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NPD: Chromebook sales outperform MacBooks in commercial sector as iPad loses ground - Page 4

post #121 of 210

Apple couldn't care less how many $250 Chromebooks are sold as they don't compete in the low end markets. Let them have fun racing to the bottom!


Edited by rexbinary - 12/30/13 at 6:02pm
EDIT: I seldom post without an edit.
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EDIT: I seldom post without an edit.
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post #122 of 210
I'm not a "Mac guy" (though I used an original iPad for several years), but am more of a FOSS fan (using Ubuntu, Chrome, and Android at home, and SUSE with a Windows VM at work). Here's my perspective, for what it's worth.

I think Chromebooks appeal to three market segments. Principally they appeal to those on a limited budget - for $199 you get a "name brand" laptop (Samsung, Acer, Asus, HP) with a "name brand" platform (Google) that runs fast and doesn't degrade over time like Windows. They also appeal to those of us with heavy investments in the Google space - Gmail, Play, Drive, Chromecast, YouTube - in much the same way that iPhones and iPads appeal to those with heavy investments in iTunes and other Apple infrastructure. Finally, Linux enthusiasts find them (and Nexus devices) imminently hackable, as I can easily run Ubuntu *simultaneous* to ChromeOS, flipping between them with a hot key (identical kernel, don'tcha know), which is really cool IMHO.

I think more "normal" people value Chromebooks' instant configuration to the user. Anyone in our family, or indeed anyone I know, can log into my Chromebook, and it's "theirs" for a while - their apps, their data, their everything (ignoring the local SSD, of course). When I first logged into my Chromebook, all my apps and even my Chromecast were already there, ready to use. Very convenient after having to set up each Microsoft, Apple, Android, and Ubuntu device through the years.

I think from a vendor's perspective, Chromebooks have a very low market entry cost (no license agreements, full source code) and are ridiculously easy to tailor to specific markets. They are processor independent - Samsung's bestselling Chromebook is ARM-based, while my new Acer C720P with multi-touch screen and 32 GB SSD (only $299!) uses one of the new Intel mobile processors (9 hours on a charge actual, which is pretty sweet), and the vast Linux driver set provides tremendous flexibility in support chips and peripherals as well.

Google is targeting the mass market with Chromebooks - thin margin devices for all - while Apple targets the high end - generous margins on fewer top quality devices, but with greater overall profit. Apple's enviously high satisfaction ratings and rabidly loyal fan base makes this strategy profitable and sustainable for them in the long term, in my opinion, and I admire their resilience in not being sucked into a price war while still adapting to market trends (I'm thinking iPad Mini here in particular).

I enjoyed my iPad a lot, but when the choice came down to another iPad or a touch Chromebook for half the price, given my larger investment in Google's infrastructure than in Apple's, it was an easy choice. My brother went with an iPhone, and is delighted, and I continue to recommend Apple laptops and mobile devices without hesitation to those for whom they are suitable. I like having choices, and wish Apple and its fans all the best.
post #123 of 210
Given the recent revelations regarding the lack of credibility of these types of reports (http://appleinsider.com/articles/13/11/16/the-curious-case-of-idc-gartner-strategy-analytics-pc-phone-tablet-data-on-apple), I'm not even sure why these "reports" are reproduced anywhere but the gossip columns. And Chromebooks in enterprise? Even a casual review of Google's stated policies on privacy (hint: there is none) would seem to rule out the use of cloud apps by any company that wanted to maintain even a shred of data security. It's not adding up to me...
post #124 of 210
Several years ago, when Chromebook just came out, I had the doubt for its usefulness. Quick forward to now, there are 3 Chromebooks at my house: my wife uses one; my son uses one for his college work, and my daughter uses one for her high school work. They just love it. The price is right, the files are backed up automatically. Google Doc is good enough to handle routine needs, and surfing the net is fast. Most importantly, the price is right
post #125 of 210

I don't travel that much, but my last three trips, I've encountered several Chromebooks.

 

Don't see them in a cafe'? Well, let's stereotype for one second the types of people who buy Apple products and the types of people who spend any time at all in a cafe', or in a "studio."

post #126 of 210
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdriftmeyer View Post
 

FYI: The US commercial channel sales market, which includes resellers and distributors of computer products.

 

These `sales' are units shipped to these resellers and distributors and classified as sales final, when they are actually sales pending to an end consumer. In short, these are channel packings to prop up quarterlies and once they surpass the quarter and inventory of products aren't moving the distributor/reseller has an option to reduce the sale and/or ship back the merchandise with a small fee.

 

Those `units' statistics aren't worth spit. They never have been.

thanks for reminding us about how NPD plays its game. of course, NPD could also easily estimate the omitted Apple's direct sales stats too (they know total sales that Apple announces quarterly, and they can subtract their own third party same-period sales numbers from that to get a likely historic multiplier to apply to their latest reseller sales info).

 

but they don't. nor do they make any of this clear in their "reports." because NPD are really paid hacks hyping their clients' stats, and Apple doesn't ​bribe  contract for their services.

post #127 of 210
Quote:
Originally Posted by Timbit View Post

I work at Best Buy and haven't set up a chrome book in 3 months, much less seen one bought. I have seen a few returned though.... Some people are interested in them until I tell them they can't use iTunes or office on it, then they quickly change their mind.

Google doesn't count deactivations. 1wink.gif

The most popular Chromebook seems to be the Samsung 11" under $250. This is with an ARM processor.

For business use for basic admin work, this should be fine as it has an HDMI port for a display. Apple could build a MBA with their ARM chip too. The entry Air CPU cost $342 from Intel so $999 Air with 30% margins = $699 - $342 - amount for lower RAM ($70) - amount to go from 128GB SSD to 16GB ($50) + $70 ARM = $307 with 30% margins = $449.

While the Chromebook is still a good bit cheaper, the Air would run iOS and have the nicer trackpad and would hit a much larger volume of potential buyers than the $999 model.

But, the only real difference between it and an iPad is the keyboard/mouse and USB and the 11" iPad has an IPS Retina display. There's also the windowed UI that helps with multi-tasking productive environments but that could be worked around without compromising the full-screen UI.
post #128 of 210
Quote:
Originally Posted by NexusPhan View Post

That was enjoyable reading those comments.
Just to clear things up:
No, you don't need WiFi. You can do everything you normally would and it gets uploaded to the cloud next time you have a connection.
Many Chromebooks have the option for 4G built in with free data.
The new Haswell Chromebooks are really good. 10+ hours of battery. Cold boot time is 10 seconds. Blazing fast. Many of the sub $200, older Chrombooks are complete crap. Some of the newer ones have build quality as good as the MBA.
Touchscreens available.
I don't see any business use for them. That's obviously not what they were designed for. It's for education and a second household computer.

Keynote presentations are best done using a Chromecast or the HDMI out cable.

Auto updates in the background are great for the casual user.

They took the number 1 and number 3 spot in Amazon's top selling laptops of 2013. Get ready for them. 
Market share of these is going to skyrocket (more than it already has).

Excellent synopsis. I wish I knew how to invest in some part of this developing market.
post #129 of 210
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marvin View Post

Google doesn't count deactivations. 1wink.gif

There's actually no such thing.
Once activated, a device counts forever. Google will still be bragging about that horrible Samsung you got in 2008 in the year 3008.

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
Reply

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
Reply
post #130 of 210
Quote:
  I find it hard to believe that web apps on Chromebooks are going to have huge appeal unless the computer industry has changed drastically.

 

It changed drastically. Specifically, HTML 5, off-line app persistence, and incredible improvements in JavaScript performance and capability happened, such that web apps are now comparable to native for most classes of mobile applications. As a side benefit, they run on virtually any platform if written properly. Steve Jobs had the right idea (as usual), he was just 5 years ahead of web tech.

 

Quote:
 Question: If I have a spreadsheet online and get somewhere with no Internet connection, can I view and edit that spreadsheet if I did not save a copy locally?

 

Great question! The answer is yes *if* you are using the new Sheets version (currently opt-in only) - see  https://support.google.com/drive/answer/3541068?p=try_new_sheets&rd=1 for that and other new features. You can also create new spreadsheets while off-line, and they sync next time you connect.

 

This is true of most of the other newer apps, since Google introduced off-line capabilities for web apps earlier this year.

post #131 of 210
Quote:
Originally Posted by ricegf View Post

I'm not a "Mac guy" (though I used an original iPad for several years), but am more of a FOSS fan (using Ubuntu, Chrome, and Android at home, and SUSE with a Windows VM at work). Here's my perspective, for what it's worth.

I think Chromebooks appeal to three market segments. Principally they appeal to those on a limited budget - for $199 you get a "name brand" laptop (Samsung, Acer, Asus, HP) with a "name brand" platform (Google) that runs fast and doesn't degrade over time like Windows. They also appeal to those of us with heavy investments in the Google space - Gmail, Play, Drive, Chromecast, YouTube - in much the same way that iPhones and iPads appeal to those with heavy investments in iTunes and other Apple infrastructure. Finally, Linux enthusiasts find them (and Nexus devices) imminently hackable, as I can easily run Ubuntu *simultaneous* to ChromeOS, flipping between them with a hot key (identical kernel, don'tcha know), which is really cool IMHO.

I think more "normal" people value Chromebooks' instant configuration to the user. Anyone in our family, or indeed anyone I know, can log into my Chromebook, and it's "theirs" for a while - their apps, their data, their everything (ignoring the local SSD, of course). When I first logged into my Chromebook, all my apps and even my Chromecast were already there, ready to use. Very convenient after having to set up each Microsoft, Apple, Android, and Ubuntu device through the years.

I think from a vendor's perspective, Chromebooks have a very low market entry cost (no license agreements, full source code) and are ridiculously easy to tailor to specific markets. They are processor independent - Samsung's bestselling Chromebook is ARM-based, while my new Acer C720P with multi-touch screen and 32 GB SSD (only $299!) uses one of the new Intel mobile processors (9 hours on a charge actual, which is pretty sweet), and the vast Linux driver set provides tremendous flexibility in support chips and peripherals as well.

Google is targeting the mass market with Chromebooks - thin margin devices for all - while Apple targets the high end - generous margins on fewer top quality devices, but with greater overall profit. Apple's enviously high satisfaction ratings and rabidly loyal fan base makes this strategy profitable and sustainable for them in the long term, in my opinion, and I admire their resilience in not being sucked into a price war while still adapting to market trends (I'm thinking iPad Mini here in particular).

I enjoyed my iPad a lot, but when the choice came down to another iPad or a touch Chromebook for half the price, given my larger investment in Google's infrastructure than in Apple's, it was an easy choice. My brother went with an iPhone, and is delighted, and I continue to recommend Apple laptops and mobile devices without hesitation to those for whom they are suitable. I like having choices, and wish Apple and its fans all the best.

thanks for a rational analysis! 

 

of course budgets do matter in the mass market, especially for larger families. plus OS simplicity is always desirable too. and the trade-off of Google's massive data mining of their lives' data probably doesn't really trouble many (people are resigned to it  - "everyone does it"). so Chromebooks may very well take away a huge chunk of Windows laptop sales. like half - most of the consumer market, leaving only businesses still buying W7 laptops. and compared to an Android tablet at about the same price, the choice really comes down to prioritizing a keyboard vs. all the entertainment options tablets have.

 

Apple customers are certainly less budget sensitive for whatever reasons and clearly more serious about using apps and their ecosystem a lot. there is also the status symbol effect. which is why the NPD's story line about Chromebooks taking sales away from Apple - instead of Windows - is such BS (based on their intentionally incomplete Apple counting i note above). they are punishing Apple of for not paying their bribe contracting for their "research."

post #132 of 210

Get a few hundred shares of GOOG   ;)

post #133 of 210

years ago my screen name was maccat and i made the avatar  i was using fatcow as a web server and they sent my renewal notice for the domain to a non existent address and some Russians scooped the domain and set up a porn link . I miss that domain and screen name ! waahhhhh! 

post #134 of 210
Check today's episode of Mac OS Ken.

http://macosken.squarespace.com/listen-up/

He goes through all these numbers and shows how they are incomplete and misrepresented. It's too bad Apple Insider didn't give the same thought to them before blindly posting skewed, inaccurate data.
post #135 of 210
Quote:
Originally Posted by sog35 View Post

I'm sick of all this cheap trash google brings out. In a few months chromebooks will be Netbooks 2.0. My wish is Apple roll out a search engine to go head to head with Google and charge low rates for ads to erode Googles ad profits

Me too. Apple should have bought Yahoo months back when it was valued at about $20 bn.
post #136 of 210
Quote:
Originally Posted by marubeni View Post
 

You also get $1500 worth of google drive storage, which some people care about. A lot. So, don't be so quick to judge.

 

Since when a cloud storage is a valuable assets? Local storage will be forever more efficient (performance and cost wise) for working and archiving stuffs than having data stored thousand miles away from our computers.  I think there is more hype than real application to cloud storage services, for me Dropbox is the sweet spot for providing a free basic service that people mostly uses for sharing stuff, I'll never paid for a private online storage, my mac mini at home with back to my mac offers me much greater flexibility than a plain storage service. 

post #137 of 210
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigMac2 View Post
 

 

Since when a cloud storage is a valuable assets? Local storage will be forever more efficient (performance and cost wise) for working and archiving stuffs than having data stored thousand miles away from our computers.  I think there is more hype than real application to cloud storage services, for me Dropbox is the sweet spot for providing a free basic service that people mostly uses for sharing stuff, I'll never paid for a private online storage, my mac mini at home with back to my mac offers me much greater flexibility than a plain storage service. 

So, Netflix sucks, and you just have Blue Rays of all the Breaking Bad and Dexter seasons? Sounds awesome.

post #138 of 210
Quote:
Originally Posted by waterrockets View Post
 

So, Netflix sucks, and you just have Blue Rays of all the Breaking Bad and Dexter seasons? Sounds awesome.

 

Huh? How do you stretch your mind to compare a personal cloud storage like Dropbox or Google Drive with a media distributing service like Netflix?  For sure Netflix, iTunes, Steams and other online media stores has their purpose, but I'll will not archive my personal medias (docs, photos, videos) on the cloud only like the Chromebook required. 

post #139 of 210
Quote:
Originally Posted by sog35 View Post

And what if wifi is down or you are out on a field trip? Not everyone has wifi at home either. what about software? It's basically a useless brick without wifi

They typically have 3G or 4g. Mine had 3G with a few hundred megs of free 3G data for 2 years. This was several years ago when I got mine.
post #140 of 210
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigMac2 View Post
 

 

Since when a cloud storage is a valuable assets? Local storage will be forever more efficient (performance and cost wise) for working and archiving stuffs than having data stored thousand miles away from our computers.  I think there is more hype than real application to cloud storage services, for me Dropbox is the sweet spot for providing a free basic service that people mostly uses for sharing stuff, I'll never paid for a private online storage, my mac mini at home with back to my mac offers me much greater flexibility than a plain storage service. 

 

Yes, dear. Cloud storage (and the surrounding services stack) is only useful for people who have what they call "a clue". I am glad your setup makes you happy.

post #141 of 210
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigMac2 View Post
 

 

Huh? How do you stretch your mind to compare a personal cloud storage with a media distributing service?  For sure Netflix, iTunes, Steams and other online media stores has their purpose, but I'll will not archive my personal medias (docs, photos, videos) on the cloud only like the Chromebook required. 

Sorry for misinterpreting your post as a sweeping dismissal of cloud storage/services. You're talking about only your created works then? Certainly remote storage services are not appropriate for everything or everyone, but they are for most of the data that people use.

 

There is a lot of trouble around the term "cloud," with different definitions. Netflix and Spotify are cloud services, by any definition.

post #142 of 210
Quote:
Originally Posted by marubeni View Post
 

 

Yes, dear. Cloud storage (and the surrounding services stack) is only useful for people who have what they call "a clue". I am glad your setup makes you happy.

 

I was already doing "Cloud storage" with a private FTP server 15 years ago and I've seen many people since praising cloud backups and online storage until they as been confronts with how much painful it is to get back your data at such a slow connection when compared to local access.  Even with a 30mbps internet connection, it took multiple hours to copy 1Tb over the internet.  

 

Cloud storage works well for small files with intermittent access you need to share in collaborative work when you can't provide your own infrastructure which can be resume of using an old computer with a bunch of disk. 

post #143 of 210
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigMac2 View Post
 

 

I was already doing "Cloud storage" with a private FTP server 15 years ago and I've seen many people since praising cloud backups and online storage until they as been confronts with how much painful it is to get back your data at such a slow connection when compared to local access.  Even with a 30mbps internet connection, it took multiple hours to copy 1Tb over the internet.  

 

Cloud storage works well for small files with intermittent access you need to share in collaborative work when you can't provide your own infrastructure which can be resume of using an old computer with a bunch of disk. 

I disagree completely. I have multiple servers, and it is MUCH more convenient to use dropbox/google drive/SkyDrive to have the data instantly accessible from everwhere, backed-up automatically, easily shareable without giving people access to your machines, usable painlessly from mobile devices, easily hook-uppable to blog posts, presentations, and so on. And all this with 100% uptime. But of course, if you don't need this, you don't need this. I do, so I use it.

post #144 of 210
Quote:
Originally Posted by marubeni View Post
 

I disagree completely. I have multiple servers, and it is MUCH more convenient to use dropbox/google drive/SkyDrive to have the data instantly accessible from everwhere, backed-up automatically, easily shareable without giving people access to your machines, usable painlessly from mobile devices, easily hook-uppable to blog posts, presentations, and so on. And all this with 100% uptime. But of course, if you don't need this, you don't need this. I do, so I use it.

 

Beside the sharing aspect of it, which is nothing more than files synchronization and mirroring easily replaceable with some shell script (Dropbox is a bunch of PHP script himself), I said this is a good free service like Google search, but hardly an asset with big monetization, I wonder how much money Microsoft is making with there SkyDrive services.  

post #145 of 210
Quote:
Originally Posted by waterrockets View Post
 

There is a lot of trouble around the term "cloud," with different definitions. Netflix and Spotify are cloud services, by any definition.

 

I agree, the term "Cloud" is another buzz word for Internet.  

post #146 of 210

Movies can be made on Chrombooks using cloud editors. Files and photos can be stored in the cloud. They can be edited there too. Office productivity can be done in the cloud. This puts the needed horsepower in the cloud therefore the device in hand doesn't need to be powerful. I've been wanting to buy one for almost a month. The model I want is always out of stock because it is so popular. It has a Haswell chip and 4 GB RAM.

 

Read the reviews of Chromebooks. The only people who don't like them these days are misinformed people who expected to be able to run Microsux programs. Early adopters of Chrome OS are finding that their older Chromebooks now run faster because the software has been updated. Apps are being added all of the time. Now the touch screen models are coming out and they are being well received.

 

These are not the netbooks of the past. These are what netbooks should have been in the past. Long live Chrome OS. :)

post #147 of 210
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigMac2 View Post
 

 

Beside the sharing aspect of it, which is nothing more than files synchronization and mirroring easily replaceable with some shell script (Dropbox is a bunch of PHP script himself), I said this is a good free service like Google search, but hardly an asset with big monetization, I wonder how much money Microsoft is making with there SkyDrive services.  

 

Why do you care how much money MSFT is making? If you do, though, my guess is: A LOT, since SkyDrive  is an integral part of  Office 365, and Dropbox has a market value in several billion dollar range right now. Whether they do this with PHP scripts, rsync, or an army of OrangUtans in Bali is irrelevant (it is pretty clear, if you look at what it does, that it is none of the above,with possible exception of the OrangUtan theory, since it is doing quite sophisticated things.)

post #148 of 210
Quote:
Originally Posted by marubeni View Post
 

 

Why do you care how much money MSFT is making? If you do, though, my guess is: A LOT, since SkyDrive  is an integral part of  Office 365, and Dropbox has a market value in several billion dollar range right now. Whether they do this with PHP scripts, rsync, or an army of OrangUtans in Bali is irrelevant (it is pretty clear, if you look at what it does, that it is none of the above,with possible exception of the OrangUtan theory, since it is doing quite sophisticated things.)

 
You know Twitter is another several billion dollar business without any sane monetization, my point is when you are forced to offer a service for free like Dropbox, Skydrive and Google Drive offers it normally means they don't have a lots of interest from consumers.  Same apply for online office suite, Office 365, Google Docs or iWorks are all gimmick, apps made in a browser will never equal native apps.
post #149 of 210
Quote:
Originally Posted by Smallwheels View Post
 

Movies can be made on Chrombooks using cloud editors. Files and photos can be stored in the cloud. They can be edited there too. Office productivity can be done in the cloud. This puts the needed horsepower in the cloud therefore the device in hand doesn't need to be powerful. I've been wanting to buy one for almost a month. The model I want is always out of stock because it is so popular. It has a Haswell chip and 4 GB RAM.

 

Read the reviews of Chromebooks. The only people who don't like them these days are misinformed people who expected to be able to run Microsux programs. Early adopters of Chrome OS are finding that their older Chromebooks now run faster because the software has been updated. Apps are being added all of the time. Now the touch screen models are coming out and they are being well received.

 

These are not the netbooks of the past. These are what netbooks should have been in the past. Long live Chrome OS. :)

 

I hate when being able to doing stuff is enough, my interrogation is does it do better?  The so called cloud editors is better than other alternatives that already exist on Windows and Mac OS? I don't think so.  Do Chrome OS is a better OS than OSX, Windows or Linux? I don't think so either.  So what is the value of a more expensive laptop with fewer software option?

post #150 of 210
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigMac2 View Post
 

 

I hate when being able to doing stuff is enough, my interrogation is does it do better?  The so called cloud editors is better than other alternatives that already exist on Windows and Mac OS? I don't think so.  Do Chrome OS is a better OS than OSX, Windows or Linux? I don't think so either.  So what is the value of a more expensive laptop with fewer software option?

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by BigMac2 View Post
 

The Chromebook is much cheaper, the OS and the apps are always up to date, most of the processing is done in the cloud so you can carry around a much cheaper and lighter device. Some people don't find this useful, some do.

post #151 of 210
Quote:
Originally Posted by marubeni View Post
 

 

The Chromebook is much cheaper, the OS and the apps are always up to date, most of the processing is done in the cloud so you can carry around a much cheaper and lighter device. Some people don't find this useful, some do.

 

Sorry I was referring to the 1500$ pixel Chromebook which is way too limited for this price point.  For me a web browser and web apps is not enough, and without a real local storage, the Chromebook unfit for my needs.   I still wonder why Google maintain 2 OS, why if ChromeOS is so great they won't use it on phone? Same for Android, why they split their 2 OS apart? Why no ChromeOS tablet then? 

 

The Chrome OS is a solution looking for a problem


Edited by BigMac2 - 12/30/13 at 1:24pm
post #152 of 210
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

Impossible to play movies on a Chromebook? Someone shoulda told me before I did so. 1oyvey.gif

I don't think some of the commenters in this thread actually know much about Chromebooks and what they can and cannot do. Here's a link to a short Q&A for those curious about them.
https://support.google.com/chromebook/answer/3265094?hl=en

Maybe my comment wasn't clear enough. My friend wanted to send a local file to an always on networked drive so that her TV could access the movies. But there is no way to use a NAS on a Chromebook. So no movies.
post #153 of 210
Quote:
Originally Posted by sog35 View Post

And what if wifi is down or you are out on a field trip? Not everyone has wifi at home either. what about software? It's basically a useless brick without wifi
I hate how chrome books run nothing valuable, they are basically Internet only laptops(running a sucky internet browser to).

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

At least some netbooks could run Office and iTunes. lol.gif
Still horribly yet it's better than cheap.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jusephe View Post

Yes you control exactly what is installed on the device... Nothing.
Yep, it's all cloud, in other words any device sold that runs a Internet browser works better.

This is obviosly off, I have only seen 10 chrome books (at a school) out of the 1000s I've seen (about 70% Mac). There are many reasons why they are not used, those 10 I saw, they are being replaced be other net books, (and sometimes macs and iPads) do to they can't run a plug in, software of any descent.
post #154 of 210
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigMac2 View Post
 

I still wonder why Google maintain 2 OS, why if ChromeOS is so great they won't use it on phone? Same for Android, why they split their 2 OS apart? Why no ChromeOS tablet then? 

 

The Chrome OS is a solution looking for a problem

Is the "iOS" just a misspelling of "OS X" then? Surely Apple wouldn't also make this mistake for the last 6 years.

 

Touchscreen Chromebooks are essentially a ChromeOS tablet with a keyboard and trackpad, so we're not far away from that, but ChromeOS is targeting less expensive hardware than a Gorilla Glass multitouch screen interface. Running Android on a laptop would be about as natural as the Windows Metro interface on a laptop. Oh. Wait. We've already seen how that sucks.

 

In some ways, Android, Windows, and Mac can all run ChromeOS in the sense that they can run Chrome, which is 99.9% of ChromeOS.

post #155 of 210
Quote:
Originally Posted by dfstone View Post

Are you sure these are retail sales figures?

The data is from the "US Commercial Channel"

That is sales to businesses, government, education and other organizations.

It is NOT general consumer retail sales.
post #156 of 210
Why would any business want to keep details of their finances, product developments etc on a drive that Google can read?
Edited by Crosslad - 12/31/13 at 1:40am
post #157 of 210
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

Just guessing, but I think many people who spent $400 or more on an iPad or $1000+ on an Air would get just as much use from a $200 +/- Chromebook. I doubt most folks run Photoshop or Illustrator or even need to specifically use Microsoft Office on a tablet or laptop. If you do then a Chromebook isn't for you.

While Apple targets the higher-income consumer Google is trying to offer a solution that everyone can consider. So what Chromebooks may be able to do that those high-priced tablets and laptops cannot is make the internet and all it can offer available to a whole segment that otherwise might not be able to without significant sacrifice. How is that something bad?

For the price of a Chromebook, I think an Android tablet is of better value.
post #158 of 210
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigMac2 View Post
 

 

I hate when being able to doing stuff is enough, my interrogation is does it do better?  The so called cloud editors is better than other alternatives that already exist on Windows and Mac OS? I don't think so.  Do Chrome OS is a better OS than OSX, Windows or Linux? I don't think so either.  So what is the value of a more expensive laptop with fewer software option?


Guess what? Chrome OS apps are improving all of the time. Eventually they'll do things as good as native programs. Some already do. Chrome OS is based on Linux. There are numerous free programs for the Linux kernel. There will be just as many or more for Chrome OS in time.

 

Chrome OS is bringing us back to the time when we used a powerful mainframe with numerous terminals. Only this time we have the terminals in our homes or anywhere there is a good internet connection. The terminals don't need to be powerful. They just need to connect to the cloud servers. This means that as programs evolve and need more horsepower we won't really need to upgrade our Chromebooks. We'll let the cloud servers get replaced with faster processors. Our Chromebooks won't miss a beat.

post #159 of 210
Quote:
Originally Posted by Smallwheels View Post
 


Guess what? Chrome OS apps are improving all of the time. Eventually they'll do things as good as native programs. Some already do. Chrome OS is based on Linux. There are numerous free programs for the Linux kernel. There will be just as many or more for Chrome OS in time.

 

Chrome OS is bringing us back to the time when we used a powerful mainframe with numerous terminals. Only this time we have the terminals in our homes or anywhere there is a good internet connection. The terminals don't need to be powerful. They just need to connect to the cloud servers. This means that as programs evolve and need more horsepower we won't really need to upgrade our Chromebooks. We'll let the cloud servers get replaced with faster processors. Our Chromebooks won't miss a beat.

 

Firstly, interpreted apps will never be native, pure and simple. Secondly, the APIs will never be remotely as rich.

 

Thirdly, WebKit will never touch AppKit/Foundation Kit. Get over this fantasy. Finally, Mainframes were never `powerful.' They were centralized and overpriced.

post #160 of 210
Quote:
Originally Posted by Smallwheels View Post
 

Chrome OS is bringing us back to the time when we used a powerful mainframe with numerous terminals. Only this time we have the terminals in our homes or anywhere there is a good internet connection. The terminals don't need to be powerful. They just need to connect to the cloud servers. This means that as programs evolve and need more horsepower we won't really need to upgrade our Chromebooks. We'll let the cloud servers get replaced with faster processors. Our Chromebooks won't miss a beat.

I don't think this is the future. Yes historically there have been oscillations between having everything local vs having everything on the server and just having a dumb terminal. But we seem to be settling on a half-way point of having apps locally and documents on the server.

 

Things like cloud compute resources may be added to Grand Central Dispatch type APIs as a special kind of queue, not sure.

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