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Review: FiftyThree's Pencil Bluetooth stylus

post #1 of 38
Thread Starter 
Development studio FiftyThree takes a bold step into the hardware game with its Bluetooth-enabled stylus designed to be a companion tool for the company's popular drawing app Paper.

Pencil


Pencil enters an already crowded aftermarket stylus market, one that has seen a boom in recent years thanks to a rapid shift toward tablets. While Apple's multitouch-enabled iPad is largely to thank for the dramatic change in personal computing preference, some users prefer to use a tactile tool to manipulate iOS and its apps.

Current styli from big-name manufacturers with years of tablet-and-stylus experience, like Wacom, offer functionality that covers a wide gamut of niche users. New players like Ten One Design are also bringing innovative products to market, such as the Pogo Connect, a pressure-sensitive Bluetooth stylus with support for a variety of tips.

Pencil is definitely not the first to incorporate a digital eraser (Samsung's Wacom-powered S Pen is a good example of a widely distributed model), but existing systems are largely bespoke products made specifically for customized hardware.

The competition is imposing, but FiftyThree has incorporated some solid features into a design we think many users will likely find appealing.

Design



In designing Pencil, FiftyThree chose to mimic a carpenter pencil, a writing tool that many potential customers have either used or are familiar with. Until now, most styli have taken on thin form factors dating back to some of the first examples designed to fit into PDA bodies. Even current models like Wacom's Bamboo Stylus or the Pogo Connect have shapes that may feel foreign to someone picking one up for the first time.

Pencil


Anyone who has used a carpenter pencil and found its shape comfortable will be pleased with Pencil. The opposite is also true, however, as we know a few people who simply can't use a squared-off writing utensil without cramping up. Deciding to use a well-known shape may be an obvious one, but on some levels -- perhaps subconsciously -- it requires Pencil operate in the same manner as its non-digital wood-and-graphite forebear.

Pencil feels good in the hand, with a nice weight that lends to a sturdy feel. Inside is a metal frame that serves as an attachment point for the integrated Bluetooth module and removable battery, while affording rock solid stability.

Carpenter pencils don't usually come with an eraser, but FiftyThree opted to build one in to its version of the tool. The feature is one of Pencil's major selling points and one that sets it apart from other standalone iPad accessories.

Pencil


There are no buttons or switches to activate the stylus and thanks to Bluetooth LE, Pencil can keep a charge for a claimed one month. During our short time with the unit, we saw no issues with power or power management.

One downside to keeping all electronic circuitry hidden is that the user has no easy way to check battery status at a glance. FiftyThree could one day add an in-app indicator, though for now users will have to estimate when to charge Pencil or let it run down completely.

As for charging, the soft drawing tip is attached to an input sensor, which is in turn connected to a battery pack with integrated USB connector. To charge, the battery pulls out of Pencil's frame and can be plugged it into any USB port. A single LED indicated with a lightning bolt symbol will change from amber to green when the pack is fully juiced.

Pencil


This unique removable battery design also allows for Pencil's Bluetooth LE module to live in the end opposite the drawing tip, offering better weight distribution. When inserted, the battery's USB connector interfaces with contacts located at the base of the rear circuit board, sending power as well as data from the drawing tip sensor to the communications module.

Pencil


Finally, drawing more inspiration from a carpenter's pencil, Pencil can be had in either "Walnut" or "Graphite." As its name implies, Walnut is milled from a single piece of walnut wood, while the less expensive Graphite model is sheathed in a brushed aluminum body with faux wood grain finish. The wooden version has a built-in magnet for easy attachment to metallic objects, like an iPad Smart Cover.

In use



While Pencil can be used as a regular capacitive stylus on any touchscreen device, its eraser function is currently limited to Paper. This implementation, combined with a lack of physical controls, means the stylus only needs to pair with an iPad when Paper is being used.

Instead of discovering Pencil from the Settings menu as you would most other Bluetooth accessories, users touch and hold on a new icon in the app's tool palette. FiftyThree calls the process "Kiss to Pair."

Pencil


In our tests, we had no problems syncing, though it was a bit bothersome to re-pair whenever we left our iPad sitting for more than a few minutes.

Once paired, however, Pencil's performance was impressive. The tip is just squishy enough to offer a proper amount of draw resistance, yet not to the point where touches felt inaccurate. The balance in firmness is not perfect, though we prefer a softer tip as it allows for a tactile feel that more closely imitates traditional paper and pencil use.

Pencil


Before trying out Pencil, we were concerned that the draw/erase sensors would cause problems with the app's interface. Paper's graphics engine draws thick and thin lines based on stroke speed rather than pressure, meaning a quick response to detected input is essential to the drawing experience. In practice, we found Pencil operates with little to no lag even when cross-hatching or drawing long, flowing lines.

Pencil uses Bluetooth to tell an iPad which tip is touching its screen. If neither the nib sensor or eraser sensor are sending a signal, Paper assumes input is coming from a user's finger and initiates a "blend" mode that simulates smudging colors together. When Pencil is powered on and connected, the app enables its palm rejection technology, which allows users to rest their hand on the screen while drawing.

Pencil


The process FiftyThree employes to achieve this level of intelligent input is quite clever. Instead of relying on sensor output data alone, Pencil and Paper work together to determine a user's intentions. In order to register a draw or erase input, Pencil's sensors must be activated at the same time -- or more specifically within a time threshold -- that a touch event is logged on the iPad.

For example, if we were to lift Pencil away from the display, touch the screen with our finger and accidentally reactivate the drawing tip sensor, Paper would recognize the action as a smudge, not a line. This helps keep errant touches to a minimum, allows for fast mode switching and plays a crucial role in palm rejection.

Pencil


After a few sessions, we started using the Paper and Pencil combo as if it were a real paper and pencil; quickly moving between draw, erase and blend modes. There is something to be said for a digital tool that so closely mimics the functionality of its "real world" counterpart that it can simply be picked up and used.

Of course, Pencil has room for improvement. We found blend mode to be somewhat imprecise as the virtual brush size did not take the size of our finger into account. Like other tools in the Paper palette, sizes are preset and adjusted based on magnitudes of motion rather than precise touchscreen data.

Also, with Pencil's Bluetooth capabilities, we would have appreciated support for pressure sensitive input. FiftyThree has said Paper's current form of dynamic brush sizing eliminates the need for such tech, though we miss the transparent and precise control offered by setups like the Pogo Connect and Procreate.

Conclusion



FiftyThree has a unique product in Pencil and gets a lot of things right where others have been left wanting. The digital eraser is a great concept, especially for iPad users not accustomed to styli or artists who are looking for a more traditional workflow. Nib feel is great and build quality is extremely high.

Pencil


Most of these attributes are worthless if you don't happen to like the Paper app, however. While we feel its shape and design make Pencil one of the best iPad styluses around, using it in "passive mode" outside of Paper puts the tool's most compelling features to waste.

Ultimately, in assigning a score we chose to evaluate Pencil's merits and shortcomings as they apply to its intended purpose, which is an accessory to the Paper ecosystem. As such, it comes highly recommended, though we do point out issues in the "Pros and Cons" section that are applicable to general consumers.

Pencil is being sold exclusively through FiftyThree's online store and comes in at $50 for the Graphite version and $60 for Walnut. Every Pencil also unlocks all of Paper's optional brushes and color mixer tool, which are normally sold as in-app purchases priced at $1.99 each or $6.99 for the entire set.

Score: 4 out of 5



ratings_hl_40.png

Pros:


  • Excellent build quality and design
  • Digital Eraser (with Paper app)
  • Long battery life


Cons:


  • Operative features limited to Paper app
  • Shape may uncomfortable for some
  • Not pressure sensitive
post #2 of 38
If you go on 53's forum, there are quite a few users requesting pressure sensing for this stylus, or support for Wacom's pressure sensitive alternative. But one of their engineers has consistently replied that neither option will be available soon. Too bad.
post #3 of 38
Thanks for the review.

I'm guessing that it isn't pressure sensitive because the Paper app hasn't been designed to be pressure sensitive and would require some serious re-working to change its drawing maths.
post #4 of 38
That is really cool software at work there.
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post #5 of 38

Unfortunately it is available only in the US and Canada, and only online. I wish it was available elsewhere (or at least at Apple Stores in the US). I imagine they would sell a lot! I contacted them (I am in Switzerland) and asked if it was available at brick and mortar stores and the answer was no. But I'm headed to NYC, maybe I could figure out something in the week I'll spend there. As an architect I can say that the request for such a tool is incredible. I feel we are among the prime targets of such a product (judging from the requests I got from my colleagues for "If you find one, buy one for me too" I think the market is really big).

 

Well designed, well crafted and well implemented software wise. It only works with the paper app? For the time being, I think. But future apps might come along that license the tech. Anyway, the Paper app is really good, so there's no particular need for it to work with other apps (my opinion). As long as the ecosystem works. I prefer products that work perfectly doing one thing really well, than half assed solutions (but then again, this might explain why I own Apple products in the first place)

post #6 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by RichL View Post

Thanks for the review.

I'm guessing that it isn't pressure sensitive because the Paper app hasn't been designed to be pressure sensitive and would require some serious re-working to change its drawing maths.

Unfortunately... and not to be harsh... but you're guessing wrong, because Wacom owns a whole bag of patents related to pressure sensitivity.

Which is most likely the reason that pressure sensitive stylii (stylases) are hard to come by.
Samsung licenses their PS tech from Wacom.
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post #7 of 38
Over priced junk. The goddamn tablet stylus business is a rip off.
I can buy a dozen, medium tipped Parker brother pens for literally a few bucks. Awesome pens! But a freaking stylus even in TJ Maxx is costing $9. Kiss my.....
post #8 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by maccherry View Post

Kiss my.....

Pensil tip?
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post #9 of 38
What's up with all this pap reporting from AI these past few days!?

There is a lot of serious Apple (and tech) news floating around, and all you can come up with is product placements?
post #10 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

What's up with all this pap reporting from AI these past few days!?

There is a lot of serious Apple (and tech) news floating around, and all you can come up with is product placements?

Yes. By all means, AI should only cover things that YOU are interested in.
post #11 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by GQB View Post


Yes. By all means, AI should only cover things that YOU are interested in.

Did you learn something from this review that you did not from, say, cnet.com?
post #12 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThePixelDoc View Post

Unfortunately... and not to be harsh... but you're guessing wrong, because Wacom owns a whole bag of patents related to pressure sensitivity.

Which is most likely the reason that pressure sensitive stylii (stylases) are hard to come by.
Samsung licenses their PS tech from Wacom.

Wow, Samsung didn't just copy it from Wacom, there's a first!
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post #13 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post

Wow, Samsung didn't just copy it from Wacom, there's a first!

The pen, mightier than Xeroxing.
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post #14 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

What's up with all this pap reporting from AI these past few days!?

There is a lot of serious Apple (and tech) news floating around, and all you can come up with is product placements?

I guess this does belong in the Review section. Having said that, when you hit 2011 products on the second page of the reviews I have to wonder how seriously AI take that section.
Edited by digitalclips - 12/9/13 at 7:22am
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post #15 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post

The pen, mightier than Xeroxing.

LOL
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post #16 of 38
Anybody used ZoomNotes ? And Adonit Jot Script stylus?
post #17 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post


Did you learn something from this review that you did not from, say, cnet.com?

 

Yes. I don't spend time there. I have limited time to divert from my job as a software developer. So I focus on areas that interest me (Apple, the sun, Icelandic volcanoes, thedailywtf) to the exclusion of nearly all (digital) 'trade rags'. The exception being when I actively seek information on a particular item that I'd like to purchase/use/understand.

 

Having reviews here allows me to note it, skip or read.

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post #18 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThePixelDoc View Post


Unfortunately... and not to be harsh... but you're guessing wrong, because Wacom owns a whole bag of patents related to pressure sensitivity.

 

You know, you are probably *both right*, given that the patent scenario is likely correct (I'm sure they have the most, probably not all, and don't forget that patents show methods of achieving an end result, not the end result, so they don't own the patent on pressure sensitivity, just the best methods to achieve it), and the fact that the app is certainly written using speed of touch/movement algorithms and would also need a rewrite to adopt a new input paradigm.

post #19 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post

That is really cool software at work there.

That music is horrible though.  And it's too bad the person doing the demo isn't an artist (or doesn't appear to be).  Handy demo in any case though.  Thanks for sharing.

post #20 of 38

So it uses a battery and electronics to power an Eraser?

 

Because really you don't get anything else of note.  It doesn't have pressure sensitivity, it isn't more accurate because it is still using capacitance to capture strokes. 

 

It seems utterly pointless to me.

post #21 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by malax View Post
 

That music is horrible though.  And it's too bad the person doing the demo isn't an artist (or doesn't appear to be).  Handy demo in any case though.  Thanks for sharing.


Interesting that MOST demos of art and photography products (or their art and photography aspects at least) seem to be (frustratingly) made by non-artists and non-photographers....  ...some kind of "law" involved??

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post #22 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post


Wow, Samsung didn't just copy it from Wacom, there's a first!

 

Pity. Samsung could have, and their fans would have attacked Wacom if Wacon dared to sue Samsung over any patents with "LOL@WACOM" pictures to showing prior art of Sumerians using styluses in 3500 B.C.

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post #23 of 38

Nice review. Just ordered one. Because I support FiftyThree's pro-iPad disposition.

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post #24 of 38

I don't have any opinion about this device because I do not own one, nor have I ever tested one.  Hmmm.  Seems like many of the opinionated commenters may be in the same position.  

 

I mention this interesting thought because I was hoping for  report by people who had actually used the product.

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post #25 of 38
I ordered a Pencil because I'm still on my quest for a good replacement for a paper/pen notepad. I have a SmartPen but hate the requirement for special paper. I have a Pogo Connect but don't think it feels as natural as a pen, plus I never found an app that really handles palm rejection effectively. We'll see how this one goes...

Without an active digitizer, the iPad really struggles with having the pieces in place to work effectively with a stylus. It's the only feature on the Surface Pro that I really jones for.
post #26 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Snowdog65 View Post

So it uses a battery and electronics to power an Eraser?

Because really you don't get anything else of note.  It doesn't have pressure sensitivity, it isn't more accurate because it is still using capacitance to capture strokes. 

It seems utterly pointless to me.

I haven't drawn with my fingers since I was 4. This seems more like what I'm used to for making art. If it's nothing but a better capacitive stylus, I'm happy.

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post #27 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by maccherry View Post

Over priced junk. The goddamn tablet stylus business is a rip off.
I can buy a dozen, medium tipped Parker brother pens for literally a few bucks. Awesome pens! But a freaking stylus even in TJ Maxx is costing $9. Kiss my.....

Ignorant comment. You clearly don't know one stylus from another.

post #28 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sky King View Post
 

I don't have any opinion about this device because I do not own one, nor have I ever tested one.  Hmmm.  Seems like many of the opinionated commenters may be in the same position.  

 

I mention this interesting thought because I was hoping for  report by people who had actually used the product.

Wait a while first. This thing was launched quite recently.

post #29 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cyberzombie View Post
 

 

Yes. I don't spend time there. I have limited time to divert from my job as a software developer. So I focus on areas that interest me (Apple, the sun, Icelandic volcanoes, thedailywtf) to the exclusion of nearly all (digital) 'trade rags'. The exception being when I actively seek information on a particular item that I'd like to purchase/use/understand.

 

Having reviews here allows me to note it, skip or read.

Good for you. Clearly, some people have not figured out that if you don't like an article, you don't have to read it. Furthermore, you don't have to take more time out of your life to first read it and then criticize it. OTOH, they may be secretly thankful for articles they allegedly don't like because it gives them a chance to do the one thing they are good at - gripe.

post #30 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by iMat View Post
 

Unfortunately it is available only in the US and Canada, and only online. I wish it was available elsewhere (or at least at Apple Stores in the US). I imagine they would sell a lot! I contacted them (I am in Switzerland) and asked if it was available at brick and mortar stores and the answer was no. But I'm headed to NYC, maybe I could figure out something in the week I'll spend there. As an architect I can say that the request for such a tool is incredible. I feel we are among the prime targets of such a product (judging from the requests I got from my colleagues for "If you find one, buy one for me too" I think the market is really big).

 

Well designed, well crafted and well implemented software wise. It only works with the paper app? For the time being, I think. But future apps might come along that license the tech. Anyway, the Paper app is really good, so there's no particular need for it to work with other apps (my opinion). As long as the ecosystem works. I prefer products that work perfectly doing one thing really well, than half assed solutions (but then again, this might explain why I own Apple products in the first place)

If you want, I will buy a bunch and send them to you to sell in Europe. You'll have to prepay me first, of course. :)

 

But seriously, why would architects need a stylus specifically made for Paper? 

post #31 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by stelligent View Post
 

If you want, I will buy a bunch and send them to you to sell in Europe. You'll have to prepay me first, of course. :)

 

But seriously, why would architects need a stylus specifically made for Paper? 

 

I am in touch with them, stock has almost been sold out. They told me to let them know prior to departure or upon arrival and see whether it might be possible to get hold of 4 of them.

 

As to why.

Well, I am not talking about "all" architects, but in our office the ability to create quick drawings in an easy manner is very important (think about constructive details or generally "idea drawing"). The use of a thin stylus (by thin I mean the stylus itself, not the line it draws) conveys less of a feeling and allows less precise drawing. It might seem counterintuitive, but a stylus with some weight is the best to draw straight lines and sketch an idea.

And using a digital device allows for easier archiving, sharing (to the design team for instance) compared to paper.


Architecture is still made of "pencil and paper" especially in the early drawing phases. There's know way you can freely design ideas on a computer with a drawing software.

Imagine this: you are on the go, somewhere in a city, and you see a building that inspires you in some lines. You'd sit down, draw the perspective that interests you and then you have it. You can share it with the office, archive it, print it or do whatever you want.

 

Now you are at a construction site, you have to explain to a worker how to build something. You can quickly draw it on the iPad (usually you would use the same "pencil" as the one that inspired the designers of 53 and draw it on a wood board or on a wall or a piece of paper) and then keep it for future reference when the building is complete.

 

Other use: you are in a meeting, try to explain something to a client. Of course you could use paper, then photocopy it or scan it and hand it to the client or sen via email. With this system you can draw it on the iPad and send it right away, archive it and send it to the design team.

Besides saving countless trees, you'd also have a much smoother information flow and a better organization of the drawings "from paper to computer". With AirPlay you can even project the design on a TV in the meeting room, hassle free, for everyone to see. Immediately

 

Size and weight of this pencil seem perfect (I don't own one, but this review suggests it is so) for sketching, creating. Architect have in their pencils one of the few "manual" tools left today. And they keep it almost as a sacred item. This is almost the only thing that still make architecture design a manual process. Digitalizing it with so little compromises as 53's idea seem to imply, is a big step forward.

 

Hope I gave you my take on this idea and why it is interesting for architects. Are there alternatives? Yes. Is it perfect? No. Is it "needed"? Nope.

But it is nevertheless a great idea. Especially on the go, where a Wacom tablet is of no use because you cannot see the result.

 

In our office there are 4 architects who asked me to buy one. So, all in all, it would make 5 sold.

 

:-)

 

(Edit: added the AirPlay use)

post #32 of 38
@iMat - just curious...

1) How is it hat you're first discovering styluses for the iPad now?

2) What is it that you think you will specifically like for your jobs as architects with the 53, that isn't available in say, the Jot Script Fine Point from Adonis or the Wacom Bamboo?

Only curious... and no... I have no affiliation whatsoever with Adonis or Wacom.
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post #33 of 38
So only one model has a magnet?
Too expensive IMHO without pressure sensitivity included.
post #34 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThePixelDoc View Post

@iMat - just curious...

1) How is it hat you're first discovering styluses for the iPad now?
I have discovered styli quite some time ago. And considered many alternatives.

2) What is it that you think you will specifically like for your jobs as architects with the 53, that isn't available in say, the Jot Script Fine Point from Adonis or the Wacom Bamboo?
It depends what you are shopping for. Are you looking for a technical design pen, with many features, then maybe some of the mentioned alternatives might be perfect. But if you are looking for something to draw ideas, then the size and the overall feel is important, whereas some other features are less so.

That is the reason why some people buy a Bic roller, others buy a Pentel, others buy a Mont Blanc and so on. Why should i buy a Faber Castell when I can get 20 of them for less money at my local supermarket?

As it happens with everything, some people value things a little differently than others. To me, design aside, the "feel" of a writing instrument is important. Does it feel solid, can i grab it and just freely draw a line? Well, that's what I am looking for. It is quite hard to explain in words, especially as english is not even my language.
Is the glass trackpad better than a plastic one? They perform the same function, are more or less the same precision, and the glass one costs a lot more.
But they "feel" completely different. Apple as a company spends hours on these things, as an architect i try to do the same. Why shouldn't the feel of a pen be important? Why shouldn't I value its design and overall feeling the same as I do the function?


As I said before, it is not perfect, by no means. But to me, personally, it represents the best solution for drawing and creating on the go. I don't need millimetrical precision, but I cherish a solid object, one that I can draw "strong lines" with.

If form follows function, then not all drawings on tablet are created equal (a diagram is different than a perspective), so why should all pens be equal?


 

Only curious... and no... I have no affiliation whatsoever with Adonis or Wacom.

neither do I with 53 or any other company. I hope I provided some more insight as to why I will purchase the Pen. It was an interesting thing to do. Explaining why the pen is important to an architect is always nice. I know, half of you might consider architects crazy, and you are probably right :-) But the pen really is a "totem" of some sorts.
post #35 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by iMat View Post

neither do I with 53 or any other company. I hope I provided some more insight as to why I will purchase the Pen. It was an interesting thing to do. Explaining why the pen is important to an architect is always nice. I know, half of you might consider architects crazy, and you are probably right :-) But the pen really is a "totem" of some sorts.
Funny enough, I'm 8 credits and a board exam short of a degree in architecture... from almost 30 years ago. I've written here many times that Apple changed my life, well it also caused me to skip my last semester, which I never found the time... and to be quite honest the need... to go back to (don't tell my nephew!).

Since I was specializing primarily in architectural conceptualization, I was working 2 part time jobs as a photographer's assistant and in a print shop as a graphic designer. The photographer needed a computer to create a database of his photos/negatives, and the printer was naturally curious about that new thing called "desktop publishing" to possibly bring down his imagesetting costs and flexibility.

There was only one computer to consider at the time to "catch 2 cats with one mouse": an Apple Macintosh, Summer '85.

Gut instinct on my part and a huge leap of faith from my employers in my ability to make it work, paid off for them and for me for the last 30 years. No need to look back. I love architecture to this day, and still use it and many of it's star designers as inspiration for graphics work. Naturally getting in on the ground floor of computer tech and realizing another of my childhood interests in electronics; and combining it with all of my creative interests such as photography, printing, etc... well what can I say: the Mac gave me a chance to realize all of my dreams and interests in one small package. It just all came together thru luck and being in the right place at the right time. That's why I rarely recount me story... and never to young people, because an education and a degree in anything is a must AFAIC(!)

Back to the present: I was curious mainly as to what you saw in the 53 as opposed to the others, because I have worked and lived with an Xacto or Rapido in my hand or at my side for a few decades now. Even though I have used carpenter pencils, I prefer the slim, light and well balanced in the hand... when considering writing/drawing instruments. Since these are "traditional factors" and common instruments for architects... it was why I questioned your and your team's particular choice. Also I thought it helpful pointing to a device that *I* might consider if I wanted a stylus for my iPad.

It would be interesting to hear your collective responses once you've had a chance to use the 53's for a while... so if ya think about it, be sure to come back to the thread here and comment.

1rolleyes.gif.. I'm such a hopeless Fanboy, I'm starting to get worried about myself!
Knowing what you are talking about would help you understand why you are so wrong. By "Realistic" - AI Forum Member
Reply
Knowing what you are talking about would help you understand why you are so wrong. By "Realistic" - AI Forum Member
Reply
post #36 of 38
There is most definitely a way to check the battery status. Hit the 53 logo on the main page of Paper and then go to Pencil.
post #37 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

What's up with all this pap reporting from AI these past few days!?

There is a lot of serious Apple (and tech) news floating around, and all you can come up with is product placements?

No one forced you to read it
post #38 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by charlituna View Post


No one forced you to read it

I guess you missed the point of the post.

What else is new.
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