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Owners of 2011 MacBook Pros report critical GPU failures, system crashes - Page 3

post #81 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by Enigmamatic View Post

Typical hardware failure. Number of posts is statistically insignificant.

 

Yes, typical for windows machine but not Apple.  Unless Apple has gone the windows way too...

post #82 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by Macky the Macky View Post

My late 2005 Intel MBP 

That's not what this article is about.

post #83 of 150
Safe Boot not Safe Mode, its MAC OSX not Windows 1smile.gif
post #84 of 150
apparently the problem is the lead-free eco soldering. There are services on ebay to get your GPU soldered on with lead and that fixes it.
post #85 of 150

I have an MacbookPro8,3 with no problems, but it is a late 2011 model - crossing my fingers.   Did the late 2011 model have a different GPU setup and/or better soldering?

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post #86 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by e1618978 View Post

I have an MacbookPro8,3 with no problems, but it is a late 2011 model - crossing my fingers.   Did the late 2011 model have a different GPU setup and/or better soldering?

Same GPUs, same solder:

http://www.macrumors.com/2014/01/17/2011-macbook-pro-gpu-glitches/

"Many early and late–2011 MacBook Pro owners with discrete graphics cards seem to be experiencing GPU failures and system crashes on their machines."
post #87 of 150
I am glad AppleInsider is posting this article. Most web sites are afraid to say anything publicly to criticize Apple. But an even bigger problem is the issue with "burn-in" on most of the screens that have shipped with every version of the Retina MacBook Pro laptops (both 13 and 15-inch). Here is a thread that details the problem so many users have been experiencing:

https://discussions.apple.com/message/24523036#24523036

I hope AppleInsider can also publish an article about this, in order to pressure Apple into doing something about it, instead of denying that the problem even exists, or saying that image retention is normal.
post #88 of 150
This is just too common now. When is the industry going to deal with this at the fundamental level? These chips aren't built for heat tolerance in portables.

This is what killed my MacBook Pro 3,1. Because of it, I refuse to let my newer 5,5 MacBook Pro get intensive GPU and CPU activity. Makes it less a workstation and more an Internet console.
post #89 of 150
I have an 17" Early 2011 MacBook Pro with 2.2 Ghz Intel Core i7 and the Intel HD graphics 3000 512 MB but have not yet see any of these symptoms.
Does this alert apply to all 2011 MacBook Pros or are there exceptions? I am hoping to hear that mine is an exception. I went through the Nvida logic board problem with my previous MacBook Pro. That was an epic nightmare.
post #90 of 150
Originally Posted by compcaddy View Post
Not sure why you'd say that when I lost $3,000 on a laptop because of poorly designed hardware and they are doing nothing to help.

 


Because it either didn’t happen at all or you don’t know what you’re talking about. Either way, your post does absolutely nothing to help your position.

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone] exists, it doesn’t deserve to.
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Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone] exists, it doesn’t deserve to.
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post #91 of 150
Same issue with my early 2011 MacBook Pro (2.2 GHz Core i7, Radeon HD 6750M). Just forked $300 for a re-seating of GPU (pulling it out and re-soldering). Bad connection of GPU to logic board is the root cause of this issue.

Also, keep an eye on the fans. Sometimes they get dirty and may even fail as a result of a minor bump (usually the power connector gets loose and disconnects the fan) reduced airflow accelerates the GPU issue. Generally, you should keep CPU and GPU as cool as you can. Use a third party laptop cooling tray.

This issue is the result of a design and/or manufacturing flaw and should be covered by some kind of repair extension program. I hope this issues gets more media coverage to force Apple to act on this.
post #92 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by dysamoria View Post

This is just too common now. When is the industry going to deal with this at the fundamental level? These chips aren't built for heat tolerance in portables.

This is what killed my MacBook Pro 3,1. Because of it, I refuse to let my newer 5,5 MacBook Pro get intensive GPU and CPU activity. Makes it less a workstation and more an Internet console.

I think they might have dealt with it already. The newer laptops cool down much more quickly than earlier models and with the move to Iris Pro in the entry 15", that limits the amount of people that will be affected in future because Intel graphics don't suffer the same problems. It's also important to remember that most of Apple's laptop buyers aren't owners of 15" laptops. Their average selling price for laptops is $1200-1300 so the majority of their laptop sales are Macbook Airs and 13" laptops with IGPs.

Estimates are that around 80% of the laptop sales are 13" MBPs and Airs, 20% for the rest. That 20% is still a lot of people as they sell 14m laptops a year so 2.8m 15" owners per year. With the new Iris Pro, the owners of laptops with dedicated GPUs will probably drop below 5% of the laptop base.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Frank Lowney 
I have an 17" Early 2011 MacBook Pro with 2.2 Ghz Intel Core i7 and the Intel HD graphics 3000 512 MB but have not yet see any of these symptoms.
Does this alert apply to all 2011 MacBook Pros or are there exceptions? I am hoping to hear that mine is an exception.

Your 17" laptop also has a 6750M GPU in it - they have 2 GPUs. Everybody wants to be the exception but all the 2011 models have the same design and components.

People have a habit of thinking that these are $3k expenses when they fail. 3 year old $3k laptops are only worth around $1000-1400 so that's the loss if it fails after 3 years. They can be sold on right now and replaced with refurbs with warranties:

http://store.apple.com/us/product/FD103LL/A/refurbished-macbook-pro-23ghz-quad-core-intel-i7
http://store.apple.com/us/product/FC975LL/A/refurbished-macbook-pro-23ghz-quad-core-intel-i7-with-retina-display

and those warranties can be extended to another 3 years. There's no sense in holding onto old technology until it gives up and then mourning the huge initial outlay. If people keep selling and upgrading, that doesn't happen.

While there's no 17" model any more, the rMBP offers the same working resolution so eventually people will just have to get over it because the machines won't hold out forever.
post #93 of 150
I had an early 2011 17" MBP. The same issue started late April 2013. I did a ton of testing and at first I thought it was a software issue. Anytime it would happen I would run a permissions scan and found a directory tied to the discrete graphics card corrupt. I would repair the directory and it would be ok for a whie. So, I installed Cocktail and set it to automatically repair permissions daily.

However, the issue was never fully resolved. The next work around (used until I sold it) was installing gfxCardStatus. Then setting it to integrated at all times. Doing this made it possible for me until I rebooted. Then I would spend 30 minutes to 1 1/2 hours trying to reboot. I just had to continue to reboot until it booted on the integrated card.

So, I only rebooted when it was absolutely necessary which was every 30 days or so.

The integrated work around made it manageable but the biggest issue was I couldn't use an external monitor since it requires the discrete card.


It may be a coincidence but this issue seemed to occur more frequently with Lion and Mountain Liion and less frequently with Snow Leopard.

I ended up selling the 17" MBP for what I could get for it and purchased a lightly used 15" MBPr and immediately purchased AppleCare.

I learned a valuble lesson with this laptop, buying AppleCare is a must not optional. And I probably won't keep a Mac after the AppleCare has runout.

I have been a very happy Mac user since 2010 but this is very frustraiting.

Best of luck to you all with this issue.
post #94 of 150

Again nothing is perfect in life. Apple makes mistakes like every other company around.

post #95 of 150
Welcome to my nightmare. I have had two consecutive MacBooks fail. The obvious original titanium MBP that Apple eventually decided to fix (after I emailed Steve Jobs who told me Apple would not cover it out of warranty) but by then I had tossed it. And now two days ago my 2010 MacBook Air (which over the last week was running substantially hot with no SMC button pushing would fix). After begging and pleading with Apple Corporate I got waved away with a coupon. How f*cking rich do you people think I am? I am saddened and now Macless. After calculating what I would have made had I purchased Apple Stock instead of Macs? About $549,000.00.

ibimacguru@yahoo.com
(Please Apple read this and call so I don't continue to cry)
post #96 of 150

My 2011 15" MBP had this same problem. First the screen would flicker in strange ways, flip, overlap, looking a bit like an old broken CRT television, and sometimes the plain, blue screen. The fans would also suddenly come on full blast, when I hadn't even started working yet. I extended use of it using gfxCardStatus and forcing the machine to use the integrated graphics instead of the discrete card. The problem was actually getting there, since it would first have to go through the discrete before forcing the integrated. Still, it wouldn't last forever and the mac would eventually freeze (though I could at least access it to be sure everything was backed up properly).

 

It actually started happening right after two years, and it was clearly the AMD chip, so I took it to Apple (I thankfully had AppleCare), and they replaced the logic board without issue. Two weeks later, the problem started again, so I had to take it in again and they replaced the logic board AGAIN. In the end, since I couldn't trust the machine, I sold it at an incredibly reduced price with close to a year of AppleCare for the next person, having explained the issue in case it happens again.

 

This is an unacceptable situation (especially for their top, Pro laptops), and Apple should have called for an extended repair program ages ago for those without AppleCare, considering it's a product defect. I was lucky, and still, I had to buy a new one and lost money in the process.

post #97 of 150

Interesting that it took this long for this story to become a thing. You'd think 2011 machines would have started failing earlier than this, but I guess that's how these things go. Also, I have a 2011 MBP in my living room right now and I'm feeling a ticking clock now. 

post #98 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post

That's amazing. Times two. Defenitely not good on the Genius. Strange; it seems that there's a total lack of consistency (which Solip won't like, as do I). Strange.

Yeah tech support is great out of Cupertino. I had a software issue and couldn't find an answer anywhere. So I thought what the heck, let me just post it on their support page. They contacted me, spending a lot of time figuring it out (MobileMe / Aperture) They made me go through many steps, uploading a dummy .aplibrary through their FTP server.

Was a cool experience, yet they were unable to fix it. Didn't go by phone, all through Chat Support.

Found the transcript; we had a laugh:

Me:
some things Apple does remain in the States (like video rentals in iTunes)

Me:
Sorry, don't mean to fish for any future products or whatever

Apple Tech Support:
Oh yes. We talk to people from everywhere. I have prepared responses for different languages telling them we have to speak in English since I'm not Chinese etc.

Apple Tech Support:
If I knew I couldn't tell you, but we usually only hear the day before ha. We are pretty low down the info pole.

Apple Tech Support:
Hidden away in a dark office building with minimal lighting etc.

Me:
sounds like you guys are set up well over there

Apple Tech Support:
On lone snack machine and a microwave.

Apple Tech Support:
Ha, I'm just joking.

Me:
maybe low down, but definitely helping out!

Me:
but you do have a cook who cooks Thai meals, I read at jobs@apple.com somewhere

Apple Tech Support:
Ha, not at this site.

Apple Tech Support:
I will have to get a transfer.

Sounds a happy chap. That helps. I think it must be far less stressful than being a Genius and dealing with real people face to face. I'd probably go 'postal' after a few days in that job. So I can't blame them being defensive and aggressive at times. That support blog Apple has doesn't always help IMHO, some really bad Mac misinformation manifest and proliferates there. I can just imagine many folks waltz into an Apple Store convinced that have certain issues they don't, reinforced in that belief by the Apple Support web site information they have read (posted by other users), and get aggressive themselves when their belief system is challenged. Hence I prefer the nice slow and calm telephone call to a tech in CA.
Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
nMac Pro 6 Core, MacBookPro i7, MacBookPro i5, iPhones 5 and 5s, iPad Air, 2013 Mac mini, SE30, IIFx, Towers; G4 & G3.
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Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
nMac Pro 6 Core, MacBookPro i7, MacBookPro i5, iPhones 5 and 5s, iPad Air, 2013 Mac mini, SE30, IIFx, Towers; G4 & G3.
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post #99 of 150

Initially I loved everything about Apple. The whole philosophy of "Think Different" resonated positively with me. Then when I had questions I started going to the official Apple Support Forum. I quickly learned that the company stifles dissent no matter how justified it is. They delete threads all over the place. They don't delete posts as far as I can tell but they just delete a whole useful thread if they don't like an individual post. That behavior totally goes against the whole freedom to create and think different ideal.

 

Later I had a defective battery that was proven to be the same as the batteries made by Sony that were recalled the year before my model. Apple refused to replace it until I contacted the Consumer Product Safety Commission. Only then did they accept it as defective. It had expanded in size by several millimeters.

 

This screen fault is clearly not caused by the users. It is a hardware issue that is pervasive. Someone in Apple who has authority has already made the decision that they won't deal with this problem fairly. There is no way that this many failures hasn't been brought to the attention of upper management. They have decided that if you are out of warranty you are out of luck.

 

In another thread there is a very good suggestion that could help everybody in the long run. Everybody with this problem should go to Amazon.com and leave negative reviews stating your exact problem. Do it on every Mac Sales site too. With all of these true accounts spread around the web it will have an effect. It could in the long run change Apples policy of not recalling or at least not fixing genuine hardware design or manufacturing flaws honorably.  It will in time bite them in the a$$ when sales drop.

 

This also reinforces the iFixit position that when machines are crammed tightly into small packages and don't have user friendly repairable parts they are prohibitively expensive to fix. How many of you would prefer to have a machine that was bigger and weighed one or even two pounds more but didn't have these cooling problems?

post #100 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marvin View Post

People have a habit of thinking that these are $3k expenses when they fail. 3 year old $3k laptops are only worth around $1000-1400 so that's the loss if it fails after 3 years. They can be sold on right now and replaced with refurbs with warranties:

http://store.apple.com/us/product/FD103LL/A/refurbished-macbook-pro-23ghz-quad-core-intel-i7
http://store.apple.com/us/product/FC975LL/A/refurbished-macbook-pro-23ghz-quad-core-intel-i7-with-retina-display

and those warranties can be extended to another 3 years. There's no sense in holding onto old technology until it gives up and then mourning the huge initial outlay. If people keep selling and upgrading, that doesn't happen.

While there's no 17" model any more, the rMBP offers the same working resolution so eventually people will just have to get over it because the machines won't hold out forever.

 

While that is true, it's annoying to have to make the switch based on a guessing game of whether something will fail. Sometimes it's not an ideal time for an expensive purchase. I also do not personally like the idea of pawning off a ticking time bomb on someone else. Whenever someone does ask, I suggest they be careful about used computer purchases. Typically it's a matter of considering potential repair and service when you want to decide on an upper price limit. Batteries are a prime example, because it's a bad idea to leave a failing battery in the machine. Battery service can range from roughly $130-200 depending on the machine, so it's important to take that under consideration if you intend to purchase a notebook that is 2 or more years old with the original battery.

 

On a side note, I use a notebook quite a bit of the time, especially for lighter tasks and due to portability. In terms of notebooks, it's more interesting to go for one with integrated graphics assuming they are reasonably powerful. I don't know why people always compare it just in terms of discrete to integrated. A 750m for all practical purposes does not deliver bleeding edge performance in anything. It's merely one of the higher specced options if a mobile solution is a necessity.

post #101 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by Smallwheels View Post

I quickly learned that the company stifles dissent no matter how justified it is. They delete threads all over the place.

It doesn't make much sense that a company would leave something with such negative PR in a place closely associated with their company. Their forum is a support forum where people can find solutions from other Mac users. There isn't a solution to the problem that can be fixed via the forum, it's a hardware problem. These kind of complaints are better suited for 3rd party forums like this. That's not to say they are covering up a big problem as described below.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Smallwheels View Post

It is a hardware issue that is pervasive. Someone in Apple who has authority has already made the decision that they won't deal with this problem fairly. There is no way that this many failures hasn't been brought to the attention of upper management. They have decided that if you are out of warranty you are out of luck.

Nobody knows how many failures there are. Saying 'this many' is meaningless. If a forum has 100 pages of comments with 20 unique complaints per page, that's 2000 failures out of a potential 3 million customers (0.07% failure rate).

If they decide to fix some, where does it end? Do they commit to fixing every defect that occurs with similar symptoms after 4 years/5 years/6 years? There were people with the 8600M GT failure complaining just this year:

http://forums.appleinsider.com/t/142372/problem-with-macbook-pro-nvidia-graphics-card/40#post_2453203

That's after 6 or 7 years of owning the machine, which is now barely worth $500. No company is obligated to provide free support for a product outside of warranty. If the actual failure rate isn't high then it's not as widespread a problem as a concentrated forum thread would suggest and doesn't deserve a recall or extended warranty.

Products break: hard drives, monitors, fans, power supplies. When those things break, people don't always assume there's a defect. When a GPU or motherboard fails, people immediately assume a defect and that it's Apple's problem. It might be a defect with the AMD chips getting too hot. If AMD won't refund the cost of supplies (and they can't afford to these days), Apple has to pay for someone else's fault.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Smallwheels View Post

This also reinforces the iFixit position that when machines are crammed tightly into small packages and don't have user friendly repairable parts they are prohibitively expensive to fix. How many of you would prefer to have a machine that was bigger and weighed one or even two pounds more but didn't have these cooling problems?

Nope because for one thing, the latest ones are even thinner than the 2011 models and there's no indication that they have cooling problems. There's a test here showing temps running an intense graphics benchmark for 15 minutes:

http://www.elie.im/blog/web/high-end-macbook-pro-retina-late-2013-15-benchmark

The 750M went up to 77C, Iris Pro went up to 70. There were reports of the old models going up to 90-100 degrees.
post #102 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marvin View Post




http://www.elie.im/blog/web/high-end-macbook-pro-retina-late-2013-15-benchmark

The 750M went up to 77C, Iris Pro went up to 70. There were reports of the old models going up to 90-100 degrees.

The temperatures are interesting, and quite a difference from the older models. I've still noted very few threads complaining about integrated graphics failure though. It will be interesting to see if Apple releases upgrade options on the mac pro too. Many people didn't use them as upgrades but as a source of spare parts. It's the one card I can't find on there now, but they used to carry the 5770 upgrade kit. If a gpu failed on a 1,1 through 3,1 it could be replaced at minimal cost.

post #103 of 150
I started experiencing this about two months ago on my 17" MBP and I am out of my AppleCare period. I cannot play any games or even videos as it will hard lock the computer, even after performing all of the steps listed in the post and comments.
post #104 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by Magyk View Post

I started experiencing this about two months ago on my 17" MBP and I am out of my AppleCare period. I cannot play any games or even videos as it will hard lock the computer, even after performing all of the steps listed in the post and comments.

It would be good if Apple provided a reliable solution for disabling the dedicated GPU and should be possible via a software method. This would at least give people a laptop they could work with and resell and the only downside would be reduced graphics performance in having to use the HD3000, which people are having to try using anyway to avoid crashes. It would actually be useful to have that feature in every machine with an IGP and dGPU so that a dedicated GPU could be disabled. When the OS automatically switches from the IGP to the dedicated GPU, it can change the display profile so the colors on the display can change dramatically and it changes back when it stops doing something requiring the dedicated GPU. It can happen with something as simple as a Flash video as it uses hardware acceleration.
post #105 of 150
My 2011 Macbook went from perfectly fine too totally dead in a two day period... This is definitely the problem, glad to find this article!

Unfortunately apple doesn't acknowledge the problem and said when I called that not enough people have called about the issue for them to do anything about it...'

-If you do have a problem I would recommend calling Apple and mentioning this article, it seems to be a widespread problem and seems like it deserves an Apple response... The customer service reply that "I don't for-see any type of response from Apple about a two year old machine" personally doesn't cut it for me... It's barely more than TWO YEARS OLD; thats a recent computer and with the good history of longevity in apple products, this deserves some type of response.

Call Apple Care!
post #106 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by ttrtilley View Post

 

Early 2011 MBP's are dropping like flies.

The permanent fix seems to be to re-solder the GPU with lead solder.

 


How much does this re-solder job typically cost?

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post #107 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by e1618978 View Post
 


How much does this re-solder job typically cost?


If you send one in for service, they replace the logic board. Re-soldering is not an official repair option. I think he was referring to the problems with lead-free solder, which do less for the environment than you might hope given the alternative materials used.

post #108 of 150
Apple will do the same thing they did with my PowerBook G3, nothing. The hinges broke because they were made of pot metal and it was rendered useless. Apple has a mixed record as far as Customer Service goes.
post #109 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by WhoMan View Post

Just forked $300 for a re-seating of GPU (pulling it out and re-soldering). Bad connection of GPU to logic board is the root cause of this issue.

 

Just out of curiosity, who performed the re-soldering?  Would you recommend them to anyone else?

post #110 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by micahgartman View Post
 

 

Just out of curiosity, who performed the re-soldering?  Would you recommend them to anyone else?

 

I used an established mail-order repair shop called PowerbookMedic. They are not specific about the repair they perform, and it is too early to tell how well they did it. The returned logic board looked good with mirror-polished chip heat transfer surfaces and clean, new holding glue for the GPU. It has been working fine for the past couple of weeks. Their service have been good. They are called powerbookmedic.

post #111 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by WhoMan View Post
 

I used an established mail-order repair shop called PowerbookMedic. They are not specific about the repair they perform, and it is too early to tell how well they did it. The returned logic board looked good with mirror-polished chip heat transfer surfaces and clean, new holding glue for the GPU. It has been working fine for the past couple of weeks. Their service have been good. They are called powerbookmedic.


I wonder which is better, that or a replacement logic board from Apple. If they offer out of warranty depot repair, it shouldn't be much over $300. To clarify, the reason I'm not entirely sure is that Apple's repair stock may include refurbished logic boards, and I don't know if the gpu reseating method is superior to the original process in terms of longevity.

post #112 of 150
Graphics corruption is also a widespread issue for the Macbook Pro mid-2010 15" computer, Model ID 6,2 with Intel i5 main processor and nVidia dedicated graphics chip. In fact, I came to this site today with the intent to make this issue more visible to the Mac journalist and broader user community, and was surprised to find the thread I'm posting into now!

Further details are in this Apple Discussions thread: https://discussions.apple.com/message/23555002#23555002 . This thread contains a number of screen shots from multiple users.

Apple is aware of the issue. The Genius Bar had a pre-defined diagnostics test expressly for it, and the Apple technician told me as such. Also, despite the fact that my Applecare ran out in September, Apple replaced my Logic board at no charge whatsoever. This has not resolved the issue

Most of the people participating in this discussion have the same problem, with the same model of computer, although it appears that some Mac Minis have it also. There is a concensus that the work-around is to change a setting in Energy Saver (see http://support.apple.com/kb/HT4110 ), but that runs the battery down more quickly. In other words, it's a hardware issue outside of the end user's control, which has a tangible negative impact.

Unless I'm missing something, it appears that three outcomes remain:

1) Mavericks 10.9.2 offers a fix (not a work-around)

2) Apple replaces these machines altogether (with a model that has a different hardware design, not subject to this issue)

3) Apple does nothing further, and risks its customer goodwill.

The second alternative may seem drastic and expensive (to Apple), but we didn't ask for this issue. It's not our fault. If MacOS 10.9.2 doesn't address this problem, we may have no choice but to ask them to remedy this issue by replacing our machines with equivalent current models.

post #113 of 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by WhoMan View Post
 

I used an established mail-order repair shop called PowerbookMedic. They are not specific about the repair they perform, and it is too early to tell how well they did it. The returned logic board looked good with mirror-polished chip heat transfer surfaces and clean, new holding glue for the GPU. It has been working fine for the past couple of weeks. Their service have been good. They are called powerbookmedic.

 

Thanks!!!  I've purchased a few things from them in the past—seem to be good folks.

post #114 of 150
There is an on-line petition for an Apple recall / replacement for free. Here are the links:

- Short: http://bit.ly/mbpe2011petition
- Full: https://secure.avaaz.org/en/petition/Apple_Inc_Macbook_Pro_15_17_Early_2011_Replacement_Program
post #115 of 150

Ooh, an online petition. I’m sure that will work. It’s not like they’ve never worked, ever.

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone] exists, it doesn’t deserve to.
Reply

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone] exists, it doesn’t deserve to.
Reply
post #116 of 150
Any news in this? I'm having the same problem and, since Apple isn't acknowledging it I'll have to repair it myself... It seems to me that this is a broad problem that Apple should take care of.
post #117 of 150
Took my 2011 MBPIn to the Apple Store for its second logic board in 6 months. Not sure what I'll do when my Apple Care runs out in April. I've also had to replace the power cord twice - and I'm very careful with my gear.
post #118 of 150

Unfortunately you bought a lemon.Apple really should have given you another machine long ago.

post #119 of 150
I will say again:

Only way to force Apple to do right thing (replace faulty computers) is to make this issue visible as much as possible.

First thing is to make website where future customers can get informed how many Apple computers have flaw by design which can not be repaired, how much it will cost customers to repair it, and how long it will last.

I would make site to look like real apple site but only with this information.

Only than Apple will react. You need to go termo nuclear with them to provoke reaction 1wink.gif
post #120 of 150
I had the same problem. My early 2011 MBP 15' stoppped working. This is a problem with the GPU. It's been documented on this site http://www.mbp2011.com/. it is a quality control problem of Apple Computer!!! you pay 2200$ for a computer that doesn't work after 26 months because it is not properly made and they ask you 1200$ (I,live in Brazil) to fix it. Apple made its reputation upon qualty, but this quality isn't there anymore. They're crooks!
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