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Google buys Nest Labs, maker of smart thermostat, for $3.2 billion [u] - Page 8

post #281 of 339
A little disappointed, home automation has the potential to be huge I think. Apple should really have purchased Nest when they had the chance.
post #282 of 339
Quote:
Originally Posted by scalpernt View Post

Google having granular insight into what the market wants via search queries is going to eventually give them an advantage that Apple should definitely be worried about. In fact, I would be willing to bet that Google has been using search data in all of their strategic decisions and this has helped them make the gains they have with Android as well as other initiatives.

 

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by JamesMac View Post
 

 

That's a very interesting observation.  I would have thought that Google Trends being publicly available would eliminate such an advantage.  Can you expand on exactly what your thoughts were?   I've seen some very clever people using Google Trends to make some accurate projections, but it never dawned on me that Google themselves could be gaining competitive advantage.

 

Well, admittedly I've never used Google Trends myself but I imagine that it's the dummies version of the type of data that's available to Google.  Or at the very least there's a time delay between when they publish the data and when it's available to them.  For example, they could track the exact number of Boston iPhone users that are in the home renovation field researching Nest products via google and when it spikes higher they could be alerted.  Or how many iPhone/Mac users were searching for alternative mail apps like Sparrow, or that Waze was the most often searched for app during the Apple maps fiasco.  Or even what the most searched "iPhone annoyance" is and use it in the development of their next Android revision as well as for their next marketing campaign.  Also, with their ability to peer into people's gmail accounts they might even have knowledge of competitors strategic moves via employees carelessly using a Gmail account.  I'm sure we could come up with even more scary stuff that they could easily know.

 

The point is that eventually (maybe 10 years from now or maybe 2) this is going to become too powerful to be dealt with by any competitor.  It's like going to war with someone where you can only see the small battlefield in front of you while they have a top down view of the whole battlefield.  I hope this concept has dawned on Apple brass and they have a strategy in place to outflank Google.  I can't say that it seems likely though.

post #283 of 339
Quote:
Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post

I disagree, it wasn’t as big as a risk that it's been made out to be. It was a phone that had a already highly successful product (iPod) built in. Many people were carrying around a cell phone plus a iPod, creating a device with both into one device that worked well (Motorola failed in their attempt) was a fairly safe thing to try.

This was Apple's first attempt at cell phones. Other manus were integrating music in to their own cell phones. If Apple failed, the others would slowly eat away at the iPod. If Apple failed, there would be no iPad. There would be no Apple.
post #284 of 339
Quote:
Originally Posted by scalpernt View Post


The point is that eventually (maybe 10 years from now or maybe 2) this is going to become too powerful to be dealt with by any competitor.  It's like going to war with someone where you can only see the small battlefield in front of you while they have a top down view of the whole battlefield.  I hope this concept has dawned on Apple brass and they have a strategy in place to outflank Google.  I can't say that it seems likely though.

Yup, for the next 10 years, Apple will release nothing and buy no one. Apple knows what it's doing.
post #285 of 339
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1983 View Post

A little disappointed, home automation has the potential to be huge I think. Apple should really have purchased Nest when they had the chance.
Why can't Apple make something as good as Nest? Do they have to buy a stand alone product to get into home automation? Surely Apple designers could easily design a sleek looking thermostat. Unless Nest has some killer patents I'm not sure why Apple would want them. Apple's weakness certainly isn't hardware design.
post #286 of 339
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post


Kudos for your well thought-out and detailed post addressing many questions. Seriously.

But the essence of your response to me regarding Google's strategy is that it is swamping us (or at least, trying to, since it has not gotten anywhere yet) with a 'cheap bastards' approach (I am quoting you).

That may very well be the case, although I'll believe it when something actually sticks. But we know that'll never be Apple's strategy. And it is unclear how that will make money for Google.

I agree - and my post is more along the "trying to" line.  Google's not going to own all of these emerging industries (one can hope at least - "wouldn't be prudent" - to quote Dubya's Dad). 

Nor have I looked into GOOG's financials to see if blowing all the resources they're spreading around into so many initiatives makes business sense at the present, and I absolutely have no insight into predicting the growth and adoption rates into any of 'em beyond the current Android/Chrome/Play Store/Search/digital ecosystem areas really.

So my point is mainly that anyone who thinks they're just taking wild stabs in the dark doesn't recognize that they have cohesive and certainly expansive ideas (with effort behind them) about where they're heading. 

 

Sometimes in direct competition with Apple, MS, Amazon, facebook, Yahoo, etc. in some of the bread and butter areas of all of 'em - and also in other areas that are still nascent and out of the wheelhouses of those companies.

 

And that they're more dynamic and - if one can step out of whatever rooting interest one may have - at this juncture when previous paradigms and pecking orders are in rapid flux - just plain more interesting to watch than at least all but one of the above as the future of tech barrels toward us.

And that no one can say they're not into "the vision thing." 


Edited by bigpics - 1/14/14 at 1:04pm

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post #287 of 339
Quote:
Originally Posted by jungmark View Post

This was Apple's first attempt at cell phones. Other manus were integrating music in to their own cell phones. If Apple failed, the others would slowly eat away at the iPod. If Apple failed, there would be no iPad. There would be no Apple.

Again, other manufacturers were doing a piss poor job of integrating a music player. The iPod at that point was already 6-7 years old? Millions had already put their entire music library into iTunes. Getting the iPod part right was paramount in the success of the iPhone and the phone part second.
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post #288 of 339
Quote:
Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post


Philips makes many medical electronics, and they also make cordless phones.

 

 

Philips is a huge company, but what did the Mobile electronics group do, especially in the pre-iPod days?

post #289 of 339
Hmm...so apparently Nest products are designed by a 3rd party firm called Bould.

http://www.bould.com/jsindex.php

Guess Google didn't buy Nest for Fadell's design saavy.
post #290 of 339

Nest owes a lot of it's attention to the fact that Fadell and Rogers were ex Apple Execs.   If they don't have that as a marketing piece the road they travel becomes much harder. 

 

Nests technology is great but don't fool yourself into thinking that there isn't competition. 

 

Netatmo Therm -  Neatly ties in to their weather station 

 

Centralite Pearl Therm -  Will be using Zigbee Home Automation 1.2 

 

Tado Therm - UK's best shot at a Nest competitor 

 

Honeywell Prestige Therm - Can't count these guys out 

 

Allure Energy Eversense Therm - supports iBeacon/NFC modules for the room.  

 

Apple doesn't need to pay a billion dollars for product they don't need.   Apple's likely not going to play the hardware 

game.   If I'm a betting man I'd say that they will align with either Zigbee or Z Wave or both.   They will probably abstract 

them enough to add some proprietary features for OS X/iOS in an Apple Framework for devs to write against that ads a 

bit more Wow Factor than what Zigbee or Z Wave provides. 

 

If Apple were to acquire a company it'd probably be Polish based Fibaro.  Their product design is more Apple than anyone. 

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post #291 of 339

I installed a Nest thermostat in my condo.  Liked it so much that I gifted my brother one for his condo and installed another one at my parents.

 

They are awesome devices.

 

And this was one company whose IPO I was eagerly waiting for.  Too bad.  Kudos on Google for seeing their potential.  And the integration they could pull off will be phenomenal.  I can imagine Google Now  using the Nest's data and my location data to determine when it should turn on the heat in the winter.  Or "vacation mode" when it knows I'm out of the country (kinda like a better auto-Away).

post #292 of 339
.....

Edited by Jetz - 1/14/14 at 11:26am
post #293 of 339
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevenwatts1012 View Post

I own a Nest thermostat and I love the product. I am really disappointed to hear that Google bought them. I feel like they were really disrupting the home automation space and were poised to be a great stand alone, entrepreneurial company. Now, you can bet that the Nest's focus will change and their products will start to suck. I hope Google and Nest prove me wrong.

As far as other comments go - it would not have made sense for Apple to buy Nest, and I am not at all sure why Apple would want to buy Tesla. That is just insane.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post
 

If Google can continue to fund money losers (as a type of very long term R&D) it will be bad for their immediate and near term, but possibly be of benefit in the long run. Considering none of these companies represent their core competency, I think they are just spending wildly and foolishly.

 

I remember when people said the same thing about Google buying YouTube and when Google launched Maps and GMail.

 

Good on Google that they take risks when so many companies are far more risk-averse.

 

And luckily for Nest, they now have an owner with deep pockets who is willing to turbocharge their progress.  Far from being disappointed, I'm excited to see what Nest will develop, now that they have Google's pockets.

 

My only disappointment is that they never IPO'd so that I could get a piece.

post #294 of 339
Quote:
Originally Posted by Disturbia View Post

Guys & Girls, Apple did / does NOT need this crap.

Goofle with their dumb and talentless workers need the brains behind the design.

Microsoft is the one who should've bought them but not at that price or else the whole Internet would laugh! But they don't laugh at Goofle! Why? Because Goofle is well ... Goofle!

Goofle paid 3.2 billion for the NAME of the MAN behind so-called VISION who everyone calls him the Father of iPod (or something like that) NOT for the product they selling.

Also, Nest is a luxury crap which is NOT in a typical Gooflers' DNA to buy. YES, if ever Goofle gives it out for FREE, then their fans would love to have one. Until then, there goes another 3.2 billions for something that Goofle has NO clue if they can use it to make some $$ if ever.

Edit -> Interesting!! http://www.tuaw.com/2014/01/14/why-apple-didnt-buy-nest/

Are you implying that "Goofle" is "offal"?
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post #295 of 339
Quote:
Originally Posted by hmurchison View Post
 

Nest owes a lot of it's attention to the fact that Fadell and Rogers were ex Apple Execs.   If they don't have that as a marketing piece the road they travel becomes much harder. 

 

Nests technology is great but don't fool yourself into thinking that there isn't competition. 

 

Netatmo Therm -  Neatly ties in to their weather station 

 

Centralite Pearl Therm -  Will be using Zigbee Home Automation 1.2 

 

Tado Therm - UK's best shot at a Nest competitor 

 

Honeywell Prestige Therm - Can't count these guys out 

 

Allure Energy Eversense Therm - supports iBeacon/NFC modules for the room.  

 

Apple doesn't need to pay a billion dollars for product they don't need.   Apple's likely not going to play the hardware 

game.   If I'm a betting man I'd say that they will align with either Zigbee or Z Wave or both.   They will probably abstract 

them enough to add some proprietary features for OS X/iOS in an Apple Framework for devs to write against that ads a 

bit more Wow Factor than what Zigbee or Z Wave provides. 

 

If Apple were to acquire a company it'd probably be Polish based Fibaro.  Their product design is more Apple than anyone. 

I have to agree with you, the market place is already crowded and NEST solution is no better than what others are offering they just made the device on the wall like like the old style round thermostat that have been around a long time. This space is way too complicated and required someone who understand what they are doing to automate a home. I have been doing this for 20 yrs and no two homes are exactly alike and you have to deal with home specific issue to make these things all play together.

post #296 of 339
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maestro64 View Post
 

I have to agree with you, the market place is already crowded and NEST solution is no better than what others are offering they just made the device on the wall like like the old style round thermostat that have been around a long time. This space is way too complicated and required someone who understand what they are doing to automate a home. I have been doing this for 20 yrs and no two homes are exactly alike and you have to deal with home specific issue to make these things all play together.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Arlor View Post
 

 

That seems to be the motivation for the steady drumbeat of "Buy Nest! Buy Tesla!" 

 

Apple sensibly prefers to buy undervalued and/or mission-critical properties. Apple doesn't need to be in the car or home businesses. Apple's always prevailed through relentless focus and polish. Leave it to Google and others to play with thermostats and self-driving cars. They're cool, they get good press, but they're not markets that are ripe for the kind of shine Apple likes to put on its products. 

 

The most difficult part of home automation is a lack of state mandated enforcement of the International, never mind State subset of, Construction standards.

 

Idaho is a complete joke run by non-bonded and licensed hacks doing home construction, never mind commercial.

 

Washington State is all licensed and bonded, but having worked closely with some contractors [on the job] they all cut corners, over charge the consumer which resulted in myself as a mechanical engineer helping family out into a heated series of arguments.

 

The inspectors are morons who easily get bribed.

 

With rare exception, even all new home construction does not meet the R factor insulation requirements, the proper treated timber, the minimum foundation requirements in WA and northern climates, to the correct span between 2 x 6, etc.

 

Automating poorly constructed homes is a nightmare.

 

The commercial industry is the only space worth investigating and Honeywell is king in the US.

post #297 of 339

FWIW: Fadell does not have more than 300 patents authored:

 

http://patft.uspto.gov/netacgi/nph-Parser?Sect1=PTO2&Sect2=HITOFF&p=1&u=%2Fnetahtml%2FPTO%2Fsearch-bool.html&r=0&f=S&l=50&TERM1=Fadell&FIELD1=INNM&co1=AND&TERM2=&FIELD2=&d=PTXT

 

The guy is credited [most jointly with others] 73 in the US.

 

In fact, every single patent he's got his name on it along with actual engineers, so no he hasn't authored more than 300, never mind 73, but he has gone on the ride and helped shape 73 in the US, all but 14 of those patents working at Apple where 3-12 other engineers names are stamped on every one.

 

Ironically, the vast majority of his patents are on plugin adaptor interfacing. Big fucking deal.

post #298 of 339
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maestro64 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by hmurchison View Post

 
Nest owes a lot of it's attention to the fact that Fadell and Rogers were ex Apple Execs.   If they don't have that as a marketing piece the road they travel becomes much harder. 

Nests technology is great but don't fool yourself into thinking that there isn't competition. 

Netatmo Therm -  Neatly ties in to their weather station 

Centralite Pearl Therm -  Will be using Zigbee Home Automation 1.2 

Tado Therm - UK's best shot at a Nest competitor 

Honeywell Prestige Therm - Can't count these guys out 

Allure Energy Eversense Therm - supports iBeacon/NFC modules for the room.  

Apple doesn't need to pay a billion dollars for product they don't need.   Apple's likely not going to play the hardware 
game.   If I'm a betting man I'd say that they will align with either Zigbee or Z Wave or both.   They will probably abstract 
them enough to add some proprietary features for OS X/iOS in an Apple Framework for devs to write against that ads a 
bit more Wow Factor than what Zigbee or Z Wave provides. 

If Apple were to acquire a company it'd probably be Polish based Fibaro.  Their product design is more Apple than anyone. 
I have to agree with you, the market place is already crowded and NEST solution is no better than what others are offering they just made the device on the wall like like the old style round thermostat that have been around a long time. This space is way too complicated and required someone who understand what they are doing to automate a home. I have been doing this for 20 yrs and no two homes are exactly alike and you have to deal with home specific issue to make these things all play together.

To really do an efficient/energy-saving job of HVAC, don't you need to manipulate the plenums in the ductwork? For example, close the ducts to the upstairs bedrooms (except the baby's room) during the day so that you are not cooling or heating unused space... Then, there's ceiling fans, attic exhaust fans, swamp coolers and misters in desert climates, solar heating, circulating hot water...

All this needs to be coordinated with the utility to use power in cheap off-peak hours. Supermarkets have been doing this using power-shedders for years -- in the 1980s our Silicon Valley computer store had several customers using Apple ][ computers to offer a power shedding solution for supermarkets, labs, etc.
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post #299 of 339
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post #300 of 339
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdriftmeyer View Post
 

 

 

The most difficult part of home automation is a lack of state mandated enforcement of the International, never mind State subset of, Construction standards.

 

Idaho is a complete joke run by non-bonded and licensed hacks doing home construction, never mind commercial.

 

Washington State is all licensed and bonded, but having worked closely with some contractors [on the job] they all cut corners, over charge the consumer which resulted in myself as a mechanical engineer helping family out into a heated series of arguments.

 

The inspectors are morons who easily get bribed.

 

With rare exception, even all new home construction does not meet the R factor insulation requirements, the proper treated timber, the minimum foundation requirements in WA and northern climates, to the correct span between 2 x 6, etc.

 

Automating poorly constructed homes is a nightmare.

 

The commercial industry is the only space worth investigating and Honeywell is king in the US.

I can attest to this. Every time I have to go into some previously unexplored area of my home built in 2006, I seem to find more stuff the "inspector" missed. Insulation on the very outside sections of our master bedroom had only a light dusting of blown-in insulation, they shoved fiberglass insulation at the lowest points of the roof between the trusses that blocked the air flow from the soffits intakes to the peak vents, and blown-in insulation covering the soffit intakes. This was only discovered two weekends ago when I was up there moving blown in insulation to install batts. I can't tell you how many of the structured wiring pulls they installed didn't work due to either (1) bad end point termination or (2) most likely being damaged by drywall screws, nails or other fasteners. I found a number when I first moved in and simply tested them with my cable tester. Why couldn't they do this? Right, they could, but they didn't give enough of a crap. We've been lucky in that we haven't seemed to have had any major things that I've found ... yet.

 

I wish I'd been able to buy during the construction process so I could have installed low voltage conduit, security wiring and other infrastructure myself, but that wasn't in the cards at the time so I am now trying to retrofit which is a giant pain. I hate whomever came up with the idea of blown-in insulation, had to be an installer as after that initial step, it's a nightmare.

post #301 of 339
What will happen to the people who currently work for Nest? These types of takeovers often result in a lot of people either being laid off due to duplication of departments (they don't need 2 HR depts, 2 Payroll, etc) or the top techie people not wanting to work in a big company like Google and hence leave to start over somewhere else. People who work in the small companies where they have their own work ethics hate moving to a big company with way different work rules, pay scales, vacation benefits, and all the other perks. Will Nest lose 10%? 20%?

Now I'm just waiting for a new version of Nest thermostat that shows Google ads. Or perhaps sends your temperature patterns to Google who can then send you ads based on how high or low you keep your temperatures. If too low, perhaps ads for down comforters?

Wonder if Apple will still be able to sell the thermostats?
post #302 of 339
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post


To really do an efficient/energy-saving job of HVAC, don't you need to manipulate the plenums in the ductwork? For example, close the ducts to the upstairs bedrooms (except the baby's room) during the day so that you are not cooling or heating unused space... Then, there's ceiling fans, attic exhaust fans, swamp coolers and misters in desert climates, solar heating, circulating hot water...

All this needs to be coordinated with the utility to use power in cheap off-peak hours. Supermarkets have been doing this using power-shedders for years -- in the 1980s our Silicon Valley computer store had several customers using Apple ][ computers to offer a power shedding solution for supermarkets, labs, etc.

If Nest cared about energy they wouldn't have made their second product an overdone Smoke Detector.    They would have done this 

 

http://econetcontrols.com/EV100.php

Simply tossing in a smartphone enabled thermostat doesn't make your home smart.   Ideally you'd want to control the entire flow of heat to rooms as you say Dick and have this automated. 

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post #303 of 339

Quote: And now I’ll never buy one (much less the three I’d planned). Ever.

 

I am sure that if Nest had known that a guy on the internet had said he was going to buy up to three devices, they would never had sold. I can see The Onion headlines now ...

post #304 of 339
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheUnfetteredMind View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by mdriftmeyer View Post

 


The most difficult part of home automation is a lack of state mandated enforcement of the International, never mind State subset of, Construction standards.

Idaho is a complete joke run by non-bonded and licensed hacks doing home construction, never mind commercial.

Washington State is all licensed and bonded, but having worked closely with some contractors [on the job] they all cut corners, over charge the consumer which resulted in myself as a mechanical engineer helping family out into a heated series of arguments.

The inspectors are morons who easily get bribed.

With rare exception, even all new home construction does not meet the R factor insulation requirements, the proper treated timber, the minimum foundation requirements in WA and northern climates, to the correct span between 2 x 6, etc.

Automating poorly constructed homes is a nightmare.

The commercial industry is the only space worth investigating and Honeywell is king in the US.
I can attest to this. Every time I have to go into some previously unexplored area of my home built in 2006, I seem to find more stuff the "inspector" missed. Insulation on the very outside sections of our master bedroom had only a light dusting of blown-in insulation, they shoved fiberglass insulation at the lowest points of the roof between the trusses that blocked the air flow from the soffits intakes to the peak vents, and blown-in insulation covering the soffit intakes. This was only discovered two weekends ago when I was up there moving blown in insulation to install batts. I can't tell you how many of the structured wiring pulls they installed didn't work due to either (1) bad end point termination or (2) most likely being damaged by drywall screws, nails or other fasteners. I found a number when I first moved in and simply tested them with my cable tester. Why couldn't they do this? Right, they could, but they didn't give enough of a crap. We've been lucky in that we haven't seemed to have had any major things that I've found ... yet.

I wish I'd been able to buy during the construction process so I could have installed low voltage conduit, security wiring and other infrastructure myself, but that wasn't in the cards at the time so I am now trying to retrofit which is a giant pain. I hate whomever came up with the idea of blown-in insulation, had to be an installer as after that initial step, it's a nightmare.

Ha! When we moved to Tucson (circa 1991) we bought a 3-4 year old Del Web Townhouse. This was [mostly] well-built, well-insulated 2300 square 3 BR 3 Bath. It had solar water heating and instant hot water...

The solar never worked right (wrong size collector and poor installation). The worst, though, was the instant hot water -- it was the kind that used a small (efficient) pump to continuously recirculate the hot water to all the taps in the house. But they really dropped the ball -- the water was recirculated through uninsulated copper tubing embedded in the slab, We ran the system for a month and it cost about $50 (1991 dollars). Quickly turned that off...

The other thing was a no-no: You don't embed copper tubing in a concrete slab -- a chemical reaction will cause the copper to deteriorate.

On the other hand, an architect friend designed and built his own home with an [exposed, colored] insulated concrete slab with embedded plastic tubing for radiant heating -- done right, it was inexpensive and energy-efficient.
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post #305 of 339
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdriftmeyer View Post

FWIW: Fadell does not have more than 300 patents authored:

http://patft.uspto.gov/netacgi/nph-Parser?Sect1=PTO2&Sect2=HITOFF&p=1&u=%2Fnetahtml%2FPTO%2Fsearch-bool.html&r=0&f=S&l=50&TERM1=Fadell&FIELD1=INNM&co1=AND&TERM2=&FIELD2=&d=PTXT

The guy is credited [most jointly with others] 73 in the US.

In fact, every single patent he's got his name on it along with actual engineers, so no he hasn't authored more than 300, never mind 73, but he has gone on the ride and helped shape 73 in the US, all but 14 of those patents working at Apple where 3-12 other engineers names are stamped on every one.

Ironically, the vast majority of his patents are on plugin adaptor interfacing. Big fucking deal.
And Nest products are designed by a design consultancy firm yet the media is treating this as though Google bought Dieter Rams.
post #306 of 339
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post #307 of 339
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post


Ha! When we moved to Tucson (circa 1991) we bought a 3-4 year old Del Web Townhouse. This was [mostly] well-built, well-insulated 2300 square 3 BR 3 Bath. It had solar water heating and instant hot water...

The solar never worked right (wrong size collector and poor installation). The worst, though, was the instant hot water -- it was the kind that used a small (efficient) pump to continuously recirculate the hot water to all the taps in the house. But they really dropped the ball -- the water was recirculated through uninsulated copper tubing embedded in the slab, We ran the system for a month and it cost about $50 (1991 dollars). Quickly turned that off...

The other thing was a no-no: You don't embed copper tubing in a concrete slab -- a chemical reaction will cause the copper to deteriorate.

On the other hand, an architect friend designed and built his own home with an [exposed, colored] insulated concrete slab with embedded plastic tubing for radiant heating -- done right, it was inexpensive and energy-efficient.

 

I may make the move to Colorado in 5 years or so and the lady and I have chatted about what we want in our home.  Luckily she has family in the construction biz (GC) who are doing their home right now in Loveland CO I believe.   We're hoping we can build new construction or heavily remodel with their help.  We know we need a GC that will ensure the work is done correctly.    I'm also reading up more about LEED construction. We want to be Green where it makes sense.   Lighting and Networking is really important to me and heating/cooling is important to her.  

 

Our Issaquah Town-home is going to be the testbed for now.   I'm thinking of adding more Hue bulbs and testing out some cameras and sensors on windows and doors.  Next home will probably have motorized shades, Solar panels, water treatment and more.  5 years from now the technology is going to make 2014 look like Playschool stuff and hopefully Apple will have some solid OS support. 

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post #308 of 339

....the lack of properly optimized apps is one of the reasons "why the experience on Android tablets is so crappy".

Tim Cook ~ The Wall Street Journal - February 7, 2014

Inside Google! 

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....the lack of properly optimized apps is one of the reasons "why the experience on Android tablets is so crappy".

Tim Cook ~ The Wall Street Journal - February 7, 2014

Inside Google! 

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post #309 of 339
Quote:
Originally Posted by hmurchison View Post
 

Nest owes a lot of it's attention to the fact that Fadell and Rogers were ex Apple Execs.   If they don't have that as a marketing piece the road they travel becomes much harder.

 

Nests technology is great but don't fool yourself into thinking that there isn't competition.

 

Netatmo Therm -  Neatly ties in to their weather station

 

Centralite Pearl Therm -  Will be using Zigbee Home Automation 1.2

 

Tado Therm - UK's best shot at a Nest competitor

 

Honeywell Prestige Therm - Can't count these guys out

 

Allure Energy Eversense Therm - supports iBeacon/NFC modules for the room.

 

Apple doesn't need to pay a billion dollars for product they don't need.   Apple's likely not going to play the hardware

game.   If I'm a betting man I'd say that they will align with either Zigbee or Z Wave or both.   They will probably abstract

them enough to add some proprietary features for OS X/iOS in an Apple Framework for devs to write against that ads a

bit more Wow Factor than what Zigbee or Z Wave provides.

 

If Apple were to acquire a company it'd probably be Polish based Fibaro.  Their product design is more Apple than anyone.

 

This is like saying the original iPhone was just another smartphone.  If Nest is not-so-special, why are their sales taking off?

post #310 of 339
Quote:
Originally Posted by Disturbia View Post



1) Did you know they have names?

2) Did you know there is a 4th monkey that coincidentally uses a principle that is nearly identical to Google's motto?

"The three monkeys are Mizaru, covering his eyes, who sees no evil; Kikazaru, covering his ears, who hears no evil; and Iwazaru, covering his mouth, who speaks no evil. Sometimes there is a fourth monkey depicted with the three others; the last one, Shizaru, symbolizes the principle of "do no evil". He may be shown crossing his arms or covering his genitals."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Three_wise_monkeys

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"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #311 of 339
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jetz View Post
 

 

This is like saying the original iPhone was just another smartphone.  If Nest is not-so-special, why are their sales taking off?

 

Firstly the Nest product was done very well.  Secondly they chose a classic design Round.  Those of us kids of the 60s and 70s remember the round Honeywells Thermostats very well.   Thirdly they knocked it out of the park with simplicity.   Thermostats where right up there with VCR flashing 12:00 on their clocks with regard to lack of decent UI/UX. 

 

Look at the Eversense from Allure Energy.  It's a bit overdone in features but they've got 5 patents on proximity features alone with more pending.  The Centralite Pearl looks good as well and integrates into HA environments.   I'm not saying Nest doesn't deserve it.   They made the Thermostat something that could be a feature in your home and save you money.   Honeywell isn't going to put that much attention into their Thermostat line. 

 

I'm thrilled that there's this much excitement around home energy products but the notion that Apple missed out on buying nest for Billions makes absolutely no sense because Apple doesn't care about datamining so Nests cloud data is of no particular value to them.  I don't see Apple making hardware.  I see them facilitating HA via strong links into OS X and iOS and letting the market deliver the standout products.  Apple doesn't make Airplays speakers and that's fine because there are a lot of offerings in this area.   

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post #312 of 339
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post
Shizaru, symbolizes the principle of "do no evil". He may be shown crossing his arms or covering his genitals."

 

It’s terrifying how apropos that is, particularly when you think of the word ‘google’ out of context.

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone] exists, it doesn’t deserve to.
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Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone] exists, it doesn’t deserve to.
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post #313 of 339
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

1) Did you know they have names?

 

Wow! I didn't know. I mean the 4th one. Thank you for very informative and interesting post. :)

....the lack of properly optimized apps is one of the reasons "why the experience on Android tablets is so crappy".

Tim Cook ~ The Wall Street Journal - February 7, 2014

Inside Google! 

Reply

....the lack of properly optimized apps is one of the reasons "why the experience on Android tablets is so crappy".

Tim Cook ~ The Wall Street Journal - February 7, 2014

Inside Google! 

Reply
post #314 of 339
Quote:
Originally Posted by Disturbia View Post

Wow! I didn't know. Thank you for very informative and interesting post. 1smile.gif

I only found out this past weakend on the latest episode of QI.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #315 of 339
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post


I only found out this past weakend on the latest episode of QI.
 

That seems to be a super cool site. :)

....the lack of properly optimized apps is one of the reasons "why the experience on Android tablets is so crappy".

Tim Cook ~ The Wall Street Journal - February 7, 2014

Inside Google! 

Reply

....the lack of properly optimized apps is one of the reasons "why the experience on Android tablets is so crappy".

Tim Cook ~ The Wall Street Journal - February 7, 2014

Inside Google! 

Reply
post #316 of 339
Quote:
Originally Posted by Disturbia View Post

That seems to be a super cool site. 1smile.gif

It's a TV show on BBC that has been on for about a decade now. If you enjoy comedy and unusual facts you'll likely enjoy the show. I think most episodes are on YouTube.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #317 of 339
melior diabolus quem scies
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melior diabolus quem scies
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post #318 of 339
Quote:
Originally Posted by Macky the Macky View Post


I'd wager you'd drop your pants and bend over in front of Schmidt, for a LOT less then a billion...

 

Who me ? Yes right, I would, for much less than that, why ? Do you have some savings to blow ?

 

But this is Tony we are talking about, I thought that by founding Nest he had a much greater vision in mind than ultimately selling it to google...

So disappointed... 

post #319 of 339

In facts, funny that one of my Nest stopped working few days before the acquisition announcement... It must somehow have discovered it would soon be referred to as a droid heat control and ad delivery appliance, and have decided to self sabotage. I shall respect that and not try to fix it. Or I should do it quickly before groogle support geek squad takes over...

post #320 of 339
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

I only found out this past weakend on the latest episode of QI.


Thanks for the link, that’s going on my RSS feed.

Edit: seems like it can't be added
"Few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example" Mark Twain
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
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"Few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example" Mark Twain
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
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