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FileMaker 13 launches with browser-based support via HTML5, new tools for iPhone & iPad

post #1 of 47
Thread Starter 
FileMaker, Inc., on Tuesday launched the next major update to its database software, with the new FileMaker 13 packing in more than 50 new features, including WebDirect, an entirely new browser-based technology for easier access.

FileMaker


FileMaker 13 is promised to make it faster and easier than ever for teams to create tailored business solutions across platforms, including iPad, iPhone, Windows, Mac, and now the Web. Available immediately, FileMaker 13 is priced at $329, while updates are available for $179. Monthly prices start at $9 for FileMaker Pro, $15 for FileMaker Pro Advanced, and $29 for FileMaker Server.

"With FileMaker 13, any team can quickly create custom solutions that streamline their business processes while minimizing design time," said Ryan Rosenberg, vice president of marketing and services for FileMaker, Inc. "The FileMaker 13 Platform gives organizations even more options for delivering powerful but easy-to-use solutions, including breakthrough web technology, along with impressive new design tools for iOS and desktops."

FileMaker


Features of the new software, according to FileMaker, include:
  • FileMaker WebDirect, an entirely new, HTML5 browser-based technology that allows teams to create and deploy desktop-style solutions in a web browser with no programming skills required.
  • Tools to create amazing iPad and iPhone solutions that support even more iOS behaviors, including slide controls, popovers and the ability to scan records using gestures. iPad and iPhone layouts can now be created in one step; and iOS solutions can include single-click capture of bar codes using on-device cameras and custom keyboards that speed data entry.
  • Major improvements to design capabilities, including support for shareable custom themes and styles, and the ability to drag and drop data fields onto design layouts.
  • More robust security, with AES 256-bit encryption that locks down data no matter where it lives - on iPad, iPhone, desktop or server. FileMaker Pro 13 Advanced is used to enable encryption.
  • Dozens of new enhancements for solution developers, from the ability to hide or display objects on a screen based on business logic to easier integration with web applications.
  • Simplified server administration, including an entirely new HTML5 administrative console in FileMaker Server 13 for managing business solutions from anywhere.


FileMaker


The official FileMaker Go app for iPhone and iPad is available for free on the iOS App Store. Server concurrent connections for FileMaker Go or FileMaker WebDirect cost $25 per 5-pack, per month, and are available from FileMaker and software resellers.
post #2 of 47

Wish Apple would just fold them into themselves.

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post #3 of 47
But they still can't figure out how to open one of their FileMaker 6 databases without massive problems. Backward compatibility? Never heard of it!

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post #4 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post

But they still can't figure out how to open one of their FileMaker 6 databases without massive problems. Backward compatibility? Never heard of it!

It is not the latest iteration not able to open the last version but the last version to open the latest version files.

Why not ask Adobe why their last version can't open the latest version file.

One of the latest version features is using the camera in the iOS devices for scanning and this makes google glass usage in the enterprise DOA.
post #5 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by AdamC View Post


It is not the latest iteration not able to open the last version but the last version to open the latest version files.

Why not ask Adobe why their last version can't open the latest version file.

One of the latest version features is using the camera in the iOS devices for scanning and this makes google glass usage in the enterprise DOA.

 

I'm staying away from the latest Adobe software like the plague.

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post #6 of 47

Interesting. Hopefully the new browser feature means that someone will use Filemaker to create a great CRM product.

 

Of course, Filemaker is probably still hobbled by its inability to play nice with OS X's Contacts and Calendar.

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post #7 of 47

FileMaker Pro 6 was released in 2002, which means almost 12 years ago.

 

You CAN open a FileMaker 6 database in FileMaker 12, but you have to first convert to FileMaker Pro 7, 8, 9, 10 or 11. This takes no time at all; simply open the database in the newer version and FileMaker converts it for you.


From here you can convert your database to FileMaker 12 (or now 13); version 12 added massive new features that include lots of CSS styling, which necessitated a new file structure.

 

If you're still using FileMaker 6, are you also still using Windows XP, or God forbid, Windows Milennium? If you're on a Mac, are you still running Mac OS X 10.1, which was released in 2002? I doubt it.

 

 

FileMaker has gone to great pains to make sure that users of antiquated versions aren't orphaned... and yes, FM 6 is an antique.

post #8 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by longterm View Post
 

FileMaker Pro 6 was released in 2002, which means almost 12 years ago.

 

You CAN open a FileMaker 6 database in FileMaker 12, but you have to first convert to FileMaker Pro 7, 8, 9, 10 or 11. This takes no time at all; simply open the database in the newer version and FileMaker converts it for you.


From here you can convert your database to FileMaker 12 (or now 13); version 12 added massive new features that include lots of CSS styling, which necessitated a new file structure.

 

If you're still using FileMaker 6, are you also still using Windows XP, or God forbid, Windows Milennium? If you're on a Mac, are you still running Mac OS X 10.1, which was released in 2002? I doubt it.

 

 

FileMaker has gone to great pains to make sure that users of antiquated versions aren't orphaned... and yes, FM 6 is an antique.

 

And therein lies the problem. FM7 ruins FM6 databases, so it's economically unfeasible to update. I'll stick with the "antique".

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post #9 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post

But they still can't figure out how to open one of their FileMaker 6 databases without massive problems. Backward compatibility? Never heard of it!

As opposed to Microsoft who breaks EVERY version of Access with each new release?

 

FM Pro can open FM7 files. FM6 hasn't been supported in god nows when and you're complaining about an ancient file format that no one uses anymore?

post #10 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post
 

 

And therein lies the problem. FM7 ruins FM6 databases, so it's economically unfeasible to update. I'll stick with the "antique".

You say "FM7 ruins FM6 databases;" that's totally not true. Explain how it "ruins" older databases.

 

I'm a certified developer in the last 4 versions, started using FileMaker in version 2. I can say with authority that it doesn't "ruin" older versions.

 

Some older commands were changed to fit with current structure, but there is NOTHING about converting that "ruins" an older database. I suspect that your database is poorly-written and you are afraid that conversion will force you to clean up some of the mess, but that's not FileMaker's problem, that's the problem with using a poorly-written solution.

 

There are about a thousand reasons why you should've moved into a newer version of FileMaker; here are a few off the top of my head:

 

It's tons faster--FM 12 is super-fast;

Over a hundred new functions were added since FileMaker 6, functions that make it easier to write great solutions that do more, faster;

Script triggers--scripts can be triggered when a field is entered, exited, a layout is entered, exited, and tons more; this one feature alone is worth upgrading;

CSS-based layouts--they simply look fantastic, and it's really easy to create new layouts that look professional, even when done by a novice;

FM 13 brings even more--great new interface tools like popovers and other tools;

Server tools make it easy to do incremental backups all day long (my biggest client, who has a bunch of 12GB files, backs up every 3 minutes);

and on and on and on...

 

Tell me what problems you think conversion introduces and I bet I can solve it in about 30 seconds.

post #11 of 47
people did some crazy things in FileMaker 6 to implement script parameters, updating value lists and a whole swag of other stuff that used to be "difficult"
the database is not ruined, it may need some of those hacks brought into the 21st century. the performance, the data viewer and the debugger make this a cinch if you have half a brain
post #12 of 47

core2crm? zulu? lmgtfu!

post #13 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by JBFromOZ View Post

people did some crazy things in FileMaker 6 to implement script parameters, updating value lists and a whole swag of other stuff that used to be "difficult"
the database is not ruined, it may need some of those hacks brought into the 21st century. the performance, the data viewer and the debugger make this a cinch if you have half a brain

Well said; I see databases all the time that were badly-designed and hacked together, and clients don't want to lose their valuable work... </sarcasm>

 

A poor craftsman blames his tools.

 

Even if some dodgy methods were used for things like script parameters, a lot of them can probably be made to still work once converting; it wouldn't take long for an experienced FileMaker developer to find and fix any of these issues. It sounds, from what I read in this guy's posts, that he just doesn't want to spend the time.

 

To that I would respond: how much is your business worth? Do you want to stay in 12-year-old technology forever? Sure, Windows XP *works* but why would you want to use it? For that matter, old flip phones work just fine, but who wants to look at a screen that shows a maximum of about 30 characters? 

 

To which he might respond: yeah, but it WORKS.

 

Sure. So does a car that runs on 5 of its 6 cylinders. 

The security benefits in newer versions of FileMaker are enormous; encryption is now built into FileMaker 13. The server uses encryption to communicate with clients across the LAN (has done so for quite a while now); you can have multiple windows. You can have multiple tables in a single database file; I have solutions with over 100 tables in a single file, which makes scripting easier, relationships much easier to deal with...

 

Or he can use 2002 technology. Let's see, in 2002 we had:

 

OS X 10.1

Flip phones

Palm Pilots

Cable modems were the only thing resembling broadband, and they were slooooooow...

post #14 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Frank777 View Post

Of course, Filemaker is probably still hobbled by its inability to play nice with OS X's Contacts and Calendar.

I can't find it on their website if they did. But they still have 30 day trials, so check it out.

One thing they still didn't get right:



It's 2013 for crying out loud; I shouldn't have to deal with hooking up to iTunes, copy pasting stuff in order for it to be on my iPhone. This is Microsoft-stupidity. I want my data synched across all devices, OTA, with iCloud. In the spirit of Jeremy Clarkson: "How hard can it be?"

Bento synced, but you needed to be connected to the same WiFi network and have the app open on both devices.

edit: typo. And this:

"Upload solutions created with FileMaker Pro to FileMaker Server or email to your iPad and iPhone for use in FileMaker Go." That is so 1995
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post #15 of 47
It's still way overpriced. They should have a developer app and a client app, the client app could be the same but with feature lockdown. Most small businesses are put off by the deployment costs when they have to purchase full versions for client machines. It's a really excellent app that needs to be priced and structured better.
post #16 of 47
Definitely come a long way from FM4 and using CDML to get stuff online. My first database-driven site for work used that back in 1998. Those were the days 1smile.gif
post #17 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by uhh-huh-wha? View Post

It's still way overpriced. They should have a developer app and a client app, the client app could be the same but with feature lockdown. Most small businesses are put off by the deployment costs when they have to purchase full versions for client machines. It's a really excellent app that needs to be priced and structured better.

they have a developer app and a client / runtime app generator: http://www.filemaker.com/help/html/fmpa_tools.24.12.html

it's been around since before the MacPlus. You don't have a clue what you're talking about.

the company that originally developed it also developed the app that became PowerPoint (OK nobody's perfect)

"Don't criticize what you cannot understand"... Robert Zimmerman
post #18 of 47
As a long- time user of FileMaker Pro and Bento, when the company left my extensive Bento database workflows high an dry by canceling Bento, why would I ever trust this company again? A database is not like an RTF file. I can obviously not count on future support from this company.
post #19 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post
 

 

And therein lies the problem. FM7 ruins FM6 databases, so it's economically unfeasible to update. I'll stick with the "antique".

 

Very typical 'clueless user' mentality. No clue what's actually going on so just stay in the ice age, blame newer versions of the product and resist change because its inconvenient.  Stick with your antique, a few years from now you'll have no way to upgrade and you'll probably resort to hiring some cheap labour to create a new solution that'll probably have just as many forward compatibility traps.
post #20 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by longterm View Post
 

 I suspect that your database is poorly-written and you are afraid that conversion will force you to clean up some of the mess, but that's not FileMaker's problem, that's the problem with using a poorly-written solution.

 

I work for a technology company that implements enterprise solutions and we frequently have to integrate FileMaker databases.   The biggest problem we see is that so many of these FileMaker databases were written by  amateurs who had no idea how to design a database and they're a total mess (not technically, but intellectually).    FileMaker is easy to use, but it doesn't force one to use standard database design principles.     I usually refer to these databases as "ransom notes".     They're frequently so poorly designed and the cost to convert them is so high that we wind up recommending that the client re-key the data into our database.  

post #21 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by zaba View Post

It's still way overpriced. They should have a developer app and a client app, the client app could be the same but with feature lockdown. Most small businesses are put off by the deployment costs when they have to purchase full versions for client machines. It's a really excellent app that needs to be priced and structured better.

While  I agree that they should have a developer app and client app with different pricing, the cost is a "rounding error" compared to what enterprise solutions like Oracle charge.     

post #22 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post


I can't find it on their website if they did. But they still have 30 day trials, so check it out.

One thing they still didn't get right:



It's 2013 for crying out loud; I shouldn't have to deal with hooking up to iTunes, copy pasting stuff in order for it to be on my iPhone. This is Microsoft-stupidity. I want my data synched across all devices, OTA, with iCloud. In the spirit of Jeremy Clarkson: "How hard can it be?"

Bento synced, but you needed to be connected to the same WiFi network and have the app open on both devices.

edit: typo. And this:

"Upload solutions created with FileMaker Pro to FileMaker Server or email to your iPad and iPhone for use in FileMaker Go." That is so 1995

That's not the only way to use FileMaker databases; there are several, and none of these require your using iTunes:

 

1. Email the database to yourself or someone else; when it arrives in the email, a simple tap on it will prompt you to open it in FileMaker Go.

2. Open the database while it's being hosted on FileMaker Server anywhere in the world.

3. Put the database in Dropbox.

 

 

Where is this "copy-pasting"? The whole idea of a well-designed system is to have the data in ONE place.

post #23 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by zaba View Post

It's still way overpriced. They should have a developer app and a client app, the client app could be the same but with feature lockdown. Most small businesses are put off by the deployment costs when they have to purchase full versions for client machines. It's a really excellent app that needs to be priced and structured better.

Look on FileMaker's site--there ARE two different versions of FileMaker Client.

If your business isn't worth a $200 investment for FileMaker Pro, you probably need to look into a different line of work. How is it that people can expect to run a successful business on $25 software?

Is MS Word cheap? No. How about Powerpoint, Excel, and so on and so on? 

No. Professional-level powerful software is expensive to develop and support, and FileMaker Pro is no exception.

If you look into FileMaker Pro 13, you'll find that it's extremely reasonable; you can now pay a monthly fee for FileMaker Server (which used to be in the $1000 range for FM Server and $1800 for FM Server Advanced) of $29, and run FM Server on a machine.

 

Then, you can buy connections for $5/month each, and use these connections to connect to the server and the databases there. One copy of FM Pro for a developer (or hire a consultant) and you have a really cheap solution:

 

$29/month - server

$25/month - 5 users

 

$54/month for FM Server and all its power, plus the ability for 5 users to connect either with FM Go (which is free) or a browser using the new WebDirect, which looks exactly like the database.

How is this too expensive?

post #24 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by zoetmb View Post
 

 

I work for a technology company that implements enterprise solutions and we frequently have to integrate FileMaker databases.   The biggest problem we see is that so many of these FileMaker databases were written by  amateurs who had no idea how to design a database and they're a total mess (not technically, but intellectually).    FileMaker is easy to use, but it doesn't force one to use standard database design principles.     I usually refer to these databases as "ransom notes".     They're frequently so poorly designed and the cost to convert them is so high that we wind up recommending that the client re-key the data into our database.  

That's the paradox with FileMaker; it's easy to slap together a poorly-designed database, which users then try to have patched so that they work properly.

 

At the same time, extremely complex systems can be written that manage large corporations; I have a system in place that runs 2 museums, from ticketing to giftshop, purchase orders, invoicing, supplies, group scheduling, event booking, and much more. 

FileMaker 13 ships with some excellent templates that can be used right away; other things: FileMaker works with ODBC, can deal with SQL data sources, is completely cross-platform, has the same look and feel on both WIndows and Mac (an important distinction when working with large companies still mired in Windows), can power complex web applications (my website has one on it for the blog, in fact); I've written dozens of web apps that are powered by FileMaker--for ticket purchases, shopping carts, registration sites, and much more.

post #25 of 47

Longterm...can you please message me?

I have some filemaker questions...please.

post #26 of 47
Originally Posted by bonovox View Post
Longterm...can you please message me?

I have some filemaker questions...please.

 

If you want to continue your conversation beyond that first message, give him your e-mail address. The number of PMs you can send is tied to your post count, and you’ll be blocked from sending more unless you post here some more.

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post #27 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by longterm View Post
 

That's the paradox with FileMaker; it's easy to slap together a poorly-designed database, which users then try to have patched so that they work properly.

 

At the same time, extremely complex systems can be written that manage large corporations; I have a system in place that runs 2 museums, from ticketing to giftshop, purchase orders, invoicing, supplies, group scheduling, event booking, and much more. 

FileMaker 13 ships with some excellent templates that can be used right away; other things: FileMaker works with ODBC, can deal with SQL data sources, is completely cross-platform, has the same look and feel on both WIndows and Mac (an important distinction when working with large companies still mired in Windows), can power complex web applications (my website has one on it for the blog, in fact); I've written dozens of web apps that are powered by FileMaker--for ticket purchases, shopping carts, registration sites, and much more.

 

Absolutely. I'm likely moving my invoicing to a full fledged accounting app for 2014, but I've used Filemaker for invoicing and contact management for much of the last two decades. It's a great and powerful app.

 

As regulars will know, my only big problem with Filemaker is the lack of integration with Contacts and Calendar.

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post #28 of 47

Tallest...thanks for th einfo...new here and didn't know that.

 

CSRNICEK@yahoo.com

post #29 of 47

CSRNICEK@yahoo.com

post #30 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by zoetmb View Post

They're frequently so poorly designed and the cost to convert them is so high that we wind up recommending that the client re-key the data into our database.

Can't imagine they stay being your clients. Who in the hell tells them to 're-enter the data' into this new fantastic DB we build for you? Darn, no import tool whatsoever?
Quote:
Originally Posted by longterm View Post

1. Email the database to yourself or someone else; when it arrives in the email, a simple tap on it will prompt you to open it in FileMaker Go.
2. Open the database while it's being hosted on FileMaker Server anywhere in the world.
3. Put the database in Dropbox.

1. That'll be a static, stand-alone DB then. And there's a size limit in the iPhone. And hat isn't a solution, it's a workaround. Whatever changes you made won't be seen by others who use the DB on the server.
2. Right, for which you'll need internet access. What about a single-user DB situation, wanting to make changes on their iPhone, or iPad, or Mac, or PC? Have it synched the next time you have internet or LAN access. This is no more complicated that say, Notes being synced across all devices.
3. Viable option. That might work; I believe DB Dropbox can be accessed off-line as well. Thanks, I'll try that.
Quote:
Where is this "copy-pasting"? The whole idea of a well-designed system is to have the data in ONE place.

Precisely, which is why you don't want to email it to yourself; it'll become a read-only option.
Edited by PhilBoogie - 12/4/13 at 9:39am
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post #31 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by longterm View Post
 

Look on FileMaker's site--there ARE two different versions of FileMaker Client.

If your business isn't worth a $200 investment for FileMaker Pro, you probably need to look into a different line of work. How is it that people can expect to run a successful business on $25 software?

Is MS Word cheap? No. How about Powerpoint, Excel, and so on and so on? 

No. Professional-level powerful software is expensive to develop and support, and FileMaker Pro is no exception.

If you look into FileMaker Pro 13, you'll find that it's extremely reasonable; you can now pay a monthly fee for FileMaker Server (which used to be in the $1000 range for FM Server and $1800 for FM Server Advanced) of $29, and run FM Server on a machine.

 

Then, you can buy connections for $5/month each, and use these connections to connect to the server and the databases there. One copy of FM Pro for a developer (or hire a consultant) and you have a really cheap solution:

 

$29/month - server

$25/month - 5 users

 

$54/month for FM Server and all its power, plus the ability for 5 users to connect either with FM Go (which is free) or a browser using the new WebDirect, which looks exactly like the database.

How is this too expensive?

 

Open source ones are free.   Yes, use the popular ones which have excellent online forums and resources for support.  

post #32 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post


Can't imagine they stay being your clients. Who in the hell tells them to 're-enter the data' into this new fantastic DB we build for you? Darn, no import tool whatsoever?

1. That'll be a static, stand-alone DB then. And there's a size limit in the iPhone. And hat isn't a solution, it's a workaround. Whatever changes you made won't be seen by others who use the DB on the server.
2. Right, for which you'll need internet access. What about a single-user DB situation, wanting to make changes on their iPhone, or iPad, or Mac, or PC? Have it synched the next time you have internet or LAN access. This is no more complicated that say, Notes being synced across all devices.
3. Viable option. That might work; I believe DB Dropbox can be accessed off-line as well. Thanks, I'll try that.
Precisely, which is why you don't want to email it to yourself; it'll become a read-only option.

FIleMaker imports from CSV, Excel, Bento, tab-delimited; it can also pull from ODBC and SQL data sources.

 

1. No, there isn't a size limit in the iPhone, other than the amount of storage space you have. Some people use solutions that are single-user, and in this instance it works great to have a FM database locally stored on an iOS device.

 

You can have the database hosted on FileMaker Server, which is a smart way to go. Not a workaround. This is what most of my clients choose; however, with the sync methods already available, the latest thinking is to use the database locally (which will always be faster than connecting--plus, some people might not always have reliable Internet connections on their iOS devices), and then using a sync method (360 Works makes one, as does Seedcode--both are excellent), you can sync whenever you're at a place with good Internet. This works really well for lots of situations.

 

2. There are lots of sync solutions for FileMaker; several 3rd-party companies have stepped up with some amazing methods (see above).

 

Emailing to oneself doesn't make it read-only; it's a method for getting the database onto an iOS device very easily. 

 

You can also have the database up on the web somewhere and load it by clicking the link, which pulls the DB down to the iOS device, at which point a prompt alerts you to store it or open it in FileMaker Go.

post #33 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by ipen View Post
 

 

Open source ones are free.   Yes, use the popular ones which have excellent online forums and resources for support.  

You get what you pay for.

 

Name a single open-source database platform that does these things:

 

a) is cross-platform;

b) talks to a wide variety of data sources, including ODBC and SQL sources;

c) imports from lots of formats;

d) exports likewise;

e) has the ability to be configured to meet a user's needs;

f) has a decent UI.

 

MySQL is free, but it has no UI; it's an excellent database for some things, but for clients who need a good front end, it's not a great choice.

 

MS Notepad comes free with Windows; that doesn't make it useful for more than casual text storage.

post #34 of 47
I have one word - Bento - brings me back to the good old days of Claris - they develop and market a product for years - literally years - as a user you invest a ton of time into using it - and then one day they just drop it. Sorry but Bento was the last Filemaker product I'll ever buy. Adobe and Autodesk are also on the "there must be a better way" list.
post #35 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by longterm View Post

FIleMaker imports from CSV, Excel, Bento, tab-delimited; it can also pull from ODBC and SQL data sources.

Indeed, hence why I don't understand why he tells his clients to re-enter the data into the newly created FM DB.
Quote:
1. No, there isn't a size limit in the iPhone, other than the amount of storage space you have. Some people use solutions that are single-user, and in this instance it works great to have a FM database locally stored on an iOS device.

There is, I think it's 25MB or 50MB per email, I forgot.

Sure, accessing is great, but I also want any changes synced back to the server once connected.

Quote:
You can have the database hosted on FileMaker Server, which is a smart way to go. Not a workaround. This is what most of my clients choose; however, with the sync methods already available, the latest thinking is to use the database locally (which will always be faster than connecting--plus, some people might not always have reliable Internet connections on their iOS devices), and then using a sync method (360 Works makes one, as does Seedcode--both are excellent), you can sync whenever you're at a place with good Internet. This works really well for lots of situations.

So no native syncing from FM themselves? Bento used to do that, but was (or is being) EOL'd. Therefore I think this is a workaround, though putting your DB's on a server is of course the way to go.

Anyway, big thanks for these 3rd party tips!
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post #36 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post


Indeed, hence why I don't understand why he tells his clients to re-enter the data into the newly created FM DB.
There is, I think it's 25MB or 50MB per email, I forgot.

Sure, accessing is great, but I also want any changes synced back to the server once connected.
So no native syncing from FM themselves? Bento used to do that, but was (or is being) EOL'd. Therefore I think this is a workaround, though putting your DB's on a server is of course the way to go.

Anyway, big thanks for these 3rd party tips!

No, FileMaker doesn't have any native sync method, but the 2 I mentioned (from Seedcode and from 360 Works) are excellent. They came about after an unconference where about 100 of us developers kicked around the best way to deal with data syncing on handhelds when connectivity can be an issue (like in a hotel with bad wifi, for example). Both are super slick and fully-developed, and easy to integrate into existing solutions.

 

Bento was EOLed because it just didn't provide enough revenue; in addition, FileMaker has become an excellent tool for iOS devices, and with the templates that are provided, can do a lot of what people used in Bento. I never used Bento much, but it did seem like a decent low-end solution, but it all comes down to revenue--if a company can't pay its employees, development suffers, innovation stops, the platform dies.

 

Check out http://www.seedcode.com; John Sindelar is a first-class FileMaker developer and has a free calendar for FileMaker that integrates with Google Calendar, does a lot more as well. His sync solution is great.

 

360 Works (http://www.360works.com) makes lots of things, including a new sync solution that is really great; their card-processing plugin is the FileMaker standard too, is what we use in our company as well.

WorldSync (http://www.worldsync.com) also has a new sync solution, but I don't know much about it yet.

post #37 of 47
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Originally Posted by longterm View Post

^ post

Thanks much for al the additional 3rd party info and experience. I will look at these options one by one, try them out.

Fully agree and understand the Bento 'situation'. Besides, it was way too limited for my needs. I used to develop DB's, but it was years ago. Just last week I was asked to develop a DB for a Windows user and if nothing changed, I can create and test it all on my Mac and simply copy it to their Windows environment and it all works.

I most certainly look forward to all the enhancements that were added. And the latest version looks incredibly enticing.
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post #38 of 47
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Originally Posted by adeen View Post

I have one word - Bento - brings me back to the good old days of Claris - they develop and market a product for years - literally years - as a user you invest a ton of time into using it - and then one day they just drop it. Sorry but Bento was the last Filemaker product I'll ever buy. Adobe and Autodesk are also on the "there must be a better way" list.

 

Okay, that's really funny, but a bit one-sided.

 

I've advocated that Filemaker create Project Management and CRM products based on Filemaker, but the former Claris had gone hogwild in the old days creating CAD, Animation, Web development, Email, Calendar and Form Design software. And I'm guessing each of those had a distinctly different codebase.

 

Most of those niches were upended (multiple times) by the web, and in the dark days when Apple's future was...um...'beleaguered', difficult decisions had to be made. I miss HomePage and Organizer too. But they did the right thing. They couldn't keep all that going.

 

The most hilarious part was when the ClarisWorks team lost faith and decamped for BeOS, which turned out to be an even worse place to go.


Edited by Frank777 - 12/4/13 at 1:36pm
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post #39 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by longterm View Post
 

No, FileMaker doesn't have any native sync method, but the 2 I mentioned (from Seedcode and from 360 Works) are excellent. They came about after an unconference where about 100 of us developers kicked around the best way to deal with data syncing on handhelds when connectivity can be an issue (like in a hotel with bad wifi, for example). Both are super slick and fully-developed, and easy to integrate into existing solutions.

 

This is what worries me most about Filemaker. There are ridiculously talented FM developers who can do amazing things with the software.

There's a large user community built around the software, and by all accounts developers are friendly and open.

 

And yet nobody can come up with an easy way to integrate OS X's Contacts and Calendar? After a decade of requests?

 

If it hasn't happened by now, is it ever going to happen?

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post #40 of 47
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Originally Posted by Frank777 View Post
 

 

This is what worries me most about Filemaker. There are ridiculously talented FM developers who can do amazing things with the software.

There's a large user community built around the software, and by all accounts developers are friendly and open.

 

And yet nobody can come up with an easy way to integrate OS X's Contacts and Calendar? After a decade of requests?

 

If it hasn't happened by now, is it ever going to happen?

I assume Apple's not letting them get to the contacts & calendar like they need...

 

As to whether it's going to happen, who knows... I don't think it's Filemaker that's not trying to make it work, rather that Apple's not exposing the hooks that FileMaker would need in order to write to contacts & calendar.

I have a plugin that I use that will write TO Contacts, but it doesn't pull from, nor does it sync; it merely writes to Contacts when I tell it to. 

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