or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › General › General Discussion › NPD: Chromebook sales outperform MacBooks in commercial sector as iPad loses ground
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

NPD: Chromebook sales outperform MacBooks in commercial sector as iPad loses ground

post #1 of 210
Thread Starter 
According to a recent NPD report, Apple hardware took a hit in commercial sales during 2013 while Google's platforms rallied; the largest gainer being Chromebook, which outsold MacBooks five to one.

NPD
Source: NPD


From January to November 2013, research firm NPD saw a total of 14.4 million desktops, notebooks and tablets sold through U.S. commercial channels, representing a 25.4 percent jump from last year.

Overall, Apple's MacBook and iPad lines dipped in market share as competition from Google's Android and Chrome, as well as Microsoft's mobile Windows machines, picked up steam. Together, devices running Google's Chromebook and Android platforms accounted for 1.76 million units moving through the channel.

As noted by Computerworld the most dramatic change in the commercial channel was sales of laptops reconfigured with Google's Chrome OS. As seen in the above graph, so-called Chromebooks gobbled up 9.6 percent of the market from January to November, a massive 9.4 percent uptick from the same period in 2012.

Chromebooks took a commanding second place position behind stalwart Windows laptops, while previous No. 2 MacBooks dropped 0.8 percent to end November with 1.8 percent of the market.

From 0.1% in 2012, Chromebooks took 21% of all notebook sales -- 8% of all computer sales -- during the period from January to November 2013.Across product segments, Chromebooks accounted for 21 percent of all notebook sales and 8 percent of all computer and tablet sales during the period, up from one tenth of a percent in 2012, says NPD.

Chromebooks' usually low price of entry is a major draw for businesses looking to kit their staff with machines while staying under budget. With Chrome OS basically free to use, OEMs can keep complete system pricing low. The stripped-down platform does not require high-end internals to run, allowing manufacturers to further cut costs with low-resolution screens, low-end CPUs and other bargain-basement components. Chromebooks start as low as $199.

Despite the impressive gains, commercial sales are trending toward tablets, as seen by the drop in both desktop and laptop sales -- Chromebooks excluded -- and the rise of Android and Windows slates. Tablet sales accounted for more than 22 percent of all computing device sales in the commercial channel through November.

"The market for personal computing devices in commercial markets continues to shift and change," said NPD's vice president of industry analysis Stephen Baker. "New products like Chromebooks, and reimagined items like Windows tablets, are now supplementing the revitalization that iPads started in personal computing devices. It is no accident that we are seeing the fruits of this change in the commercial markets as business and institutional buyers exploit the flexibility inherent in the new range of choices now open to them."

Apple remained the clear leader in this segment with a 59 percent share, which translated to 15.8 percent of all personal computing device sales. That number is down 1.3 percent from last year. Android-based tablets climbed to 8.7 percent of all commercial sales, up from 4.2 percent in 2012. Microsoft's Windows tablets moved from 0.8 percent to 2.2 percent.

NPD


Finally, Apple retained the No. 3 spot in NPD's top personal computing device brands for the U.S. commercial channel with a 16.1 percent unit share, down from 17.9 percent in 2012. First place went to HP with a 30.4 percent unit share, while Lenovo finished second with a 23.3 percent share. Samsung came in third, jumping from a negligible 1.7 percent in 2012 to 10 percent this year. Due to overall market expansion, HP, Lenovo, Apple and Samsung showed positive year-over-year growth of 4.9 percent, 24 percent, 13.3 percent and 678 percent, respectively.

"Tepid Windows PC sales allowed brands with a focus on alternative form factors or operating systems, like Apple and Samsung, to capture significant share of a market traditionally dominated by Windows devices," Baker said. "Yet the Windows PC in commercial channels is clearly not dead, and its biggest brand proponents, HP and Lenovo, remain deeply committed to that product. However, as businesses upgrade from older machines and operating systems in the year ahead, the long-term trend is clearly towards greater hardware diversity, which all manufacturers will need to embrace in order to continue to grow."
post #2 of 210
As is common with statistics analysis you can find other sources that tend to dispute this one. Gruber (I can't remember if he's supposed to be trusted or not 1hmm.gif) cites StatCounter to question the Chromebook numbers, tho he doesn't dispute the good showing no matter which one is closer. (Thanks S." for the link)
melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
post #3 of 210
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

As is common with statistics analysis you can find other sources that tend to dispute this one. Gruber (I can't remember if he's supposed to be trusted or not 1hmm.gif) cites StatCounter to question the Chromebook numbers, tho he doesn't dispute the good showing no matter which one is closer. (Thanks S." for the link)

I don't think either NPD or StatCounter is lying but I do question how NPD was able to get their information about sales. At least with StatCounter it's clear it only refers to devices visiting their site.

People want to hate on Chromebook but I'd rather have one over a netbook running Win7 if I was someone needing a simple, cheap computer for surfing the web. Netbooks were a flash-in-the-pan but it was a huge flash that had everyone asking and expecting Apple to release a netbook (I think it was even asked at a stockholder meeting). I said then I thought netbooks made little sense but I do think Chromebook make sense.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply
post #4 of 210
The massive increase seems odd. And do businesses really restrict themselves to web apps?
I wanted dsadsa bit it was taken.
Reply
I wanted dsadsa bit it was taken.
Reply
post #5 of 210
And yet, I've never once seen a chrome book in the wild.

Not at any corporate meeting, not in any cafe, not in any studios, not anywhere...

iPads galore. And more apple laptops than any other.

Somehow, this "info" seems very flawed.

No corporation has use for a chrome book.
post #6 of 210
I agree, having never seen a Chromebook in the wild, I wonder where they are?

Regarding tablets, most corporate tablets are BYOD and would not show up from interviewing CIOs.
post #7 of 210
Quote:
Originally Posted by 9secondko View Post

And yet, I've never once seen a chrome book in the wild.

Not at any corporate meeting, not in any cafe, not in any studios, not anywhere...

iPads galore. And more apple laptops than any other.

Somehow, this "info" seems very flawed.

No corporation has use for a chrome book.

Not that my anecdotal observations at coffee shops are representative of the market — otherwise nearly all PCs would be Macs and the only thing you can do with them is Facebook 1tongue.gif — but I haven't seen any. I still see netbooks but those are being used by the homeless.
Edited by SolipsismX - 12/29/13 at 6:21pm

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply
post #8 of 210
Are Mikey Campbell's posts designed as a setup for DED? It seems all his stories are of the brain-dead "Apple is doomed" type that DED rails against. Seems Appleinsider needs to do a little housekeeping with their staff..
post #9 of 210

If Chromebooks does take off, I'd feel sorry for the HW manufacturers. The margins has gotta be miniscule.

post #10 of 210
I'm baffled. Is this April's fools? I've seen only one friend with a chromebook, and she hates it. It can't even connect to a network drive.
post #11 of 210
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

People want to hate on Chromebook but I'd rather have one over a netbook running Win7 if I was someone needing a simple, cheap computer for surfing the web. Netbooks were a flash-in-the-pan but it was a huge flash that had everyone asking and expecting Apple to release a netbook (I think it was even asked at a stockholder meeting). I said then I thought netbooks made little sense but I do think Chromebook make sense.
I'd take a netbook running windows 95 before id use a personal information tracker chromebook.

2012 27" iMac i7, 2010 27" iMac i7, 2011 Mac Mini i5
iPad Air, iPad Mini Retina, (2) iPhone 5S, iPod Touch 5
Time Capsule 5, (3) AirPort Express 2, (2) Apple TV 3

Reply

2012 27" iMac i7, 2010 27" iMac i7, 2011 Mac Mini i5
iPad Air, iPad Mini Retina, (2) iPhone 5S, iPod Touch 5
Time Capsule 5, (3) AirPort Express 2, (2) Apple TV 3

Reply
post #12 of 210
The other issue businesses should have with google docs is it is very very very unsafe. Once something is shared by somebody you have it until it is unshared ( and google docs tends to merge your accounts). I still have access to documents from previous companies. Nothing important but they are still there v
I wanted dsadsa bit it was taken.
Reply
I wanted dsadsa bit it was taken.
Reply
post #13 of 210
It's really odd how sales suddenly surged based on what was reported only last month. Most of the data is slanted one way or another. Take it all with a grain of salt. If ChromeBooks are setting the world on fire, the data will prove itself in 2014.

http://www.zdnet.com/latest-idc-figures-show-chromebooks-continue-to-struggle-7000023000/
post #14 of 210
Thank you for including "in commercial sector" in the headline.

The commercial sector is sales to businesses, government, education and other organizations.

MacRumors forgot to include that little nugget of information... and a shitstorm brewed over there.

Let's make this clear: In the total market... Chromebooks do NOT outsell Macbooks 5 to 1

Last quarter... Apple sold 4 million Macs... and I'd imagine a healthy amount of them were Macbooks.

In contrast... I've seen reports that Chromebooks only sold about 700,000 units last quarter.
post #15 of 210
Quote:
Originally Posted by 9secondko View Post

And yet, I've never once seen a chrome book in the wild.

Not at any corporate meeting, not in any cafe, not in any studios, not anywhere...

iPads galore. And more apple laptops than any other.

Somehow, this "info" seems very flawed.

No corporation has use for a chrome book.

Your experience mirror my own (although I’m from Canada and work in advertising, so that might influence things) - I’ve yet to even see one in person anywhere.

post #16 of 210
I've NEVER seen a Chromebook "in the wild" either. Ever. Where are they? Are we missing something?
post #17 of 210
Quote:
Originally Posted by 9secondko View Post

And yet, I've never once seen a chrome book in the wild.

As Chromebooks are (if I understand correctly) nearly completely dependent on the cloud, it's not surprising they'd not be seen in the wild. Absent someone using their phone as a wi-fi hotspot, or visiting a venue with wi-fi, Chromebooks would be stranded. I expect you might see more of them in homes and offices equipped with wi-fi.

post #18 of 210
There's no way those stats are accurate. I know a lot of computer savvy folks, and know only one person (me) who's had a chromebook,it was god awful and I gave it away.
post #19 of 210

A dirt-cheap netbook that sells well. 

 

Already saw this movie. Know how it ends, too.

post #20 of 210
Chrome books are perfect for schools. They are cheap, tightly integrated with the web, and come with basic app, mail and cloud storage for free. Many schools jumped on the iPad bandwagon, but began to realize that the iPad is a lot better for content consumption than content creation, and is very expensive compared to Chromebooks. So maybe that's who is buying Chromebooks.
post #21 of 210
Define "content creation" that schools would need.
post #22 of 210
Aren't Chromebooks being aggressively targeted at schools?

Which would explain why not many are seen around.
Better than my Bose, better than my Skullcandy's, listening to Mozart through my LeBron James limited edition PowerBeats by Dre is almost as good as my Sennheisers.
Reply
Better than my Bose, better than my Skullcandy's, listening to Mozart through my LeBron James limited edition PowerBeats by Dre is almost as good as my Sennheisers.
Reply
post #23 of 210

I suppose it needs to be said repeatedly, but this data excludes Apple's strongest three months of the year. How truly convenient. Indeed, the wonder is that iPads held the commanding lead they did, considering the last major revision prior to the iPad Air was at the beginning of March, 2011.

 

This is clearly doped data designed to eke out the last vestiges of PR for Apple's dead and dying competitors. And for that reason, don't expect to see a restatement of these numbers next month, after Apple drops the bomb on how many computers it sold over the last three months.

post #24 of 210
Here's the deal with Chromebooks: If you use the computer for web surfing, email, spreadsheets, word processing, social media, media viewing, or the things that mobile computers are used for 99% of the time, a Chromebook is just fine. If you need to run a specific piece of software that requires a windows or OSx computer, then you need a Windows or OSx computer.

My son had been pushing me to get a Chromebook Pixel for months, but I kept saying that I needed a computer that could run Windows apps. Finally he talked my wife into getting me the Chromebook Pixel for my birthday, and I have been using it daily since then. In the end I haven't yet found a legitimate case where I couldn't do what I wanted to do with the Chromebook. There is software that I don't run on my notebook, like PCB design or solidworks, but I wouldn't run that on a small notebook even if it was running Windows. In addition, just like a MAC, you can run windows or Linux on a Chromebook (at least on the Pixel), so you can run all Windows or Linux software.

As a sidenote; The Chromebook Pixel has the highest resolution display available on a notebook anywhere close to it's size (2560 x 1600), a touchscreen, and the best build quality I have ever seen on any notebook (including my family's several new Macbooks).
post #25 of 210
I have to agree with the anecdotal observations.

Not saying that just because I have NEVER seen one in the wild, that this info is bogus... But it does make me wonder, if it is true, where the hell are they?

I go to work, University, and frequent coffee shops and libraries. I have not seen a single Chromebook anywhere. Not t school, in the coffee shops, no one in Accounting, HR, Graphics, Development, Marketing Legal, Management, or IT. Not a single department. I have seen 1, maybe 2 Surfaces. I know plenty of people with big Android phones, Nexus pads, and non Apple devices (as well as the majority with Apples), know some people with Chromecast. But where are these Chromebook people hiding?
post #26 of 210
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post
A dirt-cheap netbook that sells well. 

 

Already saw this movie. Know how it ends, too.

 

Netbooks 2: Electric Googleoo!

“The only thing more insecure than Android is its userbase.” – Can’t Remember

Reply

“The only thing more insecure than Android is its userbase.” – Can’t Remember

Reply
post #27 of 210
I work at Best Buy and haven't set up a chrome book in 3 months, much less seen one bought. I have seen a few returned though.... Some people are interested in them until I tell them they can't use iTunes or office on it, then they quickly change their mind.
post #28 of 210

It surprises me about the Chromebooks, I thought most corporate IT departments were massive Microsoft advocates.

post #29 of 210
Quote:
Originally Posted by eckergus View Post

I've NEVER seen a Chromebook "in the wild" either. Ever. Where are they? Are we missing something?

There at the same place those 100,000,000 white box tablets are hiding. Somewhere between the Samsung suitcase with unmarked bills and Googles hoard of media moles who write anything that would cast Apple in a negative light.
post #30 of 210
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

As is common with statistics analysis you can find other sources that tend to dispute this one. Gruber (I can't remember if he's supposed to be trusted or not 1hmm.gif) cites StatCounter to question the Chromebook numbers, tho he doesn't dispute the good showing no matter which one is closer. (Thanks S." for the link)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

As is common with statistics analysis you can find other sources that tend to dispute this one. Gruber (I can't remember if he's supposed to be trusted or not 1hmm.gif) cites StatCounter to question the Chromebook numbers, tho he doesn't dispute the good showing no matter which one is closer. (Thanks S." for the link)
Gruber won't just parrot some blog or analyst's numbers as fact.
When talking about Chromebooks, he's just saying that pretty soon we should start seeing them appear in Web usage stats. Pretty logical if you ask me.
post #31 of 210
To clarify my previous post: Chromebooks are perfect for K-12 classrooms. Content creation in this domain means writing papers, working with spreadsheets, and creating presentations. While iPads can do all of these things, Chromebooks can do them more efficiently and are much less expensive. There is still a place for iPads in education, but I think they are best suited for unique uses, such as special Ed, or closely targeted activities, such as math drills.
post #32 of 210
Wtf. Why do they decide to include only Jan to Nov. At least cut of at a quarter end or year end. Everyone knows Dec is Apples strongest month. No coincidence this 'report' does not include December
post #33 of 210
Quote:
Originally Posted by Elroy6 View Post

To clarify my previous post: Chromebooks are perfect for K-12 classrooms. Content creation in this domain means writing papers, working with spreadsheets, and creating presentations. While iPads can do all of these things, Chromebooks can do them more efficiently and are much less expensive. There is still a place for iPads in education, but I think they are best suited for unique uses, such as special Ed, or closely targeted activities, such as math drills.

And what if wifi is down or you are out on a field trip? Not everyone has wifi at home either. what about software? It's basically a useless brick without wifi
post #34 of 210
Quote:
Originally Posted by sog35 View Post

And what if wifi is down or you are out on a field trip? Not everyone has wifi at home either. what about software? It's basically a useless brick without wifi

I don't know where you came up with the idea they can't be used without a wifi connection.. Read up on using Chromebooks off-line.
https://support.google.com/chromebook/answer/3214688?hl=en
melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
post #35 of 210
Sales numbers don't really matter, Android has told us that! What matters is how much profit is made, or even if a profit is being made. It tickles me how these analysts, journalist, researchers, and pundits couldn't pass a Business 101 class. I am not even sure they could run a profitable lemonade stand!
post #36 of 210

Chromebooks should be considered in separate product category from Macs and Windows PCs. Mac and PCs are devices you buy and own for the purpose of doing stuff, be it for fun or work. Chromebooks are Google's surveillance, data-mining, advertisement-delivery devices. That's the entire reason for their existence. In other words, their just like every other Google product or service.

 

I find it extraordinarily depressing that Google's sleazy business model has succeeded so wildly. It bothers me greatly that the vast majority of society isn't bothered by having a corporate behemoth track their every move and litter their existence with ads. You'd think at least techies would be appalled by it, but Google is the darling of the techie crowd. The success of this business model sets such a horrible precedent for the future of computing.

 

I sincerely hope there is always a company like Apple around that makes money the old fashion way: making computing products that people like me are willing to open our wallets and spend money on...products whose main purpose is not to be an electronic billboard.

post #37 of 210

I, personally, think the ChromeOS numbers are 100% fictitious and a complete lie. If they were really selling in these numbers, we would be seeing massive climbs in web usage of these things (remember, all a ChromeBook is little more than a web browser). Instead we wee ChromeOS holding about 0.35% of all web browsing in the US based on StatCounter.

 

What are all of these ChromeBooks doing? Not being used for sure.

post #38 of 210
Quote:
Originally Posted by 9secondko View Post

And yet, I've never once seen a chrome book in the wild.

Not at any corporate meeting, not in any cafe, not in any studios, not anywhere...

iPads galore. And more apple laptops than any other.

Somehow, this "info" seems very flawed.

No corporation has use for a chrome book.

I cannot speak for whether corporations have use from chrome books, but I do I agree that I have never seen one in use.

post #39 of 210
as the advert says when the lady ttys to sell her cromebook at pawn stars "it aint a real book id don't do windows and the money its worth might get you from vegas to reno or new york to hoboken. people shopping for presents aren't likely to spring for 3 i books for the kids so they cheap out and every kid gets something but like the man above says he hasn't seen one in public. its like picking up a date in a Hugo!
post #40 of 210
Quote:
Originally Posted by captbilly View Post

Here's the deal with Chromebooks: If you use the computer for web surfing, email, spreadsheets, word processing, social media, media viewing, or the things that mobile computers are used for 99% of the time, a Chromebook is just fine. If you need to run a specific piece of software that requires a windows or OSx computer, then you need a Windows or OSx computer.

My son had been pushing me to get a Chromebook Pixel for months, but I kept saying that I needed a computer that could run Windows apps. Finally he talked my wife into getting me the Chromebook Pixel for my birthday, and I have been using it daily since then. In the end I haven't yet found a legitimate case where I couldn't do what I wanted to do with the Chromebook. There is software that I don't run on my notebook, like PCB design or solidworks, but I wouldn't run that on a small notebook even if it was running Windows. In addition, just like a MAC, you can run windows or Linux on a Chromebook (at least on the Pixel), so you can run all Windows or Linux software.

As a sidenote; The Chromebook Pixel has the highest resolution display available on a notebook anywhere close to it's size (2560 x 1600), a touchscreen, and the best build quality I have ever seen on any notebook (including my family's several new Macbooks).

 

I did not realize that you could run windows on a pixel, and as for linux, I had read (admittedly, about a year ago) that linux did not support the high res display -- has this changed now?

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Discussion
AppleInsider › Forums › General › General Discussion › NPD: Chromebook sales outperform MacBooks in commercial sector as iPad loses ground