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Apple to take 11% of global enterprise market by 2015 thanks to iPhone 'halo effect'

post #1 of 26
Thread Starter 
Apple's share of the business market is steadily growing, with increased adoption rates for Macs and iPads spurred on by "halo devices" like the iPhone, new research shows.

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According to a study conducted by Forrester Research, Apple products accounted for roughly eight percent of global business and government spending in 2012, up from only one percent in 2009, reports The Wall Street Journal. The research firm expects the uptick to hit 11 percent in 2015.

More impressive is that Forrester's numbers don't include the iPhone, which is widely viewed as a gateway for business to jump into Apple's iOS and OS X ecosystems under so-called "bring your own device" policies.

As an example, the publication highlighted Cisco Systems' relatively quick migration to Apple's iOS platform after instituting a BYOD policy in 2009. With employees footing the bill for their own phones and tablets, and the company covering wireless fees in special cases, iPhones and iPads account for almost three quarters of Cisco's 70,000 registered devices.

While Windows machines are still dominant at Cisco, the company has furnished its workers with 35,000 MacBooks, or about one quarter of all supported laptops. Before the BYOD initiative, businesses were reticent to purchase Macs over PCs due to higher initial cost. According to one Cisco senior vice president, with repair and support, the end cost evens out in the end.

Also a factor are apps, the report says. Cisco, for example, takes advantage of Apple's Developer Program to roll out its own in-house apps for employees.

In addition, Apple is making strides in security and encryption that make both iOS and OS X a viable and attractive option for government agencies.

With the advent of BYOD, the rise of portables and "halo" devices like the iPhone penetrating deep into the consumer market, enterprise and government may have no choice but to move in Apple's direction.
post #2 of 26

But Apple can never succeed in enterprise!

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone exists], it doesn’t deserve to.
Reply

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone exists], it doesn’t deserve to.
Reply
post #3 of 26
There no growth any more!!! /s
post #4 of 26
I'd love to see Apple take another swing at Enterprise, and this time give MS a run for its money.
bb
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bb
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post #5 of 26
What are all those companies going to do with those MS techs no longer needed to image PCs?
post #6 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by bloggerblog View Post

I'd love to see Apple take another swing at Enterprise, and this time give MS a run for its money.

 

If you've been waiting to see another swing, look again.  It's called encirclement, a proven, time-honored strategy for overwhelming your opponent without their realizing it until it's too late.

post #7 of 26
That's great for Apple. The stock will be down tomorrow. /s
post #8 of 26
Is this talking about actual Windows machines or Windows Embedded devices?
post #9 of 26
Eleven percent, globally? And they're not even trying!

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
Reply
post #10 of 26

Oh Yeah!!! Well Microsoft developed the Surface of Halo

Help! I'm trapped in a white dungeon of amazing precision and impeccable tolerances!

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Help! I'm trapped in a white dungeon of amazing precision and impeccable tolerances!

Reply
post #11 of 26
Quote:
Apple's share of the business market is steadily growing, with increased adoption rates for Macs and iPads spurred on by "halo devices" like the iPhone, new research shows.

According to a study conducted by Forrester Research, Apple products accounted for roughly eight percent of global business and government spending in 2012, up from only one percent in 2009, reports The Wall Street Journal. The research firm expects the uptick to hit 11 percent in 2015.

More impressive is that Forrester's numbers don't include the iPhone, which is widely viewed as a gateway for business to jump into Apple's iOS and OS X ecosystems under so-called "bring your own device" policies.

This is an incredible number of iDevices in business & government that are not running Microsoft Office . . . Once enterprise realizes that MS Office is not needed for everyone in the company, there will be no going back . . . the tipping point is only at 17% or less.

MS Office is possibly losing it's absolute "standard" in enterprise during this time Microsoft was absent from the cell phone and tablet business... they may also realize that they more then "got behind a couple iterations" as Ballmer once put it,, they left the door open for someone (Apple) to get a foothold, then a toe hold, and maybe even more. That this occurred during a time when tablets were replacing desktop PCs made their absence all the more dreadful.
"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
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"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
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post #12 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Emes View Post

Is this talking about actual Windows machines or Windows Embedded devices?

I doubt windows embedded devices would be counted any more then Linix embedded devices would be.
"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
Reply
"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
Reply
post #13 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by tundraboy View Post

If you've been waiting to see another swing, look again.  It's called encirclement, a proven, time-honored strategy for overwhelming your opponent without their realizing it until it's too late.

I agree with that. Fortunately Microsoft hasn't been aware of what's been happening for at least 10 out of the last 13 years Ballmer's been CEO. In another century he'd have been the captain of a large ocean liner speeding through a field of icebergs.
"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
Reply
"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
Reply
post #14 of 26
Apple stock has been on a upward trend since middle of September it has rolled up and down from support to resistance 3 times with higher lows and higher highs it has just broken below its support level Mac d bars indicate massive institutional selling which look to decelerate in a few weeks indicating they will start with inflows again. The RSI is neutral at about 42 and moving averages indicate a bit more weakness. This all suggests a sideway roll for a few months up and down between about support of 530 up to around 580 resistance. Earnings are coming up so depending on profits and guidance that will either drive stock forward or not. Could do an earnings play and buy at current weakness and sell before earnings then wait for next trend to indicate forward strategy. Need some patience right now with it otherwise could get burned on any overbought stochastics
post #15 of 26

So we never get Apple market share figures outside of the US but now we have an accurate forecast of the spending intentions of 'Global' enterprise?

 

I am skeptical.

post #16 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by cnocbui View Post

I am skeptical.

Aren't you always whenever it involves anything positive to do with Apple?
post #17 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

But Apple can never succeed in enterprise!

This would never have happened if Steve Ballmer was still alive.
post #18 of 26
It is pretty damning of Microsoft and Wintel when so many at companies such as Cisco will buy an 'expensive' Mac themselves for work. Imagine the numbers if the companies offered them free Macs in the first place!
Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
nMac Pro 6 Core, MacBookPro i7, MacBookPro i5, iPhones 5 and 5s, iPad Air, 2013 Mac mini, SE30, IIFx, Towers; G4 & G3.
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Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
nMac Pro 6 Core, MacBookPro i7, MacBookPro i5, iPhones 5 and 5s, iPad Air, 2013 Mac mini, SE30, IIFx, Towers; G4 & G3.
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post #19 of 26
This is why M$ are pushing Office365 so heavily. The client I'm working for is at the back-end of migrating around 2500 users worldwide to O365, which effectively locks them into the M$ ecosystem but they're doing it as they were offered something like $9 per user per month, including MS Office (whilst they were on Office 2000).

Hopefully the "free" productivity apps should help Apple push back a bit...
post #20 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by tundraboy View Post
 

 

If you've been waiting to see another swing, look again.  It's called encirclement, a proven, time-honored strategy for overwhelming your opponent without their realizing it until it's too late.

 

Or perhaps even just by osmosis - far easier to stand back and let your products be brought into a company because people there WANT your devices, which has effectively zero cast - that to spend massive amounts of money trying to force, uh I mean market, your way in. 

post #21 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by pjapk View Post

This is why M$ are pushing Office365 so heavily. The client I'm working for is at the back-end of migrating around 2500 users worldwide to O365, which effectively locks them into the M$ ecosystem but they're doing it as they were offered something like $9 per user per month, including MS Office (whilst they were on Office 2000).

Hopefully the "free" productivity apps should help Apple push back a bit...

I think O365 will lock messaging into the M$ecosystem, but where I am looking at 'next gen' corporations will be:

A. outsourcing messaging

B. Building Virtual Desktops for legacy apps

C. BYOD

D. Building mobile apps for everything new.

 

As soon B happens, Windows goes the way of the 3270emulator.  As soon as A and C gain momentum, The rest of M$ enterprise is 'just another middleware'  and D will cause businesses to look at what people are buying (and what fits securely [and security will be a big requirement] and deploy the mobile apps on that platform, and force the rest to use the 'legacy' interface.

 

Effectively,  If Apple can build an effective consumer platform with security built in, Businesses will have to accept it.  

 

And Microsoft, to survive in the mobile world, will have to support mobile client apps for iOS, since the only thing they will be making money in the enterprise is identity management (Azure).

 

Again, it's not google or microsoft that Apple needs to compete against... It's Samsung and Amazon.   Who will define the 'secure consumer mobile experience' will own the corpororate interface.

 

Hence this is why TouchID and the custom security vault inside the Ax hardware is a critical technology, as that transcends to a critical identity issue that addresses the business and consumer requirements at the primary intersection.

post #22 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Macky the Macky View Post


I agree with that. Fortunately Microsoft hasn't been aware of what's been happening for at least 10 out of the last 13 years Ballmer's been CEO. In another century he'd have been the captain of a large ocean liner speeding through a field of icebergs.

 

Icebergs are too benign, more like a British oil tanker amid a wolf pack of U-boats.

post #23 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by pjapk View Post

This is why M$ are pushing Office365 so heavily. The client I'm working for is at the back-end of migrating around 2500 users worldwide to O365, which effectively locks them into the M$ ecosystem but they're doing it as they were offered something like $9 per user per month, including MS Office (whilst they were on Office 2000).

Hopefully the "free" productivity apps should help Apple push back a bit...

 

And the Office push might be too late.  MS should have been pushing an "Office Everywhere" strategy since day one of iPhone OS.  Instead, it pushed a Windows Everywhere strategy which is obviously failing, and subordinated the Office Suite to that goal which is in danger of dragging MS Office down along with Windows.  They thought it was a great victory when they were able to avoid Judge Penfield Jackson's antitrust remedy of breaking MS into separate OS and apps companies.  I would venture that those two unborn daughter companies with be a lot healthier today than MS if the break up went ahead.

 

Now how were they able to get the DoJ to ease up on them back then?  Why, despite Bill Gates' own personal beliefs, he supported Dubya's candidacy, I bet because of a wink and a nod about how a Bush DoJ would handle the ongoing antitrust case.  Heck, MS even set up their own PAC to support Bush.  Karma may be a long time coming, but it will come.  It has come.

post #24 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by GTR View Post

This would never have happened if Steve Ballmer was still alive.

I had to read that twice ... Good one ... 1biggrin.gif
Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
nMac Pro 6 Core, MacBookPro i7, MacBookPro i5, iPhones 5 and 5s, iPad Air, 2013 Mac mini, SE30, IIFx, Towers; G4 & G3.
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Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
nMac Pro 6 Core, MacBookPro i7, MacBookPro i5, iPhones 5 and 5s, iPad Air, 2013 Mac mini, SE30, IIFx, Towers; G4 & G3.
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post #25 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by rob53 View Post

What are all those companies going to do with those MS techs no longer needed to image PCs?

 

You mean all those geniuses with their MCSE certificates they got from ITT Tech?

post #26 of 26
Apps are really key to Cisco's success.

Quote:

Also a factor are apps, the report says. Cisco, for example, takes advantage of Apple's Developer Program to roll out its own in-house apps for employees.

In order to achieve real success, however, Cisco also needed a way to get adoption of their apps via an in-house enterprise app store called the "App Fridge".

Some of the keys to getting an ROI out of their apps are highlighted in a Forbes article "Cisco's Lessons for Mobile App Empowerment" (http://www.forbes.com/sites/danwoods/2013/12/04/ciscos-lessons-for-mobile-app-empowerment/2/) and in a case on how Cisco provided their global field sales organization with mobile access (http://www.apperian.com/cisco-customer-spotlight/).
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