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post #41 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dickprinter View Post



By "he" are you referring to Gene Munster (a/k/a Genius Munster to his peeps)? Is this the same guy (analyst) that has wrongly predicted a large-screen category-changing super-thin Apple-originated flat-screen TV…for the past 3 years?

Herman Munster.

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post #42 of 75

Quote:

Originally Posted by JONOROM View Post


Agreed. What actually distinguishes the iOS ecosystem is the long tail of tens of thousands of very high quality paid apps.

 

To me as an iOS user, this is still very important, plus the amounts of complaining I hear from Android users.

 

And the following two arguments are exactly what I was thinking and they make a valid point as for why the research may be invalid, but they are also based on the kind of wishful (snobist) thinking typical for me and quite a few iPhone users. 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sigma4Life View Post

App ratings are based purely on customer expectations. Given the preponderance of rubbish in the Google Play store it doesn't take a rocket scientist to understand that many android users have lower expectations for their apps.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by muppetry View Post
 

I thought it was the quality of the customers that distinguished the platforms.

post #43 of 75

"Equalized?"

 

It's not that there aren't a lot of great apps, it's that you have to research anything you might "test out" on your phone. Android did not avoid the "million plus" dupes of the same fart button app that Apple tried to police. And every other app could be a trojan and the "flash light app" you installed requires access to your addresses book.
 

Having an actual Android phone that is NOT one of the top tier, I don't install but a few apps and the experience is a bit sketchy. I could see that a business policy would be to lock down the phone.

post #44 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by vaporland View Post


Broken clock is right twice a day?

 

It's amazing he isn't an analyst for TV News. If you have a track record of less than 10% -- you are a shoe in as "TV Expert." They literally could not be worse (on average) if they made decisions by using darts on mad libs.

 

It seems that "expert" is another word for "paid marketer" in many cases.

 

 

*sigh*  I've got to find something to be more positive about -- that's two whiny comments about analysts and the quality of Android apps this morning. I don't want to add a "get off my lawn" to complete the picture. OK -- the number of analyst comments and the number of android apps is "way more" than last year. Is that positive?

post #45 of 75
Out of interest (and before the lynch mob arrives) which Android apps would you say are better and more intuitive than their iOS counterparts?
Edited by Crowley - 1/7/14 at 6:26am

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post #46 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crowley View Post


Wasn't that always the case? Anyone who relied on raw counts of apps to prove iOS's superiority was best ignored.

 

I always thought so, but there were a lot of those people. I think Jobs and Cook even made reference to the relative number of apps. 

 

Most apps that I've used on both systems are identical, but Carcassonne on iOS is way better than the Android version. I can't imagine why the company hired different developers. 

post #47 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by MathieuLLF View Post

I used to agree that Android apps weren't as good as iOS apps, but let me tell you that recently Android app developers have made leaps and bounds. Most Android apps are almost equivalent to the iOS counterparts and in some cases better and more intuitive. I have jumped ship from the iPhone (had every single iPhone since the 3G up to the 5S) to Android and frankly there's nothing that would motivate me to come back to the iPhone at this time.

My biggest gripes with iOS are the basic ones such as not being able to set a default email app or browser, etc... It's something so basic and would go a long way! I don't need to be told by Apple what I want as the default application for something. Third party keyboards would also be a nice to have feature. Swiftkey is a total godsend.

I realize that this is an Apple site so most people are going to be biased towards Apple products and I'm not trying to start a "iOS is better!" "NO Android is better!", but rather just stating that as much as I loved iOS it does have it's downfalls and that Android has pretty much caught up in app quality as well.

 

lol. This is confimation that Apple is still on top.  How much does Google/Samsung pay you per post?  My 12 year old cousin is looking for work.

post #48 of 75
The average Android customer/user demographic is quite different from the average iOS customer/user demographic.

This is why comparing ratings in the manner in which the article suggests is useless.

If I'm an Android user and I use X-app on Android and I'm impressed by it, my only basis for comparison will be other apps *in the Android ecosystem*. However, if I try that same app on iOS, I'll be blown away by that version. Most Android users will not be comparing apps platform to platform.
post #49 of 75
App parity...I'm not convinced that it's been fully realized, but it's coming.

What Analyst/Critics like Munster (not a fan) ALWAYS miss is the customer-service factor. Apple's (1) retail stores and (2) customer service philosophy is a killer advantage when considering the device life cycle.
post #50 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post

However, if I try that same app on iOS, I'll be blown away by that version. Most Android users will not be comparing apps platform to platform.

Have you tried apps on Android to make that claim? Because I have both iOS and Android devices in my household and there's really no discernable difference in apps. Some apps are missing a feature or two but nothing that really takes away from the overall experience. Now I will say that iOS has quite a few quality apps in which there is no Android version.
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post #51 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by LighteningKid View Post

Is this the one you're looking for? It sounded familiar to what you're saying here:

http://forums.appleinsider.com/t/159065/canalys-android-lacks-the-rigorously-managed-high-quality-optimized-apps-seen-on-apples-ipad#post_2380918

That's it, thanks for digging it up. I was on my iPhone and searching for old threads can be painful.

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post #52 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by MathieuLLF View Post

[blah] I have jumped ship from the iPhone (had every single iPhone since the 3G up to the 5S)
...

Smells like bullsh1t to me.
post #53 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post

Have you tried apps on Android to make that claim? Because I have both iOS and Android devices in my household and there's really no discernable difference in apps. Some apps are missing a feature or two but nothing that really takes away from the overall experience. Now I will say that iOS has quite a few quality apps in which there is no Android version.

Not even in loading, lag, or touching elements on screen when using iOS v Android? I've experienced and noticed that every time I've used an Android app I'm familiar with on iOS. Now one could say that it's not the 3rd-party developer's fault if Android OS or the HW vendor has its own issues but it does still effect the app experience since the app runs atop this OS and HW.

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post #54 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crowley View Post

Wasn't that always the case? Anyone who relied on raw counts of apps to prove iOS's superiority was best ignored.

Totally right. Just because Jaffray is linked to Apple doesn't make their analysis less nonsensical. Of course apps on iOS have always been better not because there are more but because...they are better.
post #55 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

Not even in loading, lag, or touching elements on screen when using iOS v Android? I've experienced and noticed that every time I've used an Android app I'm familiar with on iOS. Now one could say that it's not the 3rd-party developer's fault if Android OS or the HW vendor has its own issues but it does still effect the app experience since the app runs atop this OS and HW.

The lag and other factors are a permanent disadvantage in Android. As I recall, Apple has implemented touch at the core of their OS, whereas Android has not. It's possible they will never be able to do so because of key patents held by Apple.

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post #56 of 75
What reckless reporting%u2026the idea that iOS and Android have reached "app parity" simply because apps are rated similarly in their respective stores. It doesn't consider the real-word scenario that several of the apps people use every day are on iOS exclusively.
post #57 of 75
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post
As I recall, Apple has implemented touch at the core of their OS, whereas Android has not.

 

That’s what happens when you take a BlackBerry knockoff and turn it into an iPhone knockoff without any low-level work of your own. :lol:

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

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There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

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post #58 of 75

Sorry I do not buy it totally, I agree with one point he made, apps and how many iOS and android is no longer decision factor, it now expected and most users are not making a purchasing decision on how many apps there are or whether a particular app is available or works well on a platform. I use both platforms and I can tell you the reviews on Android apps tend to be useless, most with 4 or 5 star simple say works as expected or something similar, and the one with 1 or 2 stars usually is some person's rant or they found out it does not work on their version of the android phone they have.

 

This analysis also confirms much of what most everyone else has been saying for a long time, users of android tend to favor free apps, it is evident by the number of reviews, they get a free phone and then expect free apps, they also rate the free apps higher, why most likely because it was free, so expectations are very low. The mere fact it works probably gets a 4 or 5 stars.

post #59 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

Not even in loading, lag, or touching elements on screen when using iOS v Android? I've experienced and noticed that every time I've used an Android app I'm familiar with on iOS. Now one could say that it's not the 3rd-party developer's fault if Android OS or the HW vendor has its own issues but it does still effect the app experience since the app runs atop this OS and HW.

My GNex has no discernable lag, but my Nexus 7 is a laggy and buggy POS that I've given to my son (it actually plays games lag free, go figure) and replaced with a iPad mini. I have the same games on the the N7 and on a iPod Touch 4th gen, a few run laggy on the iPod but run smooth on the N7. I also have a easier time using AI mobile version on my GNex than the iOS app. I gave some serious consideration to getting a 5s but since I still have unlimited data with VZW and I can *cough* tether for free I didn't make the switch.
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post #60 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post

The lag and other factors are a permanent disadvantage in Android. As I recall, Apple has implemented touch at the core of their OS, whereas Android has not. It's possible they will never be able to do so because of key patents held by Apple.

I do really think that they'll one day abandon Android and go with a Chrome mobile OS.
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"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
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post #61 of 75
Munster's reasoning is flawed.

Yes, the rating numbers within each are similar, but those numbers are relative. Android users are comparing particular Android apps to other Android apps and Apple users are comparing particular Apple apps with other Apple apps. That says nothing about relative quality of apps on the two platforms.

--Michael W. Perry, author of Untangling Tolkien
post #62 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post

As I recall, Apple has implemented touch at the core of their OS, whereas Android has not.
What does this mean, exactly?

Not disputing it, just curious. Touch isn't a part of Mac OS X, which iOS is a child of, so how have they put touch at "the core"?

By "core" I'm assuming you mean something more substantive than APIs and events.

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post #63 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post

My GNex has no discernable lag, but my Nexus 7 is a laggy and buggy POS that I've given to my son (it actually plays games lag free, go figure) and replaced with a iPad mini. I have the same games on the the N7 and on a iPod Touch 4th gen, a few run laggy on the iPod but run smooth on the N7. I also have a easier time using AI mobile version on my GNex than the iOS app. I gave some serious consideration to getting a 5s but since I still have unlimited data with VZW and I can *cough* tether for free I didn't make the switch.

With the Nexus brands of the higher end Android-based models that is certainly more likely but when you consider how many of those are sold compared to the majority of Android devices — and let's keep it to those devices that are accessing Google Play, not all Android-based devices — I have to think the expectations of Android v iOS are allowing consumers to rate apps across each platform very differently, and unfairly when you do Munster's comparison.

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"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #64 of 75
I am an iPhone/MAC user, and I recently just bought a Tegra Note because I wanted a cheap tablet for reading. I can say that for all the apps I downloaded, when compared to their iOS equivalent, they are completely shitty. They lag, and they crash sometimes. I had been thinking iOS was boring but I really appreciated it even more after my encounter with Android apps.

My guess is the Android raters don't know any better. If they have the knowledge and experience of the responsiveness and reliability of iOS apps, they won't have given such high ratings to the android counterparts.

Let's forgive them 1smile.gif
post #65 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

With the Nexus brands of the higher end Android-based models that is certainly more likely but when you consider how many of those are sold compared to the majority of Android devices — and let's keep it to those devices that are accessing Google Play, not all Android-based devices — I have to think the expectations of Android v iOS are allowing consumers to rate apps across each platform very differently, and unfairly when you do Munster's comparison.

I agree, and do not take his reasoning into any serious consideration. I can't tell you how many times I've seen "does not work on so and so device(s)" warning from a dev on a app description yet people still try to use the app on one of those devices and will give the app a bad rating. Many apps also have those annoying 'rate me' pop ups that almost force someone to rate a app that they might not have. With just about everything I purchase I do some research and see what's being said outside of the reviews within the app description.

Btw speaking of iOS vs Android apps, I found a gem of a app called AllCast that allows Airplay like functionality from a Android device to just about any connected TV and media player including the ATV on the same network.
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"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
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post #66 of 75

I call BS on this article. I believe that Android can be fantastic and Google knows what they are doing, but most popular apps simply do not adopt their design guidelines. I complained about the subject on the Verge, and lots of folks agree with me.

 

http://www.theverge.com/2013/12/11/5199262/doubts-and-more-doubts-help-required

 

Twitter is bad on Android, Facebook Messenger looks like an iOS app (bad for android) and facebook is just ugly. 

 

post #67 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post


What about today? How do your top 5 apps fair across each platform?


edit: I just checked 1Password on each. It's has 3.5 stars from 3,158 ratings for Android and 4.0 stars from 3141 ratings for iOS. This is for all versions of iOS and I assume all versions for Android. It also has 5 stars for the current version of iOS from 429 ratings. I guess it's good to get some sort of comparison but I am having trouble seeing how any such measure could be relevant past a particular user's specific criteria.

 

I'm not sure that just checking the app you use on one platform is necessarily the best app on the other platform.  Flipboard is an example of an app that is.  I use KeePassDroid on Android.  There are much better looking apps like SafeInCloud (https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.safeincloud).  But KeePass is cross platform.  I can use it with a number of extensions along with PortableApps (http://portableapps.com/).  So KeePass is my password manager of choice.  And for browsers, it's lastpass.

 

In general, iOS apps used to look much (much) better than Android apps.  And I always found that Android apps provided superior user experience - mostly because of Android features (access to the file system, Intents, multi-tasking).  They also provided an inferior experience because of Android eg. jankiness in scrolling.  Much of this has changed since Android 4.0.  Android apps now not only look much better than they used to, I actually prefer them to iOS's skeuomorphic look (iOS7 of course changed that).  Jankiness in scrolling is greatly diminished and while not yet as silky smooth as iOS, the gap's narrowed considerably.  The strengths in user experience continues to be excellent and I think at the moment, for the most part, Android apps are (like the OS itself) superior to iOS apps.

 

Android phone apps always scaled much better than the raster scaling of iOS on tablets.  But that doesn't mean that they are optimized for tablets.  This is still the one area where iPad holds an edge.  Having said that, I personally have not found it to be  a problem with any tablet app that I have wanted to use.  The layout for tablet apps was best done by WebOS with the collapsible tri-pane layouts.  The mail app on WebOS ran circles around anything on iOS or Android.  I'm not sure why Matias Duarte hasn't introduced something like that yet in Android. 

post #68 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by DalShabet View Post
 

I gotta say, I find the frothing-at-the-mouth fanaticism displayed in this forum quite amusing. :)

 

We always aim to please. Now, perhaps, you could go back to amusing yourself, rather than cluttering up the forums with bold-faced trolling.

post #69 of 75
Number of paid apps > number of available apps.

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post #70 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

Not even in loading, lag, or touching elements on screen when using iOS v Android? I've experienced and noticed that every time I've used an Android app I'm familiar with on iOS. Now one could say that it's not the 3rd-party developer's fault if Android OS or the HW vendor has its own issues but it does still effect the app experience since the app runs atop this OS and HW.

The lag and other factors are a permanent disadvantage in Android. As I recall, Apple has implemented touch at the core of their OS, whereas Android has not. It's possible they will never be able to do so because of key patents held by Apple.

"Android. Something to lag about".
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post #71 of 75
Originally Posted by muppetry View Post

We always aim to please. Now, perhaps, you could go back to amusing yourself, rather than cluttering up the forums with bold-faced trolling.


It’s ConradJoe. Report him.

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

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Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

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post #72 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post
 
Originally Posted by muppetry View Post

We always aim to please. Now, perhaps, you could go back to amusing yourself, rather than cluttering up the forums with bold-faced trolling.


It’s ConradJoe. Report him.

 

Interesting. I thought he had moved on.

post #73 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by MathieuLLF View Post

I used to agree that Android apps weren't as good as iOS apps, but let me tell you that recently Android app developers have made leaps and bounds. Most Android apps are almost equivalent to the iOS counterparts and in some cases better and more intuitive. I have jumped ship from the iPhone (had every single iPhone since the 3G up to the 5S) to Android and frankly there's nothing that would motivate me to come back to the iPhone at this time.

My biggest gripes with iOS are the basic ones such as not being able to set a default email app or browser, etc... It's something so basic and would go a long way! I don't need to be told by Apple what I want as the default application for something. Third party keyboards would also be a nice to have feature. Swiftkey is a total godsend.

I realize that this is an Apple site so most people are going to be biased towards Apple products and I'm not trying to start a "iOS is better!" "NO Android is better!", but rather just stating that as much as I loved iOS it does have it's downfalls and that Android has pretty much caught up in app quality as well.

If you've jumped ship to Android, how do you know that it's almost caught up to iOS?
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post #74 of 75
Originally Posted by MathieuLLF View Post
I had the iPhone 5S up until the Nexus 5 came out...

 

And then a disgruntled Android user stole your iPhone in retribution.

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

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Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

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post #75 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by MathieuLLF View Post

I had the iPhone 5S up until the Nexus 5 came out...

Smells like BS since the 5S just came out and if you really wanted a Nexus you would've waited.
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