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post #201 of 210
Quote:
Originally Posted by waterrockets View Post
 

 

 

<sigh>

 

I've developed high performance Android apps to enterprise customers (augmented reality and custom mapping solutions with dynamically updated tiles). They were written in Java. You can go on about JIT vs VMs, but the point is that you can write Java code and have it perform well. One Game Developers Conference I attended, back in '97 had a keynote on Java in games. In a decade of game development (mostly console), I can tell you there is Java running there -- surely not in the core graphics and physics layer, but it's there.

 

You can download Play movies and watch them offline. But I'm the one who doesn't know what I'm talking about, right?

 

I've never purchase any media from Google Play, so I'll give you that I can't verify what I've claimed, but according to Google support the only way to watch a movie from a computer is thru a flash enabled web site.  On Android and iOS device they have a special player that gives you the feature to download the movies, I can't say this is a more DRM free store than the iTunes store.  My taught on DRM they screw the honest customer, so this is why I've never bought movie online and I still prefer having a physical and higher quality version on my beloved movies on disc, make me spend my money better. 

 

Most problem with VMs are connection with resources outside of the VM, graphical and user interaction are negatively impacted most of the time.   Most cross platform runtime can only hope about being as good as native apps, Its like saying because the amputated Oscar Pistorius can runs has fast as regulars sprint man, every one should go with artificial limbs.  JVM and cross-platform IDE are developers crutches…


Edited by BigMac2 - 1/2/14 at 8:22am
post #202 of 210
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigMac2 View Post
 

 

I've never purchase any media from Google Play, so I'll give you that I can't verify what I've claimed, but according to Google support the only way to watch a movie from a computer is thru a flash enabled web site.  On Android and iOS device they have a special player that gives you the feature to download the movies, I can't say this is a more DRM free store than the iTunes store.  My taught on DRM they screw the honest customer, so this is with I've never bought movie online and I still prefer having a physical and higher quality version on my beloved movies on disc, make me spend my money better. 

 

Most problem with VMs are connection with resources outside of the VM, graphical and user interaction are negatively impacted most of the time.   Most cross platform runtime can only hope about being as good as native apps, Its like saying because the amputated Oscar Pistorius can runs has fast as regulars sprint man, every one should go with artificial limbs.  JVM and cross-platform IDE are developers crutches…

 

Some help on Play and offline movies: https://support.google.com/googleplay/answer/2851696?hl=en

 

I agree wholeheartedly that DRM hurts the honest consumer. Nothing new there though.

 

Everything above pure assembler coding is a crutch. There's no arbitrary line anywhere. I've ported C, C++, Java, and C# all over the place. I'm language agnostic. One thing I've learned is that people like when you can develop stuff quickly. In college, one of my "customers" was my professor, and he was happy with a lunar lander game I produced in a week using C. Last week, my kids were happy that I could develop a lunar lander in Scratch in 20 minutes. Scratch is not fast, does not provide a great interface, but at least I can develop within my 8-year-old's attention span ;)

post #203 of 210
Quote:
Originally Posted by waterrockets View Post
 

 

Some help on Play and offline movies: https://support.google.com/googleplay/answer/2851696?hl=en

 

I agree wholeheartedly that DRM hurts the honest consumer. Nothing new there though.

 

Everything above pure assembler coding is a crutch. There's no arbitrary line anywhere. I've ported C, C++, Java, and C# all over the place. I'm language agnostic. One thing I've learned is that people like when you can develop stuff quickly. In college, one of my "customers" was my professor, and he was happy with a lunar lander game I produced in a week using C. Last week, my kids were happy that I could develop a lunar lander in Scratch in 20 minutes. Scratch is not fast, does not provide a great interface, but at least I can develop within my 8-year-old's attention span ;)

 

Thanks for the link, this is what I was referring to, It only offers offline playing on their proprietary Android or iOS apps, There is no way to keep the movie on a computer. 

 

I agree with you, and forgive me if can be a little stubborn some time.  From a developer stand point, I see how it make plenty of sense to choose the fastest route to get the jobs done. I'm not a professional programmer, I've done plenty of things in basic, logo, Pascal and C, and I do acknowledge own painful it is to maintain code of big software like Photoshop on multiple platform.  But from the users side, they will be better serve by a native apps carefully crafted and designed for the platform it target than having a one app served all approach. 

post #204 of 210
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigMac2 View Post
 

 

Thanks for the link, this is what I was referring to, It only offers offline playing on their proprietary Android or iOS apps, There is no way to keep the movie on a computer. 

 

I agree with you, and forgive me if can be a little stubborn some time.  From a developer stand point, I see how it make plenty of sense to choose the fastest route to get the jobs done. I'm not a professional programmer, I've done plenty of things in basic, logo, Pascal and C, and I do acknowledge own painful it is to maintain code of big software like Photoshop on multiple platform.  But from the users side, they will be better serve by a native apps carefully crafted and designed for the platform it target than having a one app served all approach. 

 

FWIW: I have no reason to store a movie on my computer. Granted, I can't archive a library on a mobile device, but for true offline viewing, I could download at home, and the kids can watch on one of their ipods or an ipad on a car trip, and I can cast it to my Chromecast at home. Your point is valid if you prefer to retain all of your media on personal storage of some sort. I'm moving away from that type of media consumption though, and finding fewer movies I'd like to watch again that I wouldn't pay $4 to do so.

post #205 of 210
Quote:
Originally Posted by waterrockets View Post
 

Your point is valid if you prefer to retain all of your media on personal storage of some sort. I'm moving away from that type of media consumption though, and finding fewer movies I'd like to watch again that I wouldn't pay $4 to do so.

 

Actually, I bail for a neat like software called Air Video HD, with that I put all my rips and download on a little server I can access from anywhere (inside and outside home) on all my devices and thru my Apple TV.  It even has ability to download content on a devices for offline viewing. 

 

I do share the same feelings of yours about newer movies….

post #206 of 210

 

marubeni quoted you in a post in NPD: Chromebook sales outperform MacBooks in commercial sector as iPad loses ground.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Sceptic 

In other news, toilet paper outsold engineering text books by 100 to 1

 

Most people find TP far more useful.

 

 

I'm sure you typed your reply on a toilet paper and not a engineered computing product. (TP also needs to be engineered btw). :-)

post #207 of 210
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigMac2 View Post

Actually, I bail for a neat like software called Air Video HD, with that I put all my rips and download on a little server I can access from anywhere (inside and outside home) on all my devices and thru my Apple TV.  It even has ability to download content on a devices for offline viewing. 

I do share the same feelings of yours about newer movies….

On a somewhat related note there's a story out today that Google is introducing VP9 next week, offering better 4K streaming for apps like YouTube. Unlike their VP8, this time they're coming in with support from partners like Sony, Broadcom, Intel, ARM, Panasonic, Sharp and other big players.
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post #208 of 210
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post


On a somewhat related note there's a story out today that Google is introducing VP9 next week, offering better 4K streaming for apps like YouTube. Unlike their VP8, this time they're coming in with support from partners like Sony, Broadcom, Intel, ARM, Panasonic, Sharp and other big players.

 

I don't know what Google is trying todo here, the intellectual property of VP8 has been a fiasco and prove inferior to the h.264 consortium. I much prefer having a standardized codec under control of a consortium assuring the interoperability between devices than using a third party format under control of one entity.  

post #209 of 210
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigMac2 View Post

I don't know what Google is trying todo here, the intellectual property of VP8 has been a fiasco and prove inferior to the h.264 consortium. I much prefer having a standardized codec under control of a consortium assuring the interoperability between devices than using a third party format under control of one entity.  

In reality there's no "h.264 consortium" making unified decisions. If there were then Nokia couldn't be going "lone wolf" and refusing to license Google their pertinent patents essential to the standard while the others came to a licensing arrangement with them. Then again there were some antitrust pressures at the time according to reports.
http://redmondmag.com/articles/2011/03/08/patent-group-underantitrust-scrutiny.aspx

Thinking about it Nokia's bit of trickery might be the reason Google appears to see quite a bit of success signing up hardware partners for VP9.
Edited by Gatorguy - 1/2/14 at 2:45pm
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post #210 of 210
They are inexpensive, fast and easy to use.
But somehow, if they aren't meant to impress idiots at Starbucks, then they must not exist!
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