

post #11 of 22

Another paid advertisement published as an genuine article. One must work with BES and Good to be able to compare and there is no comparison. One service is native and one is containerized. Every week Good servers are down for maintenance

 

@Dachar - the fact that you never required to enter password to unlock your BB means that you need a better BES admin. If this is you - look for another job

 

Both BES and Good require only outbound ports, so pretty secure from this point of view.

With BES one has seamless VPN to the Intranet - no clients, special configs etc. Good has similar, but it is extra license, so whoever say Good is cheaper than BES is probably using just Good for Enterprise

 

Give credit where credit is due

post #12 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by DonPedro View Post
 

Another paid advertisement published as an genuine article.

 

This is genuine in my case. I work for one of the larger financial institutions in the nation, and we retired BES in March of this year and deployed Good and Airwatch as email solutions.

post #13 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

A report by Kayla Tausche for CNBC profiled Good's facilitation of BYOB, noting the company's plans to promote the idea that "Blackberry is no Good."

Bring Your Own Blackberry?
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"See her this weekend. You hit it off, come Turkey Day, maybe you can stuff her."
- Roger Sterling
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post #14 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Inkling View Post

What's the most secure email application? Given how much trouble the big tech firms get into when their email is exposed in court, one that utterly and totally destroys every copy of that email after some period of time. Not just encryption... total oblivion. Does Good Technology offer that?

The destruction of an email, or any computer data, is the responsibility of the email server being used. If I remember correctly, the BES server connects to the corporate Exchange server, serving encrypted emails to a Blackberry. Good does the same thing, using an Exchange server to handle the email while providing encrypted transmission between the mobile device and the server. As we all know, an Exchange server is the best in the world and never has problems saving data, in fact, give it some time and it will destroy all your emails without asking. (sarcasm) If the law firm really wants to get rid of sensitive information (don't like this practice), they need to set up their server to properly dispose of old data. This can be done and doesn't require anything from Blackberry or Good technology, it just requires a competent IT admin.

post #15 of 22

Thanks for the technical details. I left tech writing in the late 1980s, so my knowledge there is relatively rudimentary. I would add that getting rid of old emails does need some expertise. There can't be an old backup lying in some closet. There can't be an old hard drive that was pulled but still works erratically. 

 

Obliterating email doesn't really apply to what I do: write, edit and publish books. But I am concerned about the downside of all this peeking and poking into corporate internal communications. Conversations about product safety and the like need to be made. Creating too great a legal consequence may simply drive and debate into an ineffective underground. What's good for lawyers isn't necessarily what is good for the public. Sometimes, secrets are best kept.

 

Years ago, I worked at a USAF radar site in Florida. Occasionally, the Air Force would launch old ground-to-air missiles converted into cruise-missile-like drones. Fighters would play games attacking it and breaking off. Then it'd be detonated far out in the Gulf of Mexico. the military likes to play games like that.

 

Well they'd finished playing with one of those missiles and the fighter was returning home. They tried the primary destruct system. The missile continued southward as if nothing had happened. They tried the backup destruct. Again nothing. Then they tried the final destruct technique. The two radars tracking the missile were both ordered into dummy loads. With the missile's C-band beacon no longer being triggered, it was supposed to self-destruct after a minute. A little more than a minute later, the radars came back up. It was still there heading south. By that point it was too distant to intercept with a fighter. The southmost radar in the range tracked it to near Cuba with enough fuel to overfly the country.

 

Unfortunately, according to the guys I worked with, when the first destruct failed, someone quipped over the internal intercom that the missile was 'headed to Cuba." There's no way an often hysterical press could take that as an innocent comment. Carefully, someone at the site found that comment on a seven-track tape and erased just it. A ridiculous media firestorm was averted.

 

At the time I was working there, the USAF had taken precautions to make sure that never happened again. Instead of heading the missiles southward and beginning the air games, they flew them to the south end of the range and launched the attacks on northbound missiles. That way, if the destruct schemes failed, the missile would be headed toward air interceptors in the U.S. rather than away. They also limited the on-board fuel supply, so it couldn't go as far. 

post #16 of 22

What a content-free article. Dilger might as well have written "'Good' — go and research it yourself" and left it at that.

post #17 of 22
This is paid for by Good puff piece. Surprising how few of you recognize the obvious signs, not the least of which is the outright lies and misinformation. Secondly the loaded language like "ancient" blackberries. Also a quick scan of the net shows how this article has been re-licensed for sharing on several blogs etc.
lastly, Blackberry's MDM solution allows for management of iOS and Android -so the claims that this was what prompted the move away from Blackberry is nonsense. Also, anyone who suggests there is a comparison between Good and BBRY in terms of service and security is also full of crap.
post #18 of 22

Blackberry has image problem. Their solution is much better than god or any other BYOD platform. Granted they have some issues but which first generation software does not; as the product matures things get better

post #19 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pchar View Post

Blackberry has image problem. Their solution is much better than god or any other BYOD platform. Granted they have some issues but which first generation software does not; as the product matures things get better

I'm surprised that they don't have a more religious following in that case.
post #20 of 22

As a company they took some missteps and they are paying for it dearly. For work purpose blackberry platform is still better but the market has shifted to having the device which can do more than work like playing games or being more social. 

 

The blackberry 10 platform is able to deliver better experience but no one wants to try the platform as the public perception is apple and android platform are better they have their shortcomings. 

 

The only thing matters what some one with authority likes not what is better solution.

post #21 of 22
RIM should have virtualized their solution into a mobile app while still promoting BB Enterprise as a management solution. The solution is still ahead of GOODs. Until GOOD tech comes out with a reliable paging service to go along with the current mail/cal solution then I will buy their stock.
post #22 of 22
While I share and agree with Daniel Eran Dilger that BB is having its challenges and future is unknown - not Good nor other MDM or container players can claim to be a BB killer. Last I checked, BB is around an $11b organization, with Good and other MDM's no where near there revenue, sales or cash position wise. Good is also just a container and BB fames on the user experience, which is always by definition lost on a sandbox - but that is for another novel.

Now go sell your product on its own merits!

For those who haven't read it: http://business.financialpost.com/2013/12/02/blackberry-ltd-john-chen-open-letter-monday/?__lsa=02a0-e38e
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