or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPhone › Apple's iPhone now represents 42% of smartphones owned in the US - NPD
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Apple's iPhone now represents 42% of smartphones owned in the US - NPD

post #1 of 79
Thread Starter 
The launch of the iPhone 5s and iPhone 5c helped propel Apple to a market leading 42 percent of smartphones owned in the U.S. in the fourth quarter of 2013, leading Samsung's 26 percent share, according to the latest data from the NPD Group.

NPD


Apple's share of the U.S. market was up from 35 percent in the fourth quarter of 2012, the NPD data released on Thursday reveals. Rival Samsung was up as well, but not by as much, growing from 22 percent of U.S. smartphones a year prior.

The figures show that Apple's lead in its home market is widening, and that it and Samsung are taking an increasingly larger share of the U.S. market as rivals slip. Together, Samsung and Apple command 68 percent of smartphones owned in the U.S.Together, Apple and Samsung represent 68 percent of smartphones in the U.S., while 60 percent of mobile subscribers now have a smartphone.

As Apple and Samsung grew, significant losses were seen by competing smartphone makers Motorola, HTC and BLackBerry. The only other company among the top six to see any share gains was LG, which grew slightly but still controls less than 10 percent of the market.

NPD also found that smartphone penetration continues to grow in America, reaching six in ten cell phone users in the fourth quarter of 2013. That was up from 52 percent of the mobile market in the fourth quarter of 2012.

Unsurprisingly, mobile data use is also on the rise, with smartphone owners polled using an average of 6.6 gigabytes per month as of the end of 2013 --?up from 5.5 gigabytes a year prior. NPD cited streaming music services as a "key driver" in data use, with Pandora, iHeart Radio and Spotify taking the top three spots.

NPD's list of the top domestic music streaming services made no mention of Apple's iTunes Radio, which launched last September and is built in to the company's iOS 7 mobile operating system.
post #2 of 79
Whatever the future may hold, I can't imagine life without some sort of personal device, always with me. Be that a smartphone, I think we should be very grateful for Apple to have such eye for detail, class, taste and refinement. Steve, if this was your doing, thank you. I certainly do not want to think about what the future would be with a smartphone from any other company than the one you created. Yes, thank you.
post #3 of 79
I forget. . .
Is NPD on the "don't trust 'em" list or "reliable reporting source" list? 1wink.gif
melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
post #4 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

I forget. . .
Is NPD on the "don't trust 'em" list or "reliable reporting source" list? 1wink.gif

I don't think any numbers are to be considered trust worthy unless they are in an SEC filing. That includes Schmidt tweeting how many trillion Android actions per (tP) Planck.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply
post #5 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

I forget. . .
Is NPD on the "don't trust 'em" list or "reliable reporting source" list? 1wink.gif

Don't think it matters; just look around you. There's your market share. Where I live and walk, predominately iPhone.
post #6 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

I forget. . .
Is NPD on the "don't trust 'em" list or "reliable reporting source" list? 1wink.gif

 

It depends on what the individual report from them appears to favor.  This report, I believe, would be filed under 'reliable'

post #7 of 79
Quote:
Unsurprisingly, mobile data use is also on the rise, with smartphone owners polled using an average of 6.6 gigabytes per month as of the end of 2013 — up from 5.5 gigabytes a year prior.

 

That sounds like a lot of data.  Especially with ATT and VZW offering 4 cheaper plans before you get to the $120/mo. plan that offers up to 6GB data.  And now NPD says mean usage is OVER 6GB???  Something is fishy... what is the usage of most American smartphone consumers?  Perhaps a few high-level users in NPD's sample set are skewing their statistics.  I seriously doubt the two biggest carriers would offer so many low price points if those plans were irrelevant to the bulk of consumers. 

 

Or, perhaps the "data" includes WiFi data usage by these smartphones?  I really don't think that should count as "mobile data" though.

 

Yes, I think NPD is in error here.


Edited by TeaEarleGreyHot - 1/16/14 at 9:28am
post #8 of 79
That's a notable increase, if accurate.
post #9 of 79
Sooner or later, the cream rises.
post #10 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post


Don't think it matters; just look around you. There's your market share. Where I live and walk, predominately iPhone.

Agree.  I am from small town USA but was recently in Chicago, IL and NYC...all I saw was iPhone...

post #11 of 79
The GB obviously includes WiFi or something is screwy. (And if actual usage matters, rather than the carriers, then looking at ALL mobile device data makes sense--even if you're at a hotspot.)

I have the pro-Google headline all worked out for the media to use:

"Dark Clouds Over Cupertino: Twice as Many Android Handset Makers as iPhone Makers Gain Users."
post #12 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post

Don't think it matters; just look around you. There's your market share. Where I live and walk, predominately iPhone.

Where I live it seems predominantly Android.

By the way there's a pretty cool interactive map showing where Android, iOS, Blackberry and "other" mobile devices are in use based on Twitter logs. Be sure to turn off one tab before activating another or you don't see much change. Too, zooming in on a city like Atlanta or Chicago shows iOS use most pronounced in the city cores while Android seems in higher use in the suburbs and other surrounding areas.
https://www.mapbox.com/labs/twitter-gnip/brands/#
melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
post #13 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post


Where I live it seems predominantly Android.

By the way there's a pretty cool interactive map showing where Android, iOS, Blackberry and "other" mobile devices are in use based on Twitter logs. Be sure to turn off one tab before activating another or you don't see much change. Too, zooming in on a city like Atlanta or Chicago shows iOS use most pronounced in the city cores while Android seems in higher use in the suburbs and other surrounding areas.
https://www.mapbox.com/labs/twitter-gnip/brands/#

Thanks for that link! Some can use it to avoid sloppy areas, afraid of getting mugged¡
post #14 of 79
At lunch right now. Bartender says he prefers Android over iPhone. Instead of ignoring him, I challenge him to tell me why. Well he can download whatever he wants. When I realized he primarily downloaded FREE apps, I had a great laugh. He confirmed the free apps. I am tempted to loan him my old 4S just to show him there is more to it. On his own he praised the iPhone camera being superior than Android cameras. This is great.
post #15 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

I forget. . .
Is NPD on the "don't trust 'em" list or "reliable reporting source" list? 1wink.gif


They ALL are .....

 

With that said:

 

.

.

.

.

.

IDC’s last market share study shows that 81% of devices are now running Android. That's compared to 12.9% running iOS. If you look at installed base rather than last quarter’s shipments, you’d see a smaller difference. But Android is still the obvious global leader.

 

The people who go to resorts in the Caribbean sea are typically from Canada, the US, the UK, and Western Europe. Because these vacations are not cheap, they also tend to be affluent. Keeping that in mind, here's what I noticed in terms of device usage trends.

 

Apple’s iPhone was significantly more popular than any other smartphone platform. I carried my Samsung Galaxy S4 with me, but most of the other guests had iPhones. I didn’t do a scientific poll or anything, but I’d say it was 80% iPhone, with the rest being mostly Android along with a very small number of BlackBerry. It was interesting for me to see this, because it really does suggest that iPhone much stronger market share among the wealthy compared to what the global figures suggest.

.

.

.

.

http://www.imore.com/forget-market-share-heres-glimpse-apples-poolside-share

 

So ... Android and or whatever it runs on truly sincerely unapologetically look, feel and smell like shit and they're everywhere :no: ... well, almost ... if you know what I mean!

 

And, then ... there are iDiamonds  8-) 

....the lack of properly optimized apps is one of the reasons "why the experience on Android tablets is so crappy".

Tim Cook ~ The Wall Street Journal - February 7, 2014

Inside Google! 

Reply

....the lack of properly optimized apps is one of the reasons "why the experience on Android tablets is so crappy".

Tim Cook ~ The Wall Street Journal - February 7, 2014

Inside Google! 

Reply
post #16 of 79
Is this usage or shipments?
post #17 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post


Where I live it seems predominantly Android.

By the way there's a pretty cool interactive map showing where Android, iOS, Blackberry and "other" mobile devices are in use based on Twitter logs. Be sure to turn off one tab before activating another or you don't see much change. Too, zooming in on a city like Atlanta or Chicago shows iOS use most pronounced in the city cores while Android seems in higher use in the suburbs and other surrounding areas.
https://www.mapbox.com/labs/twitter-gnip/brands/#

Thanks for the link. I clicked on the "other" expecting to see the windows phone. Where is it? Whoa nelly. MS screwed the pooch on this one.

post #18 of 79

Billions and Billions and Billions and Billions of activations.....wait what?

-Eric Schmidt -

Help! I'm trapped in a white dungeon of amazing precision and impeccable tolerances!

Reply

Help! I'm trapped in a white dungeon of amazing precision and impeccable tolerances!

Reply
post #19 of 79
Average of 6.6 gb pr month?
post #20 of 79
post #21 of 79

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply
post #22 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

Can you spot the flaw in that study?

It's from NPD? 1biggrin.gif


Completely kidding. Carry on. . .
melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
post #23 of 79

I'm predicting 50%+ share by the end of 4th Qtr 2014:

 

iPhone 6 - will have both 4 inch and 5 inch screens

iPhone 5C - will be for the cheapskates ( $0 on contract, $450 unlocked)

post #24 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post

Whatever the future may hold, I can't imagine life without some sort of personal device, always with me.

 

I can. I like to spend a lot of time outdoors and, while a personal device is nice, I find it distracting. I should be outside looking at nature, listening to nature, enjoying nature, and not focused on how can I get a photo or video of 'this' to share on the internet.

 

I made a similar comment a panorama photographer Facebook group. That is, I thought making panoramas was more rewarding when it was hard. You had a sense of achievement. Now it is just click, click, click, stitch, and post (for the large 360 degree panoramas you see). When it becomes easy, it becomes mundane or so it seems to me. When it was difficult, one chose the scenes that were interesting. Now that it is easy, mundane scenes flood the internet and finding something interesting is time consuming and not as rewarding.

 

So the bottom line for me is put that personal device down and smell the roses.

post #25 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveN View Post
 

 

I can. I like to spend a lot of time outdoors and, while a personal device is nice, I find it distracting. I should be outside looking at nature, listening to nature, enjoying nature, and not focused on how can I get a photo or video of 'this' to share on the internet.

 

I made a similar comment a panorama photographer Facebook group. That is, I thought making panoramas was more rewarding when it was hard. You had a sense of achievement. Now it is just click, click, click, stitch, and post (for the large 360 degree panoramas you see). When it becomes easy, it becomes mundane or so it seems to me. When it was difficult, one chose the scenes that were interesting. Now that it is easy, mundane scenes flood the internet and finding something interesting is time consuming and not as rewarding.

 

So the bottom line for me is put that personal device down and smell the roses.

 

yes, balance is necessary. My wife and I have a policy NEVER to use our iPhones when we are at dinner/lunch.  We do check if its a phone call, since it might be an emergency.  But no texting, emails, ect.   Its ridiculous when we see families at a nice restaurant (or any restaurant) all playing with their phones instead of you know TALKING to each other!

post #26 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveN View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post

Whatever the future may hold, I can't imagine life without some sort of personal device, always with me.

I can. I like to spend a lot of time outdoors and, while a personal device is nice, I find it distracting. I should be outside looking at nature, listening to nature, enjoying nature, and not focused on how can I get a photo or video of 'this' to share on the internet.

I made a similar comment a panorama photographer Facebook group. That is, I thought making panoramas was more rewarding when it was hard. You had a sense of achievement. Now it is just click, click, click, stitch, and post (for the large 360 degree panoramas you see). When it becomes easy, it becomes mundane or so it seems to me. When it was difficult, one chose the scenes that were interesting. Now that it is easy, mundane scenes flood the internet and finding something interesting is time consuming and not as rewarding.

So the bottom line for me is put that personal device down and smell the roses.

I get what you're saying. And there is indeed 'nothing better' than to enjoy life, free and disconnected while outdoors. I'm a cyclist, and while enjoying nature for the entire day on my bike I love that I have my music with me, listening when I want. Taking a photo when I see 'opportunity'.

I spite of that, I still get your point.
post #27 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

It's from NPD? 1biggrin.gif


Completely kidding. Carry on. . .

That's certainly a clear sign. Their study doesn't take into account different types of users for various "smartphones." In fact, it makes no distinction between a lower-end smartphone (aka: The *NEW* feature phone) which tend to be smaller than 4.5" and higher-end smartphones which tend to be 4.5" or higher. This means the iPhone's usage is potentially getting aggregated with many phones that it really shouldn't be compared with. This isn't an iPhone v Android bias, as I don't think the S3/S4, HTC One/Max, etc. should be compared to these 21st-century feature phones, either.

I would wager they have iPhone v Android data so why not also separate that out in this study, as well as do a sub-4.5" Android data usage v 4.5" and up Android data usage comparison.

We don't even know if they are counting phablets or even tablets in this comparison since those still tend to use "phone" apps.

I can't believe these companies are staffed by dozens or hundreds of people that get paid well for this sort of crap work.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply
post #28 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by sog35 View Post
 

 

yes, balance is necessary. My wife and I have a policy NEVER to use our iPhones when we are at dinner/lunch.  We do check if its a phone call, since it might be an emergency.  But no texting, emails, ect.   Its ridiculous when we see families at a nice restaurant (or any restaurant) all playing with their phones instead of you know TALKING to each other!

 

Even worse is when you see a dating couple spending more time texting their friends than talking to each other. 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post


I get what you're saying. And there is indeed 'nothing better' than to enjoy life, free and disconnected while outdoors. I'm a cyclist, and while enjoying nature for the entire day on my bike I love that I have my music with me, listening when I want. Taking a photo when I see 'opportunity'.

I spite of that, I still get your point.
 

Some of my best memories have been having lunch with my Mom (now deceased) by a trickling brook in the desert southwest at the end of a trail and sitting on a rock overlooking a lake with a waterfall on the distant shore. In the moments of silence, the wind whispers through the trees or the birds sing.  That said, it is time to go outside and take my dog for a walk in the snow!

post #29 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveN View Post

Even worse is when you see a dating couple spending more time texting their friends than talking to each other.

That is so sad to see, every time. 
Quote:
Some of my best memories have been having lunch with my Mom (now deceased) by a trickling brook in the desert southwest at the end of a trail and sitting on a rock overlooking a lake with a waterfall on the distant shore. In the moments of silence, the wind whispers through the trees or the birds sing.

Moments like those it's good to have the memory, instead of a photo. Have you seen Six Feet Under? In the closing episode, the deceased Nate says to his sister Claire, wanting to take a picture of her loved ones she'll leave behind while moving to NYC, "you can't take a picture; it's already gone". Which I thought was a brilliant line.
Quote:
That said, it is time to go outside and take my dog for a walk in the snow!

Careful now, you're gonna make TS envious.
post #30 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post

Whatever the future may hold, I can't imagine life without some sort of personal device, always with me. Be that a smartphone, I think we should be very grateful for Apple to have such eye for detail, class, taste and refinement. Steve, if this was your doing, thank you. I certainly do not want to think about what the future would be with a smartphone from any other company than the one you created. Yes, thank you.

Agreed, Phil.

 

I think SJ's greatest contribution to tech was "corralling" HW & SW engineers into producing great HW & SW. One only has to look at MS  (Windows & Office) and Google (Ads & lack of privacy) to see how awful it might have been.

 

Best.


Edited by christopher126 - 1/16/14 at 11:31am
post #31 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveN View Post
 

 

Some of my best memories have been having lunch with my Mom (now deceased) by a trickling brook in the desert southwest at the end of a trail and sitting on a rock overlooking a lake with a waterfall on the distant shore. In the moments of silence, the wind whispers through the trees or the birds sing.  That said, it is time to go outside and take my dog for a walk in the snow!

Nice! :)

post #32 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post


That's certainly a clear sign. Their study doesn't take into account different types of users for various "smartphones." In fact, it makes no distinction between a lower-end smartphone (aka: The *NEW* feature phone) which tend to be smaller than 4.5" and higher-end smartphones which tend to be 4.5" or higher. This means the iPhone's usage is potentially getting aggregated with many phones that it really shouldn't be compared with. This isn't an iPhone v Android bias, as I don't think the S3/S4, HTC One/Max, etc. should be compared to these 21st-century feature phones, either.

I would wager they have iPhone v Android data so why not also separate that out in this study, as well as do a sub-4.5" Android data usage v 4.5" and up Android data usage comparison.

We don't even know if they are counting phablets or even tablets in this comparison since those still tend to use "phone" apps.

I can't believe these companies are staffed by dozens or hundreds of people that get paid well for this sort of crap work.

 

Your complaint doesn't make any sense.  The study is simply about screen size and its relation to data consumption.  The iPhone has a small screen, so it gets lumped in with the rest of the small screens.  Although you're probably right that a small-screened Android device is likely low-end and likely gets less usage, that doesn't make the study faulty.  I think that all you should take away from this is that people are more likely to consume information on a larger screen, regardless of what that screen is attached to.  I think it's yet another indicator that there is a market for a larger iPhone, but that dead horse has already been sufficiently beaten.

post #33 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by wakefinance View Post

Your complaint doesn't make any sense.  The study is simply about screen size and its relation to data consumption.  The iPhone has a small screen, so it gets lumped in with the rest of the small screens.  Although you're probably right that a small-screened Android device is likely low-end and likely gets less usage, that doesn't make the study faulty.  I think that all you should take away from this is that people are more likely to consume information on a larger screen, regardless of what that screen is attached to.  I think it's yet another indicator that there is a market for a larger iPhone, but that dead horse has already been sufficiently beaten.

So of the 4500 handset used if half were 4.5" or larger and half were below 4.5" you think that makes for a fair and even test?

So we have 2250 that have to higher-end Android smartphones likely with at least version 4.0 compared to a bunch of feature phones which could easily be using version 2.3 and you think that makes it a fair test to say that size is the differentiating factor?

Of those 2250 sub 4.5" handsets lets split the number again and say that half were iPhones and half we Android. Now you have only 1125 iPhone out of the entire 4500 handset tested and quite possibly none of those 1125 handsets tested using Android 4.0 or higher, having modern HW, or using any significant data. That could mean the iPhone in it's lowly 3.5" and 4" sizes could have double the data usage and yet you think it's fair that this suggests that it's the screen size that allows more data usage, not any other aspect of the device?

I didn't even get into phablets or tablets using phone apps for this comparison. It's simply flawed to the core based on the narrow level of data they were willing to present and anyone that says this proves those with larger displays will absolutely use more data than devices with smaller displays without considering the UI, apps, ecosystem, ease-of-use, HW, etc. are being irrational.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply
post #34 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post


Where I live it seems predominantly Android.

By the way there's a pretty cool interactive map showing where Android, iOS, Blackberry and "other" mobile devices are in use based on Twitter logs. Be sure to turn off one tab before activating another or you don't see much change. Too, zooming in on a city like Atlanta or Chicago shows iOS use most pronounced in the city cores while Android seems in higher use in the suburbs and other surrounding areas.
https://www.mapbox.com/labs/twitter-gnip/brands/#

Another way to look at that is people in the cities have too much time on their hands verses the people in the suburbs and country are actaully doing real work verse playing on their phones. Also notice lots of activities around major freeways, thus people tweeting and driving, good driving habits there.

post #35 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maestro64 View Post
 

Another way to look at that is people in the cities have too much time on their hands verses the people in the suburbs and country are actaully doing real work verse playing on their phones. Also notice lots of activities around major freeways, thus people tweeting and driving, good driving habits there.

 

Nah: poor and uneducated people like Android.  The surveys and studies point that out in plain english.  There are exceptions but the general rule is rich/educated prefer iPhone.
 
But what about the 90,000,000 galaxy phones sold last year?  Those are just as expensive as iPhone. Yes. But with an Android phone you can easily put your illegal/free apps, music, movies on it.  It ain't easy to do that on the iPhone.  So yes they are willing to pay upfront for the phone but then they get apps/music/movies free.  Thus they are poorer.
 
I mean really, have you ever seen a rich person or celebrity using a Galaxy phone who's not get paid to use the phone?  I see tons of rich/celebrity types that use iPhones and they are not getting paid 1 cent from Apple. I go to the rich area shopping centers and its 90% iPhone users.  I go to ghetto areas then i see more Samdung and Motorola.
 
Also alot of Galaxy sales are to people who can't afford both a smartphone and tablet. Thus poorer.  If you have an iPadMini or iPad there really isn't any need to have a huge phone.  If you can afford both an iPad + iPhone you must be pretty decent money wise.  Thus many Galaxy owners can't afford both.  So they get a huge-ass phone and try to make it with a compromised product that is too big to be a phone and too small to be a tablet. 

Edited by sog35 - 1/16/14 at 12:35pm
post #36 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maestro64 View Post

Another way to look at that is people in the cities have too much time on their hands verses the people in the suburbs and country are actaully doing real work verse playing on their phones. Also notice lots of activities around major freeways, thus people tweeting and driving, good driving habits there.

I think you make too false assumptions there.

The first is that people in cities aren't doing real work as opposed to the suburbs or countryside, but let's be honest about cities v countryside in terms of tower density and data rates. This means people in cities can likely use high-speed internet pretty much everywhere they are. If you're in a very large city it could be on a train, bus or cab or waiting in the countless and excessive lines that are a part of congested living all while having a job where you do "real work" that doesn't allow you to use your phone. Now it's possible that the lower density places can mean that you can more bandwidth and that higher density places get worse bandwidth (and higher echo requests) but that's not typically what happens.

The second is carpooling, the aforementioned public transportation that can take the highway, and traffic jams that can allow passengers in a private vehicle, passengers on a bus, or a driver sitting in traffic, respectively, to use their device. Now the last one is still unsafe and illegal (at least here in CA) but I wouldn't call it as bad a habit as texting whilst driving (i,e: foot on the gas pedal/in motion) as opposed to being behind the wheel of a stationary vehicle.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply
post #37 of 79

So Apple's over all phone market share in US =  42% of the smart phone x  60% smart phone penetration is 25.2%....

 

Given that AT&T CEO's comment about smart phone to be "the remote control of our lives" and China Mobile Chairman's ambition of "100% conversion from feature phones to smart phones customer base", I am wondering why anybody would say smart phone market is saturated....actually lots of room for growth.

post #38 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by wakefinance View Post

Your complaint doesn't make any sense.  The study is simply about screen size and its relation to data consumption.  The iPhone has a small screen, so it gets lumped in with the rest of the small screens.  Although you're probably right that a small-screened Android device is likely low-end and likely gets less usage, that doesn't make the study faulty.  I think that all you should take away from this is that people are more likely to consume information on a larger screen, regardless of what that screen is attached to.  I think it's yet another indicator that there is a market for a larger iPhone, but that dead horse has already been sufficiently beaten.

But it's an arbitrary divide. It's like saying people over 5'5" are more likely to own houses and cars and have a job. Little do we know the study includes children under 5' 5". That data skews the data for the <5'5" adults.
post #39 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post


So of the 4500 handset used if half were 4.5" or larger and half were below 4.5" you think that makes for a fair and even test?

So we have 2250 that have to higher-end Android smartphones likely with at least version 4.0 compared to a bunch of feature phones which could easily be using version 2.3 and you think that makes it a fair test to say that size is the differentiating factor?

Of those 2250 sub 4.5" handsets lets split the number again and say that half were iPhones and half we Android. Now you have only 1125 iPhone out of the entire 4500 handset tested and quite possibly none of those 1125 handsets tested using Android 4.0 or higher, having modern HW, or using any significant data. That could mean the iPhone in it's lowly 3.5" and 4" sizes could have double the data usage and yet you think it's fair that this suggests that it's the screen size that allows more data usage, not any other aspect of the device?

I didn't even get into phablets or tablets using phone apps for this comparison. It's simply flawed to the core based on the narrow level of data they were willing to present and anyone that says this proves those with larger displays will absolutely use more data than devices with smaller displays without considering the UI, apps, ecosystem, ease-of-use, HW, etc. are being irrational.

 

Yes, I think it's entirely fair.  Just because a phone is running Gingerbread doesn't mean it can't connect to the internet.  A slow phone still has access to every service as a fast phone.  You're unhappy with the results because you don't think it gives favor to the iPhone in its presentation of data, not because there was a flaw in their methods.  I agree with you that they could have provided more detailed data, but I don't think that there is anything false or misleading in the results they showed.  The data are what the data are.  Other studies could be done to demonstrate the difference that other aspects have on data consumption.

post #40 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by wakefinance View Post

Yes, I think it's entirely fair.  Just because a phone is running Gingerbread doesn't mean it can't connect to the internet.  A slow phone still has access to every service as a fast phone.  You're unhappy with the results because you don't think it gives favor to the iPhone in its presentation of data, not because there was a flaw in their methods.  I agree with you that they could have provided more detailed data, but I don't think that there is anything false or misleading in the results they showed.  The data are what the data are.  Other studies could be done to demonstrate the difference that other aspects have on data consumption.

1) Just because someone is 10yo doesn't mean you don't have a high-paying job and will millions of dollars saved and yet there aren't a lot of 10yos who fit that build.

2) You got me¡ I only care about data that favours Apple which is why I said I don't the number from NPD in this article that favour Apple.
Edited by SolipsismX - 1/16/14 at 2:37pm

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: iPhone
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPhone › Apple's iPhone now represents 42% of smartphones owned in the US - NPD