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Apple's new Mac Pro a better value than the sum of its parts

post #1 of 130
Thread Starter 
The first indication that Apple's sleek, cylindrical Mac Pro is meant for professionals --?other than its name --?is its high cost. AppleInsider assembled a comparable Windows-based system to see just how much value Apple squeezed into its new desktop.

Pro Parts


For the purposes of this exercise, we used current prices at a large, nationwide internet retailer well respected by do-it-yourself PC builders. We targeted the new Mac Pro's most tricked-out arrangement, a $9,599 configuration:

  • 2.7GHz 12-core Intel Xeon E5 with 30MB of L3 cache

  • 64GB (4x16GB) of 1866MHz DDR3 ECC

  • 1TB PCIe-based flash storage

  • Dual AMD FirePro D700 GPUs with 6GB of GDDR5 VRAM each


Mac Pro PC


To house the machine, we chose one of the highest-rated ATX-compatible cases available, Lian Li's stalwart PC-7B for $89.99. Lian Li's minimalist brushed aluminum towers have been staples of the build-it-yourself community for years and are about as close as the PC aftermarket gets to Apple's design aesthetic.

The PC-7B is a barebones chassis and does not come bundled with a power supply, so we added Corsair's CMPSU-650TX 650-watt CrossFire-ready unit for another $89.99. The 650TX provides enough juice to run both of the power-hungry GPUs as well as Intel's latest and greatest.

Driving the displays in our hypothetical rig are two AMD FirePro W9000 GPUs at $3,399.99 each. They match the Mac Pro's cards on spec with 6GB of GDDR5 memory and 264Gbps memory bandwidth, though it is difficult to say exactly how well they mimic Apple's heavily customized units.

The two AMD FirePro cards alone cost nearly $7,000 when purchased at retailWhen it comes to the CPU, we can duplicate the Mac Pro precisely. Intel's Xeon E5-2697 Ivy Bridge chip is at the heart of Apple's new professional desktop, and the processor's 12 22-nanometer processing cores hit our shopping cart at $2,749.99.

Storage is one area where Apple has a leg up on the do-it-yourself crowd, as the handful of PCI Express-based drives on the market command astronomical prices. OCZ's soon-to-be-discontinued RevoDrive 3 X2 series is the current king of the hill and a 960 gigabyte model would set us back approximately $3,000 --?if we could actually find one for sale.

We turned to Kingston Technology for their 16-gigabyte, ECC-registered DDR3 1866 RAM modules. At $209.99 each, the 64 gigabytes required to reach parity with the Mac Pro's configuration costs us $839.96.

Memory


To tie the beast together, our motherboard needs to sport a Xeon-compatible LGA 2011 socket, support for 1866MHz DDR3 RAM, and enough PCI Express slots for the two video cards and our solid state storage. We went with Asus's Z9PE-D8 board, which also brings USB 3.0 and FireWire connectivity for $539.99. We would have chosen one of Asus's Thunderbolt-equipped offerings, but the company does not make Xeon-compatible versions of those boards.

Since a computer is just a toaster without its operating system, we added a Windows 8.1 Pro license that set us back $199.99.

Without considering shipping costs, assembly time, or additional complications that may arise from cooling the machine, it would cost just over $14,300 to replicate Apple's new Mac Pro spec-for-spec.

For that substantial premium, we lose several of the Mac Pro's tentpole features?--?notably Thunderbolt connectivity --?and increase the computer's size by nearly 300 percent. We would also forfeit the significant intangible addition of Apple's AppleCare warranty service.

All in all, it appears that the new Mac Pro's startling sticker price belies the exceptional value underneath.
post #2 of 130
Those graphics cards are staggeringly expensive!
post #3 of 130
"It's all in the software" (Steve Jobs at AllThingsD)

edit to look up the case (strange AI didn't include it):



If this is the closest in Windows-land to a Mac I now understand why there are so many switchers.
Edited by PhilBoogie - 12/24/13 at 9:31am
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post #4 of 130
where's DED to point out that the "Total" column for the "Storage" row doesn't include the cents positions and thus it must be an error in <whatever spreadsheet application was used to create the thing>?
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post #5 of 130
Oh... You're gonna get some guy living in momma's basement that will tell you they can build one using cheap PC parts that will run rings around the Mac Pro for $699.

As soon as that guy is finished callousing his right hand, he'll tell us his "secret".
post #6 of 130
But the Windoze crowd says they can build something better for 1/4 the price. Just check out cnet's review. 1wink.gif
post #7 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post

"It's all in the software" (Steve Jobs at AllThingsD)
 

True, but having some specialized hardware doesn't hurt!

post #8 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Since a computer is just a toaster without its operating system, we added a Windows 8.1 Pro license that set us back $199.99.

Congratulations: now you have a broken toaster. 1wink.gif

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post #9 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Storage is one area where Apple has a leg up on the do-it-yourself crowd, as the handful of PCI Express-based drives on the market command astronomical prices. OCZ's soon-to-be-discontinued RevoDrive 3 X2 series is the current king of the hill and a 960 gigabyte model would set us back approximately $3,000 --?if we could actually find one for sale.

OWC sells a 960Gb PCIe SSD for $1,199

And I'm sure this $14k machine price will drop considerably if they could also just order the GPU chips instead of the whole card. Never mind configuring the bare bone $2,999 model.
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post #10 of 130
Now we need the White Knights to charge in: the people who secretly have NO intention of owning a pro workstation themselves--much less attaching multiple external enclosures to it--but who rush in bravely to save real pros from themselves, and warn them of how "messy" it will look to have an "overpriced" 6-inch cylinder standing next to a non-cylindrical PCI box, all of which together is still smaller, quieter and more flexible than the old towers--which had plenty of external stuff hooked to them anyway.

We thank them for their service. For every pro workstation user there must be 10 White Knights ready to save the world one forum at a time 1smile.gif

1tongue.gif
post #11 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post

But the Windoze crowd says they can build something better for 1/4 the price. Just check out cnet's review. 1wink.gif

Sure. Just use Intel's integrated video. Just as good as dual FirePros. Also, use slower SATA SSDs. Also, use an unlocked Core i7 and overclock the snot out of it, that should make up for the lack of cores. Besides, Call of Duty can't use that many cores anyway, so you don't need the extra cores to win the benchmark. And it's all about the benchmarks. Add a custom water cooling system, some red neon lights from an old Honda Civic, a "Got NOS?" decal on the case, and your mad gamer box is ready to beat the Mac Pro!

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post #12 of 130
A couple of things:

1. While Apple is certainly charging a reasonable price for the Mac Pro, given what they owe the OEMs for the GPUs and the CPU, choosing that particular OCZ drive is a little strange. Besides it's intangible actual cost and low availability, there are other SSDs with a similar capacity and speed to the Apple SSD for $1000-1200 from NewEgg, which is obviously the retailer you are using.

2. The Windows (and Hackintosh) crowd could build a system that is theoretically close in spec to this machine for thousands less if they forego the workstation graphics cards, which are sold with enormous margins to business users to support them, and so they can make a profit after the razor thin margins of their gaming GPU lineups - many of which have just has much horsepower as the FirePro/Quadro cards, but without the proprietary OpenGL firmware that locks those cards out of using AutoCAD and other such programs.

3. OK, three things. I did an apples-to-apples comparison using the baseline (4-core) system, again getting FirePro GPUs, and when it was all put together, the cost was 200-400 shy of the Mac Pro, depending on how fancy a case you wanted to use. Of course, this leaves out the fact that Windows comes with very little software to do anything useful, and the fact that Apple is selling their professional media creation programs at a fraction of the cost of anything comparable for the Windows platform to do the same thing.

All that being said, I agree, for the power user, Apple's new professional system is, for the most part, a clear-cut better value.
Edited by nathanimal - 12/24/13 at 10:37am
post #13 of 130
I think the bottleneck at the high-end sort of deflates how awesome these workstations are. What I mean is... 10 years ago, each new generation of Intel processor or video card was often orders of magnitude faster than the previous. Now, we are at a point where we scoff at a 20% increase in performance - in which that 20% itself is 1000x the power of a 5 year old system.

There isn't a point in arguing this... for something this small, with this much power - is just incredible. OS aside - this really is a work of engineering art. It's about time Apple turned their brains to the Pro market... it is what kept Apple alive and still is the grassroots of the brand.
post #14 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by nathanimal View Post

2. The Windows (and Hackintosh) crowd could build a system that is theoretically close in spec to this machine for thousands less if they forego the workstation graphics cards
 

 

If you do an Apples-to-oranges comparison, the oranges always win.

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post #15 of 130
Quote:
For $2,999, the base price of the Mac Pro, you get a quad-core 3.7GHz Intel Xeon E5 processor, 12GB of RAM, two AMD FirePro D300 graphics processors, and a 256GB solid-state drive. But that’s only the beginning: our review unit has an eight-core, 3GHz processor, along with 64GB of RAM, a 1TB drive, and FirePro D700 GPUs. That’s $8,099 of Mac Pro kit, and a couple of other small upgrades will run you right up near $10,000. Throw in the 32-inch Sharp 4K monitor that Apple recommends, and spending $12,000 or more isn’t hard to do. Our review unit, screen included, costs $11,812.

JL: I worked on the Mac Pro as an editor. We shot some test footage on a RED Epic at 4096 x 2160, copied the contents of the card to the Mac Pro's local storage, and imported that directly into both Final Cut Pro 10.1 and Premiere Pro CC without transcoding.

The Verge is a Premiere house. (Once Final Cut Pro 7 was discontinued, FCP X didn't look like it was going to satisfy our needs.) However, since FCP X was specifically optimized for the new Mac Pro, we tested our RED footage with the app and it handled native footage from the Epic shockingly well. For this test, I turned off auto-render and set the playback quality to "better performance." I was able to layer four streams, resized and composed on top of each other with color correction on each clip, and FCP X played the composite back without stuttering or dropping frames.

Final Cut may have been adjusting the quality of the playback to something less than native 4K, but the frame rate stayed solid, and in the resized preview window I wasn't distracted by any downscaling. I saw the same smooth performance on other clips with more intensive filtering and transitions. If you enjoy using FCP X (which I truly, truly don't), the Mac Pro is a fantastically responsive machine to edit on.

http://www.theverge.com/2013/12/23/5234574/apple-mac-pro-review-2013


It appears that Final Cut Pro X was built to exploit the capabilities of hardware like the new Mac Pro... and vice versa.
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post #16 of 130
It's not just AI, others have confirmed this result. It's pretty amazing. Of course Apple gets those components at a reduced price, but what's important is the end result for the user. And all this with a PC built in the US! I don't know how they did it.
post #17 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by nathanimal View Post

A couple of things:

1. While Apple is certainly charging a reasonable price for the Mac Pro, given what they owe the OEMs for the GPUs and the CPU, choosing that particular OCZ drive is a little strange. Besides it's intangible actual cost and low availability, there are other SSDs with a similar capacity and speed to the Apple SSD for $1000-1200 from NewEgg, which is obviously the retailer you are using.

2. The Windows (and Hackintosh) crowd could build a system that is theoretically close in spec to this machine for thousands less if they forego the workstation graphics cards, which are sold with enormous margins to business users to support them, and so they can make a profit after the razor thin margins of their gaming GPU lineups - many of which have just has much horsepower as the FirePro/Quadro cards, but without the proprietary OpenGL firmware that locks those cards out of using AutoCAD and other such programs.

3. OK, three things. I did a apples-to-apples comparison using the baseline (4-core) system, again getting FirePro GPUs, and when it was all put together, the cost was 200-400 shy of the Mac Pro, depending on how fancy a case you wanted to use. Of course, this leaves out the fact that Windows comes with very little software to do anything useful, and the fact that Apple is selling their professional media creation programs at a fraction of the cost of anything comparable for the Windows platform to do the same thing.

All that being said, I agree, for the power user, Apple's new professional system is, for the most part, a clear-cut better value.

Hi nathaminal, Todd couple of points (3?) but apart from that Mis specification
Your entire point 2 is based on fallacious argument, since you say... If they forego the workstation graphics cards..... What if we forego mutilcore, and just fit an 8088? You can't compare apples with apples, by saying well, if they were both bananas they would be the same.
1. It's not just reasonable, it's great value
2. Bs argument see above
3. You are still missing thunderbolt, and a myriad of other items.
Finally your last statement makes no sense, "for the most part, a clear cut". Nonsense, are you not one of thos people whol does not like to not admit there may not be a cheaper build it yourself system, comparing apples to apples?
post #18 of 130
Now I just wish they did a 2000-2500$ Pro with graphics cards better suited for gaming. These are extremely powerful but don't fare that well in games because they are not leant for it. I mean, that would be my dream machine. Can't wait for the Apple 4K thunderbolt screen too!
post #19 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by nathanimal View Post

A couple of things:

1. While Apple is certainly charging a reasonable price for the Mac Pro, given what they owe the OEMs for the GPUs and the CPU, choosing that particular OCZ drive is a little strange. Besides it's intangible actual cost and low availability, there are other SSDs with a similar capacity and speed to the Apple SSD for $1000-1200 from NewEgg, which is obviously the retailer you are using.

2. The Windows (and Hackintosh) crowd could build a system that is theoretically close in spec to this machine for thousands less if they forego the workstation graphics cards, which are sold with enormous margins to business users to support them, and so they can make a profit after the razor thin margins of their gaming GPU lineups - many of which have just has much horsepower as the FirePro/Quadro cards, but without the proprietary OpenGL firmware that locks those cards out of using AutoCAD and other such programs.

3. OK, three things. I did a apples-to-apples comparison using the baseline (4-core) system, again getting FirePro GPUs, and when it was all put together, the cost was 200-400 shy of the Mac Pro, depending on how fancy a case you wanted to use. Of course, this leaves out the fact that Windows comes with very little software to do anything useful, and the fact that Apple is selling their professional media creation programs at a fraction of the cost of anything comparable for the Windows platform to do the same thing.

All that being said, I agree, for the power user, Apple's new professional system is, for the most part, a clear-cut better value.

Yes, in my calculation, a windows machine similar to the 3000$ model costs at least 2200$. The price difference for having a beautiful, small, extremely quiet machine running a better OS is justified. It's much more justified than for MacBooks IMO.
post #20 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by nathanimal View Post

A couple of things:

1. While Apple is certainly charging a reasonable price for the Mac Pro, given what they owe the OEMs for the GPUs and the CPU, choosing that particular OCZ drive is a little strange. Besides it's intangible actual cost and low availability, there are other SSDs with a similar capacity and speed to the Apple SSD for $1000-1200 from NewEgg, which is obviously the retailer you are using.

2. The Windows (and Hackintosh) crowd could build a system that is theoretically close in spec to this machine for thousands less if they forego the workstation graphics cards, which are sold with enormous margins to business users to support them, and so they can make a profit after the razor thin margins of their gaming GPU lineups - many of which have just has much horsepower as the FirePro/Quadro cards, but without the proprietary OpenGL firmware that locks those cards out of using AutoCAD and other such programs.

3. OK, three things. I did a apples-to-apples comparison using the baseline (4-core) system, again getting FirePro GPUs, and when it was all put together, the cost was 200-400 shy of the Mac Pro, depending on how fancy a case you wanted to use. Of course, this leaves out the fact that Windows comes with very little software to do anything useful, and the fact that Apple is selling their professional media creation programs at a fraction of the cost of anything comparable for the Windows platform to do the same thing.

All that being said, I agree, for the power user, Apple's new professional system is, for the most part, a clear-cut better value.

Three points:
- The Mac Pro does include two full graphics cards, not just GPU chips.
- Any Hackintosh you build will also be at least twice as loud (given that it will need at least two additional much smaller fans)
- A Hackintosh is not a good choice for a professional user since using an unlicensed operating system is not a sound business practice
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Storage is one area where Apple has a leg up on the do-it-yourself crowd, as the handful of PCI Express-based drives on the market command astronomical prices. OCZ's soon-to-be-discontinued RevoDrive 3 X2 series is the current king of the hill and a 960 gigabyte model would set us back approximately $3,000 --?if we could actually find one for sale.

OWC sells a 960Gb PCIe SSD for $1,199

And I'm sure this $14k machine price will drop considerably if they could also just order the GPU chips instead of the whole card. Never mind configuring the bare bone $2,999 model.



One other, somewhat meaningless point. The OWC unit is a card with two PCIe SSDs in it and even the RevoDrive is nowhere near the form factor of the Apple Drive. The early Mac Pro tests also show the Mac Pro transfer rates to the internal drive are about 100MB/s faster than either of those options are claiming.
post #21 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by ClemyNX View Post


Yes, in my calculation, a windows machine similar to the 3000$ model costs at least 2200$. The price difference for having a beautiful, small, extremely quiet machine running a better OS is justified. It's much more justified than for MacBooks IMO.

You have to show your work for credit....
post #22 of 130
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post
Since a computer is just a toaster without its operating system, we added a Windows 8.1 Pro license that set us back $199.99.

 

Ah yes.  The Windows Tax.  $200 isn't much compared to the $14,310 total price.

That's just 1.4% of the total.

 

But if you're the kind of hobbyist who claims "Ah kin built me a 'puter fer jess two hunnert bucks,"

you're looking at a 50% Windows Tax (for Windows 8.1 Pro, that is.)

Good luck setting all those jumpers.

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post #23 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wovel View Post

You have to show your work for credit....
I did that months ago. But other people on other websites have a number between 2000 and 2900 $
post #24 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by ClemyNX View Post

I did that months ago. But other people on other websites have a number between 2000 and 2900 $

Go ahead and post your work here again please
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post #25 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Storage is one area where Apple has a leg up on the do-it-yourself crowd, as the handful of PCI Express-based drives on the market command astronomical prices. OCZ's soon-to-be-discontinued RevoDrive 3 X2 series is the current king of the hill and a 960 gigabyte model would set us back approximately $3,000 --?if we could actually find one for sale.

In a recent AI discussion on the subject I, too, tried to use the RevoDrive to find a comparable PCIe SSD for comparison but later was shown (sorry, I forget who it was) that OWC has a PCIe SSD that is much closer to what Apple charges for the upgrade to 1TB.



edit: Oops! I guess I closed my MBP before that sent and it looks like PhilBoogie has pipped my comment.

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post #26 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by ClemyNX View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wovel View Post

You have to show your work for credit....
I did that months ago. But other people on other websites have a number between 2000 and 2900 $

Ok , link one of them then. If there are so many, it should be easy to do. I can't find even one. The only one i have seen even close to that number with similar hardware was using a used CPU.


To clarify my last point. The CPU in the entry model retails around $1,000 dollars, but a lot of people think it retails for $293 because if you Google it, the first two links you find are at the price. Both of those links are for CPUs pulled from other machines. That is obviously not the right item to compare a new machine too.
Edited by Wovel - 12/24/13 at 11:19am
post #27 of 130

Even some of the most virulent c|net Apple haters were commenting on the price of the Mac Pro and how it wasn’t out of line at all when considering the parts list. Of course the dumb ones were already claiming they could build one of their own twice as powerful for a fifth the price. Stupid is as stupid does.

post #28 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by realwarder View Post

Those graphics cards are staggeringly expensive!

They mark up the FirePros considerably and they use different drivers. The DIY builders would probably stick with 7970s:

http://forums.macrumors.com/showthread.php?t=1594669

These use 250W each and are around $500 for 6GB versions.

$90 case + $2750 CPU + $1000 GPUs + $540 motherboard + $200 1kW Power Supply (650W would be pushing it for 2x250W GPUs + 130W CPU) + OWC 960GB PCIe SSD $1200 + $840 RAM + $100 cooling equipment + $200 Windows.

Even if you went this route and nearly equivalent components, you're still looking at $6920. While that saves some money from the $9599 Mac ($9240 if you get your own RAM), you end up with a horrible big PC box with hacked together parts that aren't guaranteed to work well - here's a review for that motherboard:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/SingleProductReview.aspx?reviewid=3870815

Even in a sort of best-case, the Mac Pro would be under 40% more, which is a small enough premium to get a nicely designed, quiet box with parts tested to work well together.

There's another test here with a Dell 4K display:



Very quiet even when doing all those things.
post #29 of 130
This comparison method is the same as the technique used by the Microsoft/PC crowd from about 1985 onwards. The argument is generally that you can buy 'equivalent' parts for 25 cents on the dollar, hence Mac is vastly overpriced. This approach is invalid, even when the bits for a PC actually cost more.

What this superficial method overlooks falls into at least 3 distinct areas:

(1) a not insignificant number appreciate elegance in design. Mac has always knocked PCs into a cocked hat on this score. You get what you pay for. It's similar to preferring a Rolex to a Casio, or a Porsche to a Ford.

(2) it's the marriage of good software and good hardware, designed to work together, that leads to a seamless working environment. You need to make both to achieve this at a high level.

(3) computers are tools for the mind. Every objective survey I've ever read puts Mac users at a higher productivity level. In general, therefore, you get more done on a Mac, and any cost difference soon gets mitigated as the return on your investment starts to flow.
post #30 of 130
Great article that only hints at one the biggest issues in trying to create a WORKSTATION (nods to performance vs price point trade offs that Workstations like SGI, HP, Sun and others created striving for the top end of what can be put on a desktop btw) which is dealing with the Thermal Design.
As one who spent decades in HW application support of embedded Intel Processor designs, I have known for a long time that this item, often left to the end of a design (whither it is an embedded PC like a cash register or the Hubble Telescope or just a White Box PC being used for Medical Work) is the Thermal Design. Many an engineer (and or White Box builder) has stumbled at this point by leaving it to the end, like the Lian Li configuration presented, to find it beyond challenging!!
Thermal design has to be considered from start to finish! While I have seen talk of a chimney or volcano like themal / Max Tpd solution (the Intel 2000 IDF focused on this subject), never have I seen it executed this this level !! Fan noise is another and Apple address both with design elegance!! A PC that would be deserving to be put in the NY Museum of modern art...

While one might find a lower price for the dual GPU cards or other items like Linux vs Windows, this review peg it with ease - showing the true value of the Mac Pro for the Professional vs a high end "White Box".
post #31 of 130
What's funny is that the motherboard they chose doesn't even fit into their case.

Also, using a $3k SSD when you could have used a $1.2k one, using those GPUs for no really good reason, choosing a dual socket motherboard just because (and then not adding a second CPU) sort of indicate not much research was done for this article.
post #32 of 130
And... if you really want to... the Mac will run Windows for you. Probably better than the Windows machine. LOL!
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post #33 of 130
The price on those graphics cards is obviously ridiculously inflated. If anything this article shows that a comparable system would cost about as much -- which one should expect.
post #34 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by sodaant View Post

What's funny is that the motherboard they chose doesn't even fit into their case.

Also, using a $3k SSD when you could have used a $1.2k one, using those GPUs for no really good reason, choosing a dual socket motherboard just because (and then not adding a second CPU) sort of indicate not much research was done for this article.


This is AI - you didn't come here expecting an unbiased comparison, did you?

post #35 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by runbuh View Post
 


This is AI - you didn't come here expecting an unbiased comparison, did you?

No, I just expected a little better research.

post #36 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by RadarTheKat View Post

And... if you really want to... the Mac will run Windows for you. Probably better than the Windows machine. LOL!


Works great as long as you don't care about driver updates, and if you don't care if the Trackpad works worth a damn (under Windows).

post #37 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by runbuh View Post


Works great as long as you don't care about driver updates, and if you don't care if the Trackpad works worth a damn (under Windows).

Oddly, I read that the new MBPs have 60Hz 4K video out on the TB2 ports under Windows, yet no support with Mac OS. You have to use the HDMI port and you only get 30Hz.

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post #38 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by sodaant View Post
 

No, I just expected a little better research.


Just a matter of finding the facts that fit the story...

post #39 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post


Oddly, I read that the new MBPs have 60Hz 4K video out on the TB2 ports under Windows, yet no support with Mac OS. You have to use the HDMI port and you only get 30Hz.

This can be addressed with a driver update?

post #40 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by runbuh View Post

This can be addressed with a driver update?

It can, and I suspect it will be. I assume the reason for Windows getting it sooner is the Windows drivers for those TB2 controllers were developed by the maker of the controllers but Apple is developing their own for the MBPs, which they may not release until they have their own 4K display or some other Appley reason that ultimately seems weird to me.
Edited by SolipsismX - 12/24/13 at 2:46pm

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"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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