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Rumor: LG hopes to catch up to Apple with fingerprint sensor in next-gen Android phone

post #1 of 114
Thread Starter 
LG Electronics is reportedly testing a prototype version of the next generation of its flagship G-series smartphones that will allegedly include a swipe-based fingerprint sensor, countering the Touch ID capability of Apple's iPhone 5s.

Touch ID


The so-called "G3" from LG is said to currently be in testing, according to a report published this week by The Korea Herald. The next-generation Android handset is reportedly expected to debut at the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, scheduled for February of 2014.

However, unlike Apple's Touch ID fingerprint sensor embedded in the iPhone 5s home button, which allows a user to simply place their finger on the scanner, LG's method "would likely come as a swipe fingerprint sensor," the report said. That would suggest that LG has been unable to replicate the patented, unique fingerprint scanning technology Apple acquired in its purchase of security firm AuthenTec.

The Times report also cited an unnamed source who indicated that Apple plans to bring Touch ID to a "broader range of its products, including smartphones and tablet PCs." Touch ID debuted on the iPhone 5s in September, but was not added to Apple's late 2013 iPad lineup, leaving the feature exclusive to the company's flagship smartphone for the time being.

Touch ID


LG's rumored "G3" smartphone is also reportedly expected to include Google's Android 4.4 Kitkat operating system, as well as a "Quad HD" display and a 2.2-gigahertz octa-core processor. The report also said that LG is developing a wearable smart watch and health and fitness wrist band that will sync to the "G3," and those devices are also rumored to debut at the Mobile World Congress event.

LG is not to be confused with LG Display, an independent company that is also a key supplier for Apple, providing high-resolution panels for the iPhone and iPad. In October, one rumor claimed that LG Display will provide OLED screens for Apple's rumored wrist-worn "iWatch" accessory.
post #2 of 114

How is everyone doing with Touch ID? Mine is quite flaky, working about 20% of the time. 

post #3 of 114

It won't be as good. All these "rushed" to market copies of Apple's tech are inferior. Mainly b/c they are "rushed!"

 

Best

post #4 of 114
There's something about these iPhone competitors, but I quite cannot put my finger on it...
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post #5 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Getz View Post

How is everyone doing with Touch ID? Mine is quite flaky, working about 20% of the time. 
Have you re-scanned your fingers? imore.com had a piece up a while back with some tips on what you can do if touch ID isn't always working properly.
post #6 of 114
Mine works great! I love the feature%u2026 easy Apple/iTunes store paying too. I now get so annoyed having to type in anything for security. Just saying.
post #7 of 114
Yeah my sensor works like 99% of the time... I'm anxious to see these other guys mess things up
post #8 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post

There's something about these iPhone competitors, but I quite cannot put my finger on it...
So 64-bit in a mobile chip is a gimmick, then Qualcomm and Samsung announce they'll have 64-bit chips in 2014. Same thing with touch ID. Media labels it a gimmick, then HTC puts one in a phone and now Samsung and LG are rumored to be working on something for their mobile devices. 1rolleyes.gif
post #9 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Getz View Post

How is everyone doing with Touch ID? Mine is quite flaky, working about 20% of the time. 

If my wife can do it anyone can. 1biggrin.gif. She has not had any problems whatsoever. My guess is your initial set up wasn't done quite right.
Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
nMac Pro 6 Core, MacBookPro i7, MacBookPro i5, iPhones 5 and 5s, iPad Air, 2013 Mac mini, SE30, IIFx, Towers; G4 & G3.
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Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
nMac Pro 6 Core, MacBookPro i7, MacBookPro i5, iPhones 5 and 5s, iPad Air, 2013 Mac mini, SE30, IIFx, Towers; G4 & G3.
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post #10 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post

So 64-bit in a mobile chip is a gimmick, then Qualcomm and Samsung announce they'll have 64-bit chips in 2014. Same thing with touch ID. Media labels it a gimmick, then HTC puts one in a phone and now Samsung and LG are rumored to be working on something for their mobile devices. 1rolleyes.gif

Lead and they. Shall follow.

I'm surprises Scamsung didn't say they make a 128-bit chip 1oyvey.gif
Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
nMac Pro 6 Core, MacBookPro i7, MacBookPro i5, iPhones 5 and 5s, iPad Air, 2013 Mac mini, SE30, IIFx, Towers; G4 & G3.
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Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
nMac Pro 6 Core, MacBookPro i7, MacBookPro i5, iPhones 5 and 5s, iPad Air, 2013 Mac mini, SE30, IIFx, Towers; G4 & G3.
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post #11 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Getz View Post

How is everyone doing with Touch ID? Mine is quite flaky, working about 20% of the time. 

Mine works abou 99% of the time. The only issue I had was one I messed up the tips on the 3 fingers I had scanned in. I rescanned one as a 4th print and it worked fine until they healed up. Now they all 3 work great again. It is actually one of those things I still think is pretty impressive after a few months of use.
post #12 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post

There's something about these iPhone competitors, but I quite cannot put my finger on it...
So 64-bit in a mobile chip is a gimmick, then Qualcomm and Samsung announce they'll have 64-bit chips in 2014. Same thing with touch ID. Media labels it a gimmick, then HTC puts one in a phone and now Samsung and LG are rumored to be working on something for their mobile devices. 1rolleyes.gif

Sad, isn't it. All this putting down of Apple inventions, or new uses of earlier implementations of some technology, but when the competition also implements an earlier tech, or shamelessly copy the idea/design/tech from Apple it is somehow considered 'obvious'. Take a peek down history lane:

Apple moves laptop keyboard to the back, near the screen, creating an armrest while typing. All laptops therefrom adopt the same design and trolls tell us this is only logical evolution,
Apple integrates the battery in their iPods. Competitors music players start to do the same. Same thing happened after Apple's new laptop design, same thing with the iPhone. And now tablets,
"A virtual keyboard on a touchscreen? No way that'll work!" But when they see their market share drop and think "well, we might need to do this as well as Apple is taking away all our customers who used to be so loyal to us".
Next thing we'll see is them removing the ODD, soldered RAM/GPU and trolls will...

Ah, what's the use. They will simply never get it. Apple does. Perhaps all Wall St. blue-suit-red-tie wannabes are also trolls working for Apple competitors to write such nonsense. I think Jess3 illustrated it best in The Zen of Steve Jobs:

"Fibonacci: As easy as 1, 1, 2, 3..."
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post #13 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Getz View Post

How is everyone doing with Touch ID? Mine is quite flaky, working about 20% of the time. 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Getz View Post

How is everyone doing with Touch ID? Mine is quite flaky, working about 20% of the time. 

Almost never fails for me.
Try retraining.
post #14 of 114
Let them catch! It took them years to catch the screen detection of the touchscreen (when not hindered by bad software that makes it slow anyway). I don't think they'll catch with touchID soon. I'm still amazed at how fast it is. I keep on forgetting it is there.
post #15 of 114
A lot of ideas are said to be simple gimmicks. . .
until the ones saying so decide to use the idea themselves. Larger-display smartphones are "gimmicks" too. Once upon a time smaller iPads would have been considered "gimmicky". If something is desired by the marketplace there will be plenty of companies vying to fill it whether it's a gimmick or not.
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post #16 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Getz View Post

How is everyone doing with Touch ID? Mine is quite flaky, working about 20% of the time. 

Mine works really well for the most part, although sometimes the sensor just won't activate it seems. It pulls up the dial pad, and won't attempt to read my thumb print. I can punch in the code and then try it again, and it works fine (and this isn't just after a reboot - I know you have to punch in the code after that). Any new tech is going to have its growing pains. Mine works most of the time, so the times that it doesn't aren't annoying.
post #17 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Getz View Post

How is everyone doing with Touch ID? Mine is quite flaky, working about 20% of the time. 
I'm not blaming you, some people are having issues. Might be due to the shape of your prints or the way your skin changes during the day, or something else. I have no problem myself. I have scanned 4 fingers, and haven't changed the prints for more than a month. It works almost all the time, I'd say more than 90% and close to 95% of the time. And if it doesn't work on the first try, it always does on the second.
post #18 of 114
I wish them luck but there are several parts to this that I don't think are easily tackled. Are they going to create their own SoC or at least create their own secure chip to store the encrypted hashes? Will they use sapphire crystal? Are they acquiring any companies to make this happen? And where is Samsung in all of this? I would have thought they would be first out of the gate with SSecure or something.

PS: I wonder if TouchID requires the increased security features of AArch64.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Getz View Post

How is everyone doing with Touch ID? Mine is quite flaky, working about 20% of the time. 

I haven't had any issues. I wonder if people are scanning in their prints in the manner that is shown on the graphic. Meaning, vertical and straight down in an unnatural position. I did mine on an angle in the position I would most likely try to do a scan when holding it with one hand.
Edited by SolipsismX - 12/27/13 at 7:52am

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post #19 of 114

Adding touch id to Android is like improving the lock on your door when all the windows are open. A waste of time, in other words.

post #20 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Getz View Post
 

How is everyone doing with Touch ID? Mine is quite flaky, working about 20% of the time. 

 

Mine works 99% of the time.

 

Delete all your prints and start again.

Personally I scanned my same finger in 4 of the slots.  Works amazingly well.

 

Anytime it doesn't work its for obvious reasons: hands wet or sticky or scanned very edge of finger.

 

The feature is so awesome.  I also have an iPadAir and I wish it had the fingerprint scanner everytime i need to swipe and enter my password.

post #21 of 114
"Where is Samsung in all of this?"

The rumor chatter is Samsung is developing a retina scanner to top Touch ID.
post #22 of 114
"Swift generally gets you to the right way much quicker."
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post #23 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post


So 64-bit in a mobile chip is a gimmick, then Qualcomm and Samsung announce they'll have 64-bit chips in 2014. Same thing with touch ID. Media labels it a gimmick, then HTC puts one in a phone and now Samsung and LG are rumored to be working on something for their mobile devices. 1rolleyes.gif

At the current moment it is because there is no software or hardware now or in the immediate future that will take advantage of the benefits 64 bit brings on a mobile device, ie have more than four GB of system RAM., the iphone 5s only has one GB.

 

They are only doing it because the average consumer just looks at the number and will think it is superior but when you look at the specs of the phones none of them come close to having enough system RAM for 64 bit to make any difference.

post #24 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post

Lead and they. Shall follow.

I'm surprises Scamsung didn't say they make a 128-bit chip 1oyvey.gif

Don't you mean 65- bit? That extra bit is the S-bit.
Edited by SolipsismX - 12/27/13 at 9:22am

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"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #25 of 114
richard getz 12/27/2013 09:45 AM
How is everyone doing with Touch ID? Mine is quite flaky, working about 20% of the time.

Mine works 99% of the time. Index finger on one hand and thumb on the other
post #26 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by Noliving View Post
 

At the current moment it is because there is no software or hardware now or in the immediate future that will take advantage of the benefits 64 bit brings on a mobile device, ie have more than four GB of system RAM., the iphone 5s only has one GB.

 

They are only doing it because the average consumer just looks at the number and will think it is superior but when you look at the specs of the phones none of them come close to having enough system RAM for 64 bit to make any difference.

 

very ignorant post

post #27 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by Noliving View Post

At the current moment it is because there is no software or hardware now or in the immediate future that will take advantage of the benefits 64 bit brings on a mobile device, ie have more than four GB of system RAM., the iphone 5s only has one GB.

They are only doing it because the average consumer just looks at the number and will think it is superior but when you look at the specs of the phones none of them come close to having enough system RAM for 64 bit to make any difference.

:sigh:

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"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #28 of 114
Originally Posted by Noliving View Post
At the current moment it is because there is no software or hardware now or in the immediate future that will take advantage of the benefits 64 bit brings on a mobile device, ie have more than four GB of system RAM., the iphone 5s only has one GB.

 

Don’t post about 64-bit again until you’ve educated yourself.

Originally posted by Marvin

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post #29 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by Noliving View Post

At the current moment it is because there is no software or hardware now or in the immediate future that will take advantage of the benefits 64 bit brings on a mobile device, ie have more than four GB of system RAM., the iphone 5s only has one GB.

They are only doing it because the average consumer just looks at the number and will think it is superior but when you look at the specs of the phones none of them come close to having enough system RAM for 64 bit to make any difference.

No more posts till you do some reading. Start here:

http://appleinsider.com/articles/13/10/04/apples-64-bit-a7-already-powering-advanced-new-audio-video-features-in-apps-and-games
post #30 of 114
Almost 100% functional. About a month ago, however, touch ID stopped working entirely. Had to reboot the iPhone. The iPhone is never off, otherwise.
post #31 of 114
The android version will require the user to lick the screen to unlock the phone.
post #32 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by vaporland View Post

The android version will require the user to lick the screen to unlock it.

...only twice tho.
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post #33 of 114

Is anyone else looking at the tag-alongs and their game of bigger numbers as getting to be stupid?

 

I am not talking about 32 vs 64-bit, which has been shown to have benefits in the majority of computing practices. As has been pretty well displayed in the computer field. What I am talking about is the recent trend to push the resolution of phone screens to stupid levels. This phone is talking about having a 1440x2560 resolution. If this phone has a 5.5" 16:9 screen then this will equate to a 534 ppi screen. This means that using the 1 arcminute of visual acuity for humans that is pretty widely accepted and supported that a person would have to hold this screen at about 6 inches from their eye to even resolve the individual pixels. Who uses their phone at this distance? In fact, this is about the closest that a touchscreen can practically be used because moving the screen much closer than this and it becomes physically difficult to use your finger without hitting yourself in the face.

 

And this isn't even as bad as the move to eight core processors. WTF! The benefits of this being useful in the majority of computing processes has already been shown to be negligible in the computing world. Sure, there are some applications where the more cores the better, but there are far more things that computers are used for where more cores gives little to no benefit as the process cannot be efficiently parallelized. When personal computers, as separate from workstations, haven't found a practical reason to move beyond quad-core processors in the last decade why does anyone think that a smartphone would benefit from this?

 

What a joke.

post #34 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by st88 View Post
 

There is more to 64-bit than just RAM, but in all fairness Apple shills would have you believe the jump is substantial. According to Futuremark running 64-bit software on the iPhone 5S only offers up to 7% improved performance over 32-bit software. 

 

"We started our investigation by compiling a 64-bit version of 3DMark, since the version available in the App Store is 32-bit in order to be compatible with older Apple devices. 

Once we had a 64-bit build we tested an iPhone 5s under controlled conditions in our Test Lab. As expected, we found that the results from the 64-bit version were similar to the 32-bit version, with only a 7 percent improvement. That is not enough to change the ranking of the iPhone 5s in our Best Mobile Devices list." Futuremark


I am not arguing that this is what they saw, but as always, the fact that this is an artificial benchmark has to be kept in mind. There are certain applications where the move to 64-bit *is* huge, much more than 7%. However, as with most things in technology, there are tradeoffs. There are some applications where the move to 64-bit actually will slow down the application. On the whole though the move to 64-bit is a good thing and as more and more applications move to 64-bit more applications will see benefits.

 

What I haven't figured out is all of these people deriding it because there is very little software optimized to take advantage of 64-bit. DUH! Did they actually believe that anyone would start optimizing for a system that doesn't exist? Someone had to make the first step to 64-bit so that developers would follow. Apple did it first, and as usual they will catch the flack for being the trailblazer, while the Android crowd will reap many of the benefits because of Apple's effort. In this case, when Android vendors get around to releasing 64-bit phones they will get more 64-bit optimized apps faster because many developers will have already done the heavy work to support iOS.

 

The fact still remains that it is easier to follow than to lead.

post #35 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post

So 64-bit in a mobile chip is a gimmick, then Qualcomm and Samsung announce they'll have 64-bit chips in 2014. Same thing with touch ID. Media labels it a gimmick, then HTC puts one in a phone and now Samsung and LG are rumored to be working on something for their mobile devices. 1rolleyes.gif

Quote:
Originally Posted by Noliving View Post

At the current moment it is because there is no software or hardware now or in the immediate future that will take advantage of the benefits 64 bit brings on a mobile device, ie have more than four GB of system RAM., the iphone 5s only has one GB.

They are only doing it because the average consumer just looks at the number and will think it is superior but when you look at the specs of the phones none of them come close to having enough system RAM for 64 bit to make any difference.


This is, of course, ludicrous. A 64 bit architecture offers 64 bit address buses, data buses and registers which provide independently verifiable, significant performance improvements.
post #36 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by leavingthebigG View Post

"Where is Samsung in all of this?"

The rumor chatter is Samsung is developing a retina scanner to top Touch ID.

 

And how exactly is this going to top Touch ID? The first thought that popped up in my head was: "Oh great, herds of people are now going to walk under the bus".

post #37 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

I wish them luck but there are several parts to this that I don't think are easily tackled. Are they going to create their own SoC or at least create their own secure chip to store the encrypted hashes? Will they use sapphire crystal? Are they acquiring any companies to make this happen? And where is Samsung in all of this? I would have thought they would be first out of the gate with SSecure or something.

PS: I wonder if TouchID requires the increased security features of AArch64.
I haven't had any issues. I wonder if people are scanning in their prints in the manner that is shown on the graphic. Meaning, vertical and straight down in an unnatural position. I did mine on an angle in the position I would most likely try to do a scan when holding it with one hand.

some people's fingertips just don't register well for whatever reason - like my wife's. but Touch ID works fine for me on same phone. i helped her try to setup, so no difference there. obviously has to be something to do with her skin - it is kind of calloused.

post #38 of 114

i'm sure all the other OEM's are "working on" some kind of biometric ID, fingerprints or whatever. but coming up with a reliable consumer product version is obviously very hard to do, since only Apple has succeeded so far. it will be very interesting to see how long it takes them to match Apple technology. 2014? we'll see. until then, all they got is hype.

 

and methods like facial recognition or retina scans or voice ID are not as flexible. Touch ID clearly has potential to be used for retail sales, third-party ID confirmation, etc., when the user needs to confirm something. how would you do that with facial recog - stick you tongue out? or retina scan - blink five times? or voice - speak your PIN out loud?

post #39 of 114
A retina scan is supposed to be more secure than a fingerprint scan.

History will let us all know if the retina scanner feature is more secure and useful than Touch ID.
post #40 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alfiejr View Post

some people's fingertips just don't register well for whatever reason - like my wife's. but Touch ID works fine for me on same phone. i helped her try to setup, so no difference there. obviously has to be something to do with her skin - it is kind of calloused.

Interesting. With all the hinge being used for Touch ID I would have thought even a calloused finger would work.

Have you tried a different part of her finger? Like the first thumb knuckle or inside side of the thumb?

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"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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