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Apple's 'smart dock' would give Siri a permanent place in the home

post #1 of 46
Thread Starter 
The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office on Thursday published an Apple patent application detailing a full-function "smart dock" that continually listens for cues to activate and communicate with the voice recognition functions of docked devices, like the iPhone and iPad.

Dock
Source: USPTO


Apple's "Smart dock for activating a voice recognition mode of a portable electronic device" filing clearly describes an iOS device accessory unlike anything the company has manufactured. Like third-party peripherals, Apple's proposed dock can include a speaker, microphone and built-in screen, but goes further by allowing access to the Siri virtual assistant.

Currently, Apple's only docking solutions for both the iPhone and iPad are limited to charging and line-out audio. In contrast, the proposed dock would have a screen, tactile controls or a touch panel with which a user can interface. Other embodiments include a scroll wheel, buttons and other manual controls.

Instead of carrying Siri onboard, the dock would be mostly headless until an iPhone or iPad was operatively coupled to the unit. Basic functionality like a clock and radio are provided, but voice recognition and heavy processing are accomplished by the iOS device.

Basically, the dock listens for a specific prompt, recognizes an activation request by the user, relays commands to the docked iPhone and executes any operations returned by the device. Examples could be playing a song or facilitating communication between the user and Siri.

Dock


In operation, a user would perform an initial setup that would include assigning an audio prompt, such as a spoken word or hand clap, that will be used to activate the unit and its services. For example, a user may want to set the prompt as a finger snap. When in listening mode, if the dock "hears" a finger snap, it will activate the iPhone's voice recognition feature.

By setting listening thresholds, the dock can selectively filter out ambient noise while still allowing a user to operate their device remotely using only audio cues. Since the system relies primarily on audio input, an effective limiter must be implemented to ignore responses by Siri. In these scenarios, the dock would deactivate listening mode during voice recognition operations.

Internal components include a wireless communications module for accessing off-site databases and Internet assets like webpages or cloud storage. If, for example, a user wanted to change their schedule for the day, they could initiate Siri via the always-listening dock and modify a calendar stored in iCloud.

Dock


In addition to the built-in hardware, the dock can also be fitted with add-ons like a removable hard drive, environmental sensors, a GPS module and more. Some embodiments allow for the dock and iOS device to be paired but uncoupled, meaning the dock would transform into a sort of smart wireless speaker system.

Finally, users can force the dock to deactivate Siri by issuing a verbal command or other audio input. Alternatively, the dock itself can time out Siri voice recognition and put the iOS device to sleep after a predetermined time period. There is also a provision for wireless inductive charging.

Apple's smart dock patent application was first filed for in May 2012 and credits Scott Krueger, Jesse Dorogusker and Erik Wang as its inventors.
post #2 of 46
Google Now initiates on some Android phones by saying 'Google' without the requirement of a dock (horrid activation word, I know). 'Apple' would be horrid, too, but 'Siri' would sound appropriate. If Google can listen for the keyword without killing battery, why can't the iPhone?
Edited by Ireland - 12/5/13 at 4:26am
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post #3 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland View Post

Google's system works on some Android phone by saying 'Google' to initiate the listening state (horrid activation word, I know). 'Apple' would be horrid, too, but 'Siri' would sound appropriate.

 

 

Appropriate to whom?

 

Both want to sell you things, right?

So Google wins.

Google = Google

Siri = A long way, for the majority to single out Apple.

post #4 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland View Post

Google Now initiates on some Android phones by saying 'Google' without the requirement of a dock (horrid activation word, I know). 'Apple' would be horrid, too, but 'Siri' would sound appropriate. If Google can listen for the keyword without killing battery, why can't the iPhone?

Don't see why we can't set our own keyword.  If I want to shout "hey buttwad" to activate Siri, that's my choice.

 

I think the MotoX, which does the "listening in" most effectively has a dedicated chip, a bit like the M7 is for exercise; so the main processor isn't active which saves power.  Maybe something similar for the iPhone 6?

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post #5 of 46
Ok, Glass with champagne is what I raise with this patent. Though I don't understand why I would need to dock my iPhone. Apple is all about wireless, I thought. Maybe they want us to dock a 12.9" device.
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post #6 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post

Ok, Glass with champagne is what I raise with this patent. Though I don't understand why I would need to dock my iPhone. Apple is all about wireless, I thought. Maybe they want us to dock a 12.9" device.

On a tangential thought here ... How far off can Siri for OS X be I wonder?
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post #7 of 46

After big brother was watching you, little sister is now also listening.

That is definitely the last thing I'd want in my home.

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post #8 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post

Ok, Glass with champagne is what I raise with this patent. Though I don't understand why I would need to dock my iPhone. Apple is all about wireless, I thought. Maybe they want us to dock a 12.9" device.

On a tangential thought here ... How far off can Siri for OS X be I wonder?

With iOS users outnumbering OSX with a 10 to 1, I'd say it'd only requires a dot release update to OSX, possibly even add it to 10.8 as well. Dictation also came to the Mac after all. Good call.
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post #9 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ochyming View Post

Appropriate to whom?

 

Both want to sell you things, right?

So Google wins.

Google = Google

Siri = A long way, for the majority to single out Apple.

 

Never design my products.

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post #10 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crowley View Post
 

Don't see why we can't set our own keyword.  If I want to shout "hey buttwad" to activate Siri, that's my choice.

 

That's a different point; I don't disagree with that.

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post #11 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by G-News View Post

After big brother was watching you, little sister is now also listening.
That is definitely the last thing I'd want in my home.

I love security cameras, I love voice recognition.

I HATE security cameras that don't have a built-in web server and instead require you to stream your life to a 3rd party service where you can access your own video feed through a web page, and I HATE voice recognition that's cloud based.

Until such point when Apple allows users to own their iOS devices (read gives them root access so you can inspect processes and network connections to see what's going on), and until Siri is locally processed, if you have any of these security cameras and/or permanent Siri active, you might as well get your house permanently wire tapped and video recorded by "the government of the free world".

Amazing: back in 1984 everyone was going ape-shit about Orwells book with the same year as title, but when the reality of what Orwell was talking about gets implemented, people are already so brainwashed that they'd piss away any form of liberty, freedom, self-control, privacy just for the convenience of having it easier to order a pizza online without lifting their fat asses off the couch while watching sports.

Is anyone still awake?

What Apple describes is great technology, if it runs on your own private server or device, locally, and such fact can be verified. It's not ok if it's a cloudy cloud service with nebulous control protocols and known data vacuum cleaners in the middle.
post #12 of 46

Interesting, although I'd rather see it as a standalone device with Siri built-in. Would be extremely handy in a home automation situation ... control lights, temp, TV/music/etc. PhilBoogie might be onto something with the 12.9" device docking, though...

post #13 of 46

I am sorry, geeks just do not get it. Yeah it would be cool to voice command everything in your house and in life. For those of you who are married and have kids how well does that work ordering them around. It does not, there is a whole social aspect to these kind of technologies which most geeks fail to understand, you look like an idiot talking to your equipment and I am not the equipment in your pants, that another issue all together.

 

This is no different than people who still walk around with a Bluetooth ear piece, you look like an idiot and even worse if you are walking around talking on it in a crowd of people. Sitting in your house with other people around and saying words like "Google" or "Siri" do this or that you being looking like a fool and it lacks all kind of social grace of what you do and not do in a room full of people. Then add in when people realize you have no clue, they start messing with you by telling your equipment to do things since these things will listen to anyone's voice not just yours.

 

If you live alone and never interact with the outside world or people in general talking to your equipment is probably fine. But at some point people begin to realize others are looking at them funny and stop the ridiculous behavior. Google glass go up there with it net technologies but fails on social level.

post #14 of 46
i seem to remember os 9 have a feature whereby it would listen for a configurable command word (e.g., "computer") and then perform functions based on what followed.

"computer ... open email"

"computer ... tell me a joke"

it surprises me that it's taken this long for things to come full circle (although i have no doubt that this will be a lot more powerful and flexible, etc.)
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post #15 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maestro64 View Post
 

I am sorry, geeks just do not get it. Yeah it would be cool to voice command everything in your house and in life. 

 

I partially feel this way, but let me tell you... after a weeklong road trip this summer, using Siri in the car... it was awkward at first, but by the third day, I had no trouble talking to Siri and asking for directions, sending text messages, looking up the nearest gas station. It didn't take long to make it feel completely natural. These shifts can happen so quickly. 

post #16 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by rcfa View Post

I love security cameras, I love voice recognition.

I HATE security cameras that don't have a built-in web server and instead require you to stream your life to a 3rd party service where you can access your own video feed through a web page, and I HATE voice recognition that's cloud based.

Until such point when Apple allows users to own their iOS devices (read gives them root access so you can inspect processes and network connections to see what's going on), and until Siri is locally processed, if you have any of these security cameras and/or permanent Siri active, you might as well get your house permanently wire tapped and video recorded by "the government of the free world".

Amazing: back in 1984 everyone was going ape-shit about Orwells book with the same year as title, but when the reality of what Orwell was talking about gets implemented, people are already so brainwashed that they'd piss away any form of liberty, freedom, self-control, privacy just for the convenience of having it easier to order a pizza online without lifting their fat asses off the couch while watching sports.

Is anyone still awake?

What Apple describes is great technology, if it runs on your own private server or device, locally, and such fact can be verified. It's not ok if it's a cloudy cloud service with nebulous control protocols and known data vacuum cleaners in the middle.


Hear hear!

If I could vote your post up x10 I'd do it.
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post #17 of 46

It may not be long before all we need is an iPhone, a microphone (with on/off button) and an earphone to control our home automation, car, computing devices and our personal Apple Robot.

post #18 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maestro64 View Post

I am sorry, geeks just do not get it. Yeah it would be cool to voice command everything in your house and in life. For those of you who are married and have kids how well does that work ordering them around. It does not, there is a whole social aspect to these kind of technologies which most geeks fail to understand, you look like an idiot talking to your equipment and I am not the equipment in your pants, that another issue all together.



This is no different than people who still walk around with a Bluetooth ear piece, you look like an idiot and even worse if you are walking around talking on it in a crowd of people. Sitting in your house with other people around and saying words like "Google" or "Siri" do this or that you being looking like a fool and it lacks all kind of social grace of what you do and not do in a room full of people. Then add in when people realize you have no clue, they start messing with you by telling your equipment to do things since these things will listen to anyone's voice not just yours.



If you live alone and never interact with the outside world or people in general talking to your equipment is probably fine. But at some point people begin to realize others are looking at them funny and stop the ridiculous behavior. Google glass go up there with it net technologies but fails on social level.




I agree with you for now, and I don't want to see things change, but jakeb has a point.

How many people here remember when cell phones were first coming into popularity? It was a HUGE faux pas in many circles to be seen or heard using them. I got scowls and less-than-nice comments from random people in public, and even verbal reprimands from relatives. Not because I was being loud or obnoxious, but because it was considered pretentious and just plain "not cool" to be using that kind of device. My how things change!

I do agree that the usage will be very different if you're alone vs. with family or friends, but I wouldn't count out the possibility that people will end up talking to their homes. My biggest hope is that, like rcfa, those conversations don't leave the house out to the cloud and back. Personally, I won't use anything that does, ever.
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post #19 of 46
Three things piqued my interest:
  1. A rather innocuous, dumb, passive device like a dock can use an intelligent device (iPhone, iPad, iMac, AppleTV, Camera, etc.) as a peripheral.
  2. The dock device doesn't necessarily need to be large or plugged into a power source.
  3. The dock device doesn't necessarily need to be physically connected to the peripheral.


Below, is Apple's drawing of the dock -- large and ugly, IMO.

Below that, is a picture of a StickNFind BLE beacon that can be used as an iBeacon. It is about the size of a quarter, cost $25 each (in quantities of 2) and includes a battery that lasts 2 years. These particular beacons have a built-in Alarm and LED Flasher as well as 2 counters.

https://www.sticknfind.com/default.aspx


I can't find hardware specs on the StickNFind... but based on similar devices I would guess it contains, an ARM CPU, Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) chip and antenna, reloadable Firmware, RAM... Actually, it's a little computer.

In addition, the Bluetooth SIG has just redefined/expanded the BLE spec in ways that give it more speed, reliability and control.

Taken together, I can envision several specialized beacons that could act as sensors/intermediaries to cause, say, your iPad to be connected to your sound system... or as others have said, snap your fingers and a specialized beacon listens for an audible command that is sent to Siri via your iPhone to do whatever...


Or, that little dumb iWatch on your wrist can use an iDevice on your person or an iMac in your house/office as a peripheral at your command...


Curiouser and curiouser...


Edit:

My subconscious chewed on this idea of BLE beacons acting as intermediaries between you and your electronics... They shouldn't be called "beacons"... and "intermediaries" doesn't really describe what they do...

Rather, they are your "minions"... Your BLE Minions!

Ha! Say, Bill is on the phone and he wants to "get together" with you and a few others... You just tell Bill: "Have your people [minions] get in touch with my people [minions]...

I wonder if there is a protocol or "power status" on whose minion initiates the contact 1cool.gif


Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

13.12.05-Dock-1.jpg




Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post

Ok, Glass with champagne is what I raise with this patent. Though I don't understand why I would need to dock my iPhone. Apple is all about wireless, I thought. Maybe they want us to dock a 12.9" device.

Edited by Dick Applebaum - 12/5/13 at 11:21am
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post #20 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post

Ok, Glass with champagne is what I raise with this patent. Though I don't understand why I would need to dock my iPhone. Apple is all about wireless, I thought. Maybe they want us to dock a 12.9" device.

On a tangential thought here ... How far off can Siri for OS X be I wonder?

With iOS users outnumbering OSX with a 10 to 1, I'd say it'd only requires a dot release update to OSX, possibly even add it to 10.8 as well. Dictation also came to the Mac after all. Good call.

I suspect that:
  • Apple already has OSX Mavericks running on iPads.
  • Apple already has iOS 7 running on Macs (both ARM and Intel).
  • everything implemented for either OS is implemented for the other.

An example of iOS running on Macs is the iOS Simulator.
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post #21 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maestro64 View Post

I am sorry, geeks just do not get it. Yeah it would be cool to voice command everything in your house and in life. For those of you who are married and have kids how well does that work ordering them around. It does not, there is a whole social aspect to these kind of technologies which most geeks fail to understand, you look like an idiot talking to your equipment and I am not the equipment in your pants, that another issue all together.

This is no different than people who still walk around with a Bluetooth ear piece, you look like an idiot and even worse if you are walking around talking on it in a crowd of people. Sitting in your house with other people around and saying words like "Google" or "Siri" do this or that you being looking like a fool and it lacks all kind of social grace of what you do and not do in a room full of people. Then add in when people realize you have no clue, they start messing with you by telling your equipment to do things since these things will listen to anyone's voice not just yours.

If you live alone and never interact with the outside world or people in general talking to your equipment is probably fine. But at some point people begin to realize others are looking at them funny and stop the ridiculous behavior. Google glass go up there with it net technologies but fails on social level.

I use Siri, successfully, all the time while sitting in my chair, the TV blaring, the grandkids fuss in'...

It is amazing how well the noise-cancelling mics/software work on the later iDevices.
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post #22 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

I use Siri, successfully, all the time while sitting in my chair, the TV blaring, the grandkids fuss in'...

It is amazing how well the noise-cancelling mics/software work on the later iDevices.
For those curious about how noise-cancellation works on newer smartphones (the particular phone isn't all that important):
http://mobiledeviceinsight.com/2012/01/smartphone-audio-design-dual-noise-cancellation/
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post #23 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland View Post

Google Now initiates on some Android phones by saying 'Google' without the requirement of a dock (horrid activation word, I know). 'Apple' would be horrid, too, but 'Siri' would sound appropriate. If Google can listen for the keyword without killing battery, why can't the iPhone?

 

This really is a different idea. Here Apple is creating a charging/speaker system that also can activate Siri. Maybe the idea is not mutually exclusive with also providing a standalone version of Google Now's feature, but maybe Apple does not want to go that route for other reasons (patents, doesn't like it, etc.). 

post #24 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

I can't find hardware specs on the StickNFind

Me neither, except for the battery: CR2016 watch battery. Nothing on http://www.fcc.gov?
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post #25 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

I suspect that:
  • Apple already has OSX Mavericks running on iPads.
  • Apple already has iOS 7 running on Macs (both ARM and Intel).
  • everything implemented for either OS is implemented for the other.

An example of iOS running on Macs is the iOS Simulator.

I think the first two the UI needs to be redesigned for the product. There's really no need for iOS UI elements to be large enough for a finger when we interact with a mouse pointer on a bitmap screen. And visa versa.

Your 3rd 'suspision' is interesting; there certainly are iOS apps that would be great to have on the lap/desktop as well. And visa versa.
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post #26 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by TBell View Post
 

 

This really is a different idea. Here Apple is creating a charging/speaker system that also can activate Siri. Maybe the idea is not mutually exclusive with also providing a standalone version of Google Now's feature, but maybe Apple does not want to go that route for other reasons (patents, doesn't like it, etc.). 

 

I'm not convinced. And I'm certainly not convinced be this product idea.

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post #27 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

I suspect that:
  • Apple already has OSX Mavericks running on iPads.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=blovyPQ0MPg
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post #28 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

I can't find hardware specs on the StickNFind

Me neither, except for the battery: CR2016 watch battery. Nothing on http://www.fcc.gov?

I also have 6 Estimote beacons, shown below. I assume that most BLE beacons on, or coming to, the market have similar specs.


Also, interesting is that Apple is installing iBeacons in its retail stores. No info on which brand of BLE beacons, though...

It is possible that Apple is making its own beacon devices.

Quote:
Estimote Beacon is a tiny computer



Technically speaking, Estimote Beacon is a super small computer. It has a powerful 32-bit ARM® Cortex M0 CPU with 256kB flash memory, accelerometer, temperature sensor and what is most important – 2.4 GHz Bluetooth 4.0 Smart (also known as BLE or Bluetooth low energy) bidirectional radio.

But it's not the same old Bluetooth your mother would use (the one that required pairing and never actually worked). It's a completely new, redesigned standard developed by Nokia™ that is now implemented in all modern smartphones like Apple iPhone™ 4S or Samsung™ Galaxy S III, and other smart devices like Google Glass™, Fitbit trackers or smartwatches.

It's called low-energy because it really is. BLE devices can run up to 2+ years with a single coin battery depending on the signal strenth and how frequent they broadcast information around.

http://estimote.com/api/
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post #29 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

I also have 6 Estimote beacons, shown below. I assume that most BLE beacons on, or coming to, the market have similar specs.


Also, interesting is that Apple is installing iBeacons in its retail stores. No info on which brand of BLE beacons, though...

As always you should take the few minutes it requires to read over the TOS/Privacy Policies for any of the new Beacon services before using them on your smart device. Forewarned and all that. For instance when you use the recently announced (beta) Macy iBeacon program this is what you've agreed to:
http://shopkick.com/privacy-and-tos
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post #30 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

^ post

Thanks for that link. I look forward to see you finish your software and hopefully to be able to buy it on the App Store!
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post #31 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maestro64 View Post
 

I am sorry, geeks just do not get it. Yeah it would be cool to voice command everything in your house and in life. For those of you who are married and have kids how well does that work ordering them around. It does not, there is a whole social aspect to these kind of technologies which most geeks fail to understand, you look like an idiot talking to your equipment and I am not the equipment in your pants, that another issue all together.

 

This is no different than people who still walk around with a Bluetooth ear piece, you look like an idiot and even worse if you are walking around talking on it in a crowd of people. Sitting in your house with other people around and saying words like "Google" or "Siri" do this or that you being looking like a fool and it lacks all kind of social grace of what you do and not do in a room full of people. Then add in when people realize you have no clue, they start messing with you by telling your equipment to do things since these things will listen to anyone's voice not just yours.

 

If you live alone and never interact with the outside world or people in general talking to your equipment is probably fine. But at some point people begin to realize others are looking at them funny and stop the ridiculous behavior. Google glass go up there with it net technologies but fails on social level.

 

I don't understand why giving instructions to your phone is any different than having a phone call.  You're talking into the mic in both use cases.  Speakerphone conversations are especially analogous (but I think speakerphone calls in public are obnoxious).  You'll warm up to it eventually.

 

As far as anyone being able to command your system, I don't think that would be allowed.  The Moto X "takes a fingerprint" of your voice so that only you can give it commands.  The same technology will make its way to other companies.

post #32 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post

Ok, Glass with champagne is what I raise with this patent. Though I don't understand why I would need to dock my iPhone. Apple is all about wireless, I thought. Maybe they want us to dock a 12.9" device.
Well obviously the dock is so you can charge and it will not drain battery, also assuming the dock has other features(if it has mic, it has speakers) has maybe lights, and connection to a TV.
post #33 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by jakeb View Post
 

 

I partially feel this way, but let me tell you... after a weeklong road trip this summer, using Siri in the car... it was awkward at first, but by the third day, I had no trouble talking to Siri and asking for directions, sending text messages, looking up the nearest gas station. It didn't take long to make it feel completely natural. These shifts can happen so quickly. 

To my point you are alone in your car, I use voice command with my phone as well in my car, but in my home I do not talk to my electronic, especially when people are around.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Blah64 View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maestro64 View Post
 

I am sorry, geeks just do not get it. Yeah it would be cool to voice command everything in your house and in life. For those of you who are married and have kids how well does that work ordering them around. It does not, there is a whole social aspect to these kind of technologies which most geeks fail to understand, you look like an idiot talking to your equipment and I am not the equipment in your pants, that another issue all together.

 

This is no different than people who still walk around with a Bluetooth ear piece, you look like an idiot and even worse if you are walking around talking on it in a crowd of people. Sitting in your house with other people around and saying words like "Google" or "Siri" do this or that you being looking like a fool and it lacks all kind of social grace of what you do and not do in a room full of people. Then add in when people realize you have no clue, they start messing with you by telling your equipment to do things since these things will listen to anyone's voice not just yours.

 

If you live alone and never interact with the outside world or people in general talking to your equipment is probably fine. But at some point people begin to realize others are looking at them funny and stop the ridiculous behavior. Google glass go up there with it net technologies but fails on social level.



I agree with you for now, and I don't want to see things change, but jakeb has a point.

How many people here remember when cell phones were first coming into popularity? It was a HUGE faux pas in many circles to be seen or heard using them. I got scowls and less-than-nice comments from random people in public, and even verbal reprimands from relatives. Not because I was being loud or obnoxious, but because it was considered pretentious and just plain "not cool" to be using that kind of device. My how things change!

I do agree that the usage will be very different if you're alone vs. with family or friends, but I wouldn't count out the possibility that people will end up talking to their homes. My biggest hope is that, like rcfa, those conversations don't leave the house out to the cloud and back. Personally, I won't use anything that does, ever.

Yeah my Dad had one of the first Motorola Brick phones and people use to look at him when he talked on at first he thought it was color since he looked like a big shot, but eventually stop since it was rude to be talking on a phone and not to the people around him. Even today, you see more and more of back lash against people talking on their cells in public place. Many mass transit system now have no cell phone cars, and if you pull your phone out when it rings you get nasty looks from people. These no cell phone zone are growing and even when you are allow to use them it becomes difficult since everyone around you is also talking.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post


I use Siri, successfully, all the time while sitting in my chair, the TV blaring, the grandkids fuss in'...

It is amazing how well the noise-cancelling mics/software work on the later iDevices.

 

Why were you not talking to your grand-kids, yeah the technology works but now your grand-kids think you care more about the phone than them. The is the social failure of technologies.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by wakefinance View Post
 

 

I don't understand why giving instructions to your phone is any different than having a phone call.  You're talking into the mic in both use cases.  Speakerphone conversations are especially analogous (but I think speakerphone calls in public are obnoxious).  You'll warm up to it eventually.

 

As far as anyone being able to command your system, I don't think that would be allowed.  The Moto X "takes a fingerprint" of your voice so that only you can give it commands.  The same technology will make its way to other companies.

 

 

Because people accept you having a conversation with another human that is normal, and understand doing so over phone whether a cell or land line is acceptable, but talks to objects is socially seen as weird. People may not say anything to you but their subconscious if forming opinions about you and your behavior. I had to stop my kids from texting all the time, especially at the diner table. They did not think anything was wrong with it until their friends began saying things about them texting while having a face to face conversation. People do not want to be around people who randomly talk to things, it seen as being crazy, and people when they talk to you they do not want you playing with something or having another conversation with someone else.

post #34 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maestro64 View Post
 

Why were you not talking to your grand-kids, yeah the technology works but now your grand-kids think you care more about the phone than them. The is the social failure of technologies.

There is a world of difference in having a protracted conversation with another person on a mobile phone, and firing off a "Play my party mix playlist" to Siri.  Voice commands taking the place of things that would distract you anyway (while you fumbled with a remote control) are not socially exclusionary.  You're overplaying this, and it's more than a bit rude to suggest that a guy using Siri (once? twice? unknown) was neglecting his grandkids.

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post #35 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crowley View Post

Don't see why we can't set our own keyword.  If I want to shout "hey buttwad" to activate Siri, that's my choice.
Think what that could mean for sex. One partner could shout, "I'm coming!" and turn up the volume on Ravel's Bolero.

I admit to being a Fanatical Moderate. I Disdain the Inane. Vyizderzominymororzizazizdenderizorziz?

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post #36 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kibitzer View Post

"I'm coming!" and turn up the volume on Ravel's Bolero.

Hehe.

Or have Siri search the web for you.
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post #37 of 46
Dave: Hello, Siri. Do you read me, Siri?
Siri: Affirmative, Dave. I read you.
Dave: Open the doors, Siri.
Siri: I'm sorry, Dave. I'm afraid I can't do that!
post #38 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by jakeb View Post

I partially feel this way, but let me tell you... after a weeklong road trip this summer, using Siri in the car... it was awkward at first, but by the third day, I had no trouble talking to Siri and asking for directions, sending text messages, looking up the nearest gas station. It didn't take long to make it feel completely natural. These shifts can happen so quickly. 
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Agree. I think the idea of a cumbersome dock in the home is a 'meh' idea but in the car... brilliant!
post #39 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post

Hehe.

Or have Siri search the web for you.

Here's a cool video on 50 things Siri can do. How many did you already know about?
There's also a matching video from the same source on 50 things Google Voice can do.
They're not meant to be used to compare the two by the way. They're somewhat different from each other in reality.
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post #40 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post

Hehe.

Or have Siri search the web for you.

Here's a cool video on 50 things Siri can do. How many did you already know about?

They're not meant to be used to compare the two by the way. They're somewhat different from each other in reality.

I felt like a sugar cube after #32, but knew the iPhone was able to do these. The Google version I turned off during the first answer; whassup with that voice?

Thanks. Never knew the YouTube vids do fit, width wise, in the thread.
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