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HTC details how carriers, chipset makers stall & block Android OS updates

post #1 of 58
Thread Starter 
Taiwanese smartphone maker HTC has shed light on the complex route Android updates must navigate before hitting customer devices, helping to explain why operating system updates take some time to arrive, and how, for some device owners, such updates never even arrive at all.

Android Update Process


HTC has detailed the circuitous 12-step process as part of their Software Update status page, which tracks the company's progress in rolling out the latest version of Android to their flagship handsets. A monstrous 10,000-pixel-tall infographic walks readers the procedure, beginning when Google notifies the carriers of what they will include in Android's next version bump.

Before the update's public announcement, Google releases a "Platform Development Kit," or PDK, to its manufacturing partners. The PDK is essentially the hardware equivalent of a software SDK --?it provides the tools necessary for device manufacturers to build Android-compatible hardware.

The update's source code is not released until after Google makes their public announcement, when it is shipped off to both handset manufacturers, like HTC, and chipset makers, such as Qualcomm, for evaluation. Both parties must agree to support the update before it can move forward, the first of several points at which the process can be derailed.No less than four stakeholders must agree in order for an Android update to run the gauntlet and make it to customer devices.

Chipset makers that elect to move forward with the update then begin the process of creating and optimizing new drivers for their hardware. It is up to each manufacturer to decide which chipsets will be targeted -- devices using chipsets that do not make the cut, no matter their age, will be unable to run the newest Android version.

Until this point, the process is the same for all three classes of Android devices made by HTC --?carrier devices, customized for and sold by carriers like Verizon Wireless; unlocked and developer edition devices, sold directly from HTC to customers; and Google Play edition devices, which run versions of Android unadulterated with carrier or manufacturer customizations. Once the chipset makers have had their say, however, each device follows a slightly different path.

For carrier and developer devices, the handset manufacturer can begin merging the Android and chipset updates with their existing code base. In HTC's case, this means integrating their HTC Sense user interface customizations.

Carriers then become involved, dictating which special applications, services, and carrier-specific modifications will need to be made. Google Play and developer edition devices are not subject to the carriers' whims, one reason why those handsets have already received their Android 4.4 "KitKat" updates while carrier phones have been forced to wait until 2014.

Android Update Process


After internal testing, the updates are sent out for certification by carriers, regulatory bodies, and Google itself. Any of these players can delay the update and force changes to be made, but Google maintains final approval - without Mountain View's OK, the update will never see the light of day.

Apple, in comparison, faces a single stakeholder when it comes to iOS updates: themselves. They need only regulatory approval and technical certification from carriers --?Apple famously released their cross-platform messaging service, iMessage, without consulting any of their carrier partners.

The effects of this dichotomy are illustrated by the latest version distribution statistics. Cupertino's newest operating system, iOS 7, now runs on more than three-quarters of all iOS devices, while Android 4.4 "KitKat" is found on a relatively miniscule 1.1 percent of devices, according to Google's developer dashboard.
post #2 of 58
If there are more insightful articles surfacing on the inner workings of Android, I wonder if their advocates will some day see the true colours of Android and understand why it is a failed product, in spite of it being copied from the best.
post #3 of 58
I'm not certain how accurate the process description is. Motorola has rolled out KitKat 4.4.2 in record time to it's MotoX and MotoG smartphones. Just three weeks after the formal announcement of 4.4 in the case of the MotoX (and Verizon of all carriers!). Maybe if some if some of the vendors didn't skin their devices so aggressively the updates could get completed quicker. Of course for some of the smaller licensees they may not care if their phone gets updated or not. 1hmm.gif

http://gigaom.com/2013/12/20/as-moto-g-gets-kitkat-motorola-becomes-a-nexus-maker-for-the-masses/
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post #4 of 58
Sounds like one mighty cluster-frell.
post #5 of 58

Google is likely working on a true mobile OS, unlike Android, that does not piggyback on Linux. It'll probably run all current apps in a virtualization mode similar to when OS9 ran on OSX, or how Android runs on top of Linux.

 

It's inevitable, it's also the only way they will be able to clean up their act.

 

 

Observation:

Appleinsider, Google has managed to remove from Wikipedia references to the fact that the first Android demo looked liked BB and instead implied that Android, as it's known today, was developed in 2005. They also removed references to the fact that Android is a piggyback OS, much like Flash to a web-browser. The whole Wikipedia Android page reads like a commercial of heroism and conquest. Who has the Wiki credentials and good English to set some facts straight?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Android_(operating_system)

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post #6 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

I'm not certain how accurate the process description is. Motorola has rolled out KitKat 4.4.2 in record time to it's MotoX and MotoG smartphones. Just three weeks after the formal announcement of 4.4 in the case of the MotoX (and Verizon of all carriers!). Maybe if some if some of the vendors didn't skin their devices so aggressively the updates could get completed quicker. Of course for some of the smaller licensees they may not care if their phone gets updated or not. 1hmm.gif

http://gigaom.com/2013/12/20/as-moto-g-gets-kitkat-motorola-becomes-a-nexus-maker-for-the-masses/

 

Google owns Motorolla so of course they will be updated.

 

Bottom line is these phone companies need to make their own OS and stop bitching about Android.  They are getting Android free so they should shut the fuk up or spend BILLIONS like Apple developing an OS.

post #7 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

I'm not certain how accurate the process description is. Motorola has rolled out KitKat 4.4.2 in record time to it's MotoX and MotoG smartphones. Just three weeks after the formal announcement of 4.4 in the case of the MotoX (and Verizon of all carriers!). Maybe if some if some of the vendors didn't skin their devices so aggressively the updates could get completed quicker. Of course for some of the smaller licensees they may not care if their phone gets updated or not. 1hmm.gif

http://gigaom.com/2013/12/20/as-moto-g-gets-kitkat-motorola-becomes-a-nexus-maker-for-the-masses/

 

Motorola IS Google.. They got to bypass much of the process. They seem to be treating the update process like a Nexus for the most part.

 

Remember, Motorola has also been Verizon's pet for years, allowing Verizon to combat the iPhone with Android for all those years they didn't have an iPhone. Motorola has pushed DRIOD moniker on Verizon for some time and they likely know how to get through Verizon's BS approval process much quicker than other players..

post #8 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by dysamoria View Post

Sounds like one mighty cluster-frell.

That is right, my dear Crichton.

 

The carriers are holding back advancement.  If it wasn't for Apple basically telling AT&T to sit down and shut up when the iPhone was launched, we'd still be staring at screenfulls of AT&T, Verizon, Sprint, et al, crapware on our screens and logos on our phones instead of the simple Apple logo on the back.  Apple's iMassage would never have been launched because of the threat to texting and texting plans.

 

Unfortunately, they are trying to get that control back and won't stop until some real competition comes along.  

post #9 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by sog35 View Post
 

 

Google owns Motorolla so of course they will be updated.

 

Bottom line is these phone companies need to make their own OS and stop bitching about Android.  They are getting Android free so they should shut the fuk up or spend BILLIONS like Apple developing an OS.

As has been demonstrated by Windows OS, Android OS, Chrome OS, Mozilla OS, and Tizon, developing an OS, let alone a lightweight OS, is no easy feat. Throwing money at it doesn't make it better or finish sooner. It will take a good 4 years for version 1.0, which may or may not have Copy Paste.

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post #10 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Adrayven View Post

Motorola IS Google.. They got to bypass much of the process.

They could only "bypass much of the process" if the carrier's allowed it. If they'll do so for Moto why not for HTC or Samsung? I personally think it has as much to do with how committed the manufacturer is to updates and the work they have to do to get it done. Skins don't help in that regard.
Edited by Gatorguy - 12/27/13 at 9:04am
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post #11 of 58
Quote:
Cupertino's newest operating system, iOS 7, now runs on more than three-quarters of all iOS devices, while Android 4.4 "KitKat" is found on a relatively miniscule 1.1 percent of devices, according to Google's developer dashboard.

 

This is true, but those scenarios cannot be compared: support for less than 10 (very similar) devices versus support for 4000+ (very different) devices.

 

While you need a specific iOS version to run certain apps or have a certain feature, Android has a different approach: most internal features are updated on all devices (if registered in Google Play) through Google Play Services automatic update (a sort of system library) and apps can be developed from the beginning with the multi-os-version support library (actually not easy to use by developers). So, even if Android versions are actually fragmented, the only real fragmentation problem is the 2.3.x (Gingerbread) support, because basically it forces developers to develop two apps. Apart from that, almost all apps for 4.0 to 4.4 are the same app (no fragmentation on developer side).

 

Im my opinion, if you want to compare quality of support in a similar scenario, you should compare "iOS devices support" with "Nexus devices support". In my experience frequency of updates is quite similar. The only difference is that after two years Apple devices still receives updated iOS, but without most new features and with a very very bad user experience (4S with iOS7 is snappy, but my iPad 1 with iOS 5.1 is barely usable).

post #12 of 58
Makes me love my iPhone more everyday. Could you image if iOS updates had to get carrier approval before being released.

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post #13 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

I'm not certain how accurate the process description is. Motorola has rolled out KitKat 4.4.2 in record time to it's MotoX and MotoG smartphones. Just three weeks after the formal announcement of 4.4 in the case of the MotoX (and Verizon of all carriers!). Maybe if some if some of the vendors didn't skin their devices so aggressively the updates could get completed quicker. Of course for some of the smaller licensees they may not care if their phone gets updated or not. 1hmm.gif

http://gigaom.com/2013/12/20/as-moto-g-gets-kitkat-motorola-becomes-a-nexus-maker-for-the-masses/

Lots also has to do with what chipsets you have. Lack of a BSP can kill an update so choosing the right HW partners is key. The skinning is just a small piece.

post #14 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by bradipao View Post

This is true, but those scenarios cannot be compared: support for less than 10 (very similar) devices versus support for 4000+ (very different) devices.

While you need a specific iOS version to run certain apps or have a certain feature, Android has a different approach: most internal features are updated on all devices (if registered in Google Play) through Google Play Services automatic update (a sort of system library) and apps can be developed from the beginning with the multi-os-version support library (actually not easy to use by developers). So, even if Android versions are actually fragmented, the only real fragmentation problem is the 2.3.x (Gingerbread) support, because basically it forces developers to develop two apps. Apart from that, almost all apps for 4.0 to 4.4 are the same app (no fragmentation on developer side).

I would imagine that updating libraries may be good for the later apps, but I'd think some older apps might get wonky.
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post #15 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post


They could only "bypass much of the process" if the carrier's allowed it. If they'll do so for Moto why not for HTC or Samsung? I personally think it has as much to do with how committed the manufacturer is to updates and the work they have to do to get it done. Skins don't help in that regard.

 

I don't think you are looking at this quite correctly. In the case of Motorola the process basically reduces down to what Apple has. In this singular case the OS creator/vendor is the same as the hardware creator/vendor. In fact, your point supports the contention that Android updates are stuck in a mess, and the only one that seems to come out with timely updates is the only one that cuts out most of the steps because they are the ones that make the OS.

post #16 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eriamjh View Post

Apple's iMassage would never have been launched...

I'd take one of those from Siri any day
post #17 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

I'm not certain how accurate the process description is. Motorola has rolled out KitKat 4.4.2 in record time to it's MotoX and MotoG smartphones. Just three weeks after the formal announcement of 4.4 in the case of the MotoX (and Verizon of all carriers!). Maybe if some if some of the vendors didn't skin their devices so aggressively the updates could get completed quicker. Of course for some of the smaller licensees they may not care if their phone gets updated or not. 1hmm.gif

http://gigaom.com/2013/12/20/as-moto-g-gets-kitkat-motorola-becomes-a-nexus-maker-for-the-masses/

"Just three weeks." Google owns Moto so of course they would have advanced knowledge.

Btw, record time is immediate as with iOS.
post #18 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by bloggerblog View Post
 

As has been demonstrated by Windows OS, Android OS, Chrome OS, Mozilla OS, and Tizon, developing an OS, let alone a lightweight OS, is no easy feat. Throwing money at it doesn't make it better or finish sooner. It will take a good 4 years for version 1.0, which may or may not have Copy Paste.

 

Bottom line is the phone companies have zero incentive to send updates or authorize updates.  They love the fact that after 1 or 2 years Android phones are basically feature phones since many of the apps won't work anymore.  Then people will buy new phones and pay subsidies again.  Why would phone companies want Android phones to update?  It would only increase their life span and take away from their bottom line.

post #19 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by bradipao View Post
 

 

This is true, but those scenarios cannot be compared: support for less than 10 (very similar) devices versus support for 4000+ (very different) devices.

 

While you need a specific iOS version to run certain apps or have a certain feature, Android has a different approach: most internal features are updated on all devices (if registered in Google Play) through Google Play Services automatic update (a sort of system library) and apps can be developed from the beginning with the multi-os-version support library (actually not easy to use by developers). So, even if Android versions are actually fragmented, the only real fragmentation problem is the 2.3.x (Gingerbread) support, because basically it forces developers to develop two apps. Apart from that, almost all apps for 4.0 to 4.4 are the same app (no fragmentation on developer side).

 

Im my opinion, if you want to compare quality of support in a similar scenario, you should compare "iOS devices support" with "Nexus devices support". In my experience frequency of updates is quite similar. The only difference is that after two years Apple devices still receives updated iOS, but without most new features and with a very very bad user experience (4S with iOS7 is snappy, but my iPad 1 with iOS 5.1 is barely usable).

 

Comparing iOS to Android is fair.

 

What is unfair is comparing 300,000,000 iOS devices to a few million Nexus devices.  Big deal Google updates Nexus when Androids 10 top selling phones are stuck on 2 generation old OS.  If you bought the top Android flagship phone Samsung S4 last month you are already using an out of date OS.  That's pathetic.  I don't care who's responsible its pathetic.  If it was really important to Samsung they could force phone companies to send updates but its not important to them.  They spend billions on commercials but don't have the decency to update THEIR FLAGSHIP PHONE THATS NOT EVEN 9 MONTHS OLD!  Now I'm reading news the S4 may get a KitKat update in January. What a joke.

 

Bottom line is companies like Google, Samsung, LG, ect don't give a shet about the customer experience.  All they care about is you buy their phones and see their ads.  After that you are on your own.  Personally I've been on an Android phone and tablet for 2 years.  This Oct I finally made the switch to iOS (5S/iPadAir/AppleTV) and the difference is night and day. 

post #20 of 58
Quote:
 HTC details how carriers, chipset makers stall & block Android OS updates

 

What HTC provided was a dispassionate account of the process.

 

'stall' and 'block' are loaded terms, introduced through the usual creeping dishonesty which impregnates this site's reporting.

post #21 of 58
The moral of this story is to buy a Motorola product if you prefer the freedom of Android and want updates delivered quickly.
post #22 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Euphonious View Post

...

'stall' and 'block' are loaded terms, introduced through the usual creeping dishonesty which impregnates this site's reporting.

 

^^ wow!

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post #23 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Smallwheels View Post

The moral of this story is to buy a Motorola product if you prefer the freedom of Android and want updates delivered quickly.

 

but they only update devices newer than 2 years......

post #24 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by sog35 View Post

Google owns Motorolla so of course they will be updated.

Bottom line is these phone companies need to make their own OS and stop bitching about Android.  They are getting Android free so they should shut the fuk up or spend BILLIONS like Apple developing an OS.

Do you really think that the market would support a multitude of mobile OSs? Would developers make apps for 4-5 different OSs? That's an unreasonable suggestion, and one that would most certainly spell doom for many involved.
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post #25 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by sog35 View Post

but they only update devices newer than 2 years......

That's not true, this time around the GNex was left out only because of it's processor's incapability. If I remember correctly the GNex has a Texas Instruments processor that's no longer being used in any other devices.
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post #26 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Smallwheels View Post

The moral of this story is to buy a Motorola product if you prefer the freedom of Android and want updates delivered quickly.

Or a Nexus.
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post #27 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by bradipao View Post

 

Im my opinion, if you want to compare quality of support in a similar scenario, you should compare "iOS devices support" with "Nexus devices support".

 

Nope. You can't just cherry pick which Android devices you want to compare with all iOS devices in order to win some arbitrary fanboy argument.

 

If fandroids are going to go around spouting "market share", then you have to take the good with the bad. Otherwise, if we're only supposed to compare iPhones and Nexuses, then that must carry over to market share as well, should it not?

 

But, really, neither makes sense when comparing iOS and Android. It only makes sense to compare all iOS devices and all Android devices (though a distinction between AOSP and subsequent forks, and true Android does make sense).

 

There are more Android devices than iOS devices: TRUE

iOS devices are more quickly updated than Android devices, in aggregate: TRUE

 

No need for cherry picking or distorting reality, they are simply two true facts. They are reality and neither one of those facts change whether you enjoy your specific phone or not.

 

Only fanboys care more about how they can parse an argument to describe reality than what is actually real. Limiting a discussion to just Nexus devices doesn't magically make Android better. It just ignores inconvenient aspects of what is true.

post #28 of 58

Yet carriers seem to love Android . . .    

post #29 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by xPad View Post

Nope. You can't just cherry pick which Android devices you want to compare with all iOS devices in order to win some arbitrary fanboy argument.

If fandroids are going to go around spouting "market share", then you have to take the good with the bad. Otherwise, if we're only supposed to compare iPhones and Nexuses, then that must carry over to market share as well, should it not?

But, really, neither makes sense when comparing iOS and Android. It only makes sense to compare all iOS devices and all Android devices (though a distinction between AOSP and subsequent forks, and true Android does make sense).

There are more Android devices than iOS devices: TRUE
iOS devices are more quickly updated than Android devices, in aggregate: TRUE

No need for cherry picking or distorting reality, they are simply two true facts. They are reality and neither one of those facts change whether you enjoy your specific phone or not.

Only fanboys care more about how they can parse an argument to describe reality than what is actually real. Limiting a discussion to just Nexus devices doesn't magically make Android better. It just ignores inconvenient aspects of what is true.

What is true is that the vast majority of people don't really care. Most people choose a phone by the look and features that they care about and could give 2 craps about timely updates.
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post #30 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post

Yet carriers seem to love Android . . .    

Of course they do. They’re going to prefer anyone that gives them some type of control.
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post #31 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by bloggerblog View Post
 

Google is likely working on a true mobile OS, unlike Android, that does not piggyback on Linux. It'll probably run all current apps in a virtualization mode similar to when OS9 ran on OSX, or how Android runs on top of Linux.

 

It's inevitable, it's also the only way they will be able to clean up their act.

 

 

Observation:

Android's Problem is the implementation of java, rather than going the iOS and WP route in bringing over the standard C languages(Even though Android has components written in C/C++) and Google's Apathy, not Linux. Open source is not the magical "I can't be held responsible for quality control" card Google seems to think it is.

 

OEM's like Samsung and HTC contributing little to no code and others such as Qualcomm and Imagination technologies being pissy with their documentation doesn't help(See: Nexus one, 4 and 7(2013) image issues ). Needless to say Android is pretty awful once you get past the top layers of the system. Only now it's become overtly obvious to me.

 

Also, your observations confuse me. Unless it's been edited since you posted this, the very first half of the first sentence of that page says:

"Android is an operating system based on the Linux kernel" even the kernel type mentions that it's modified linux.

post #32 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by sog35 View Post
 

 

Bottom line is companies like Google, Samsung, LG, ect don't give a shet about the customer experience.  All they care about is you buy their phones and see their ads.  After that you are on your own.  Personally I've been on an Android phone and tablet for 2 years.  This Oct I finally made the switch to iOS (5S/iPadAir/AppleTV) and the difference is night and day.

While I agree mostly with what you are saying, Apple should also partially be on that list too. They're a business out to make money just as much as the other companies... I'm sure they don't want people sitting on their phones for 4-5 years either.

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post #33 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post


What is true is that the vast majority of people don't really care. Most people choose a phone by the look and features that they care about and could give 2 craps about timely updates.

 

Maybe, maybe not. I don't know.

 

What I do know is that your response is a fanboy knee-jerk reaction. In light of one fact, a fanboy feels compelled to redirect it to something else.

 

The facts I listed are true. They are up to each person to consider for themselves. If I had to guess, though, I'd guess that most people would prefer timely updates. With iOS 7, most iPhone and iPad users I know (most are not tech savvy) knew about it and upgraded. I know very few people with Android who even know that Kit Kat is something to do with Android.

 

There may very well be some selection bias going on, but even accounting for that, I think it's fair to say that most Android users aren't very knowledgable on Android versions.

 

What that all means, I can't say. And to a certain extent, it doesn't mean anything much beyond what it means to each person involved. But you can't just ignore it because it could be taken to imply something negative about one platform or another.

post #34 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post

Yet carriers seem to love Android . . .    

Of course they do. They’re going to prefer anyone that gives them some type of control.
The carriers have made a stick for their own back. They fought like cat and dogs to have the iPhone and acceded all control to Apple to have it by the time they learnt their mistake it was too late. Apple had all the aces so when Google came along with android and said you can do what you like with only a few restrictions eg play store, maps, ads etc they jumped on the band wagon. For them it was the good old days bundling in their crap apps and gouging the Max revenue out of their customers and deciding if they want to allow their customers to upgrade the os or buy a new phone.
post #35 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by bloggerblog View Post
 

Observation:

Appleinsider, Google has managed to remove from Wikipedia references to the fact that the first Android demo looked liked BB and instead implied that Android, as it's known today, was developed in 2005. They also removed references to the fact that Android is a piggyback OS, much like Flash to a web-browser. The whole Wikipedia Android page reads like a commercial of heroism and conquest. Who has the Wiki credentials and good English to set some facts straight?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Android_(operating_system)

It is a weak point of the whole Wikipedia setup. Subjects like these are prone to be hijacked by companies as a part of their marketing (pro or con) and given Samsung's unethical history in social media (as I recall) it will be problematic to fight this.

 

Between which page releases were these edits made?

post #36 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post
 

Yet carriers seem to love Android . . .    

How else would Verizon push their paid VZ Navigator mapping app? They don't get to even bundle VZ navigator with iPhones, let alone set it as the default mapping app like on their Android devices to make a quick buck from uninformed customers. I'm sure the carriers would love Android even more if they could remove the ability to change default apps.

post #37 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by xPad View Post

Maybe, maybe not. I don't know.

What I do know is that your response is a fanboy knee-jerk reaction. In light of one fact, a fanboy feels compelled to redirect it to something else.

The facts I listed are true. They are up to each person to consider for themselves. If I had to guess, though, I'd guess that most people would prefer timely updates. With iOS 7, most iPhone and iPad users I know (most are not tech savvy) knew about it and upgraded. I know very few people with Android who even know that Kit Kat is something to do with Android.

There may very well be some selection bias going on, but even accounting for that, I think it's fair to say that most Android users aren't very knowledgable on Android versions.

What that all means, I can't say. And to a certain extent, it doesn't mean anything much beyond what it means to each person involved. But you can't just ignore it because it could be taken to imply something negative about one platform or another.

The real truth is not a knee jerk reaction nor is it fan boyism. The reason most people knew about iOS 7 is because it was all over the media and the update got pushed onto the device. How many would update if they had to read about it on a tech blog and then actively seek the update?
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post #38 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post

Yet carriers seem to love Android . . .    
Because of the control they have over it. They can shovel cheap, non-upgradable crap onto the marketplace pretty much forcing 2 year upgrade cycles. Anti-consumer. Of couse they love it.
post #39 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post

The real truth is not a knee jerk reaction nor is it fan boyism. The reason most people knew about iOS 7 is because it was all over the media and the update got pushed onto the device. How many would update if they had to read about it on a tech blog and then actively seek the update?
Why should users have to go through all that? The fact that you just beautifully underscored is that Apple makes it easy. Android users are left to the whims of the carriers.
post #40 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by denobin View Post

Why should users have to go through all that? The fact that you just beautifully underscored is that Apple makes it easy. Android users are left to the whims of the carriers.

Of they shouldn't and it's great that they don't but if left to fend for themselves most would not update nor even know a update exists.
"Few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example" Mark Twain
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
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"Few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example" Mark Twain
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
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  • HTC details how carriers, chipset makers stall & block Android OS updates
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