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Massachusetts lawsuit accuses Apple of misusing customers' personal info - Page 2

post #41 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobbyfozz View Post
 

No he is NOT right. I simply said, "You want to possess something I own and you want it. But if I take your card (it was a manual transaction) and it turns out you are using (knowingly) a card which can't be used, and I can't collect automatically, then I have to write to you to have you pay me in some other way and I don't have your information, you have committed a crime." So in that case, I prefer to NOT do business with you because I do not know you. Whoever came up with that law (and there are a lot of them in WIS) was never a businessperson and prefers one side over the other in the transaction (that is, the businessperson takes it in the shorts). He could very well have said, "If that's the case I don't want you to sell me this because I would then have to be an asshole." But he didn't because he wasn't. You, however, have way too much time on your hands.

 

This is pretty much why consumers why consumers consistently choose chains like McDonalds and Starbucks over small businesses. Can you imagine one of those going out saying "Wisconsin privacy laws are stupid and I don't like them. I'm going to violate them!".

post #42 of 88

I thought the standard reply would be 90210. Being from a country that does not use zip codes this is the zip code that "works".

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post #43 of 88
And why do they think Apple sold their information, have the never put their zip code on any other transaction, such as a purchase from Amazon? In the UK credit agencies purchase the electoral roll from local authorities. This would be a more likely way for junk mail distributors to get their addresses.
post #44 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

...and if not thrown out then settled quickly. Discovery in a privacy case seldom comes out well IMO. There will be something somewhere that would reflect poorly on Apple. Doesn't the media always find something?

I doubt there will be any 'settling'. I simply don't believe any of this this in the first place. This is Apple not Google or Amazon we are discussing here. Since when did Apple ever 'sell' user information to a third party that you know of? By the way, it's worth mentioning to those folks in MA, I don't know about them, but I can't buy gas at a gas station with my Amex card without putting in my zip code these days.
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post #45 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobbyfozz View Post

I had a consumer come up to me in Wisconsin at my sales table who objected to me taking his address information of a credit card transaction. Said it was a violation of state law. I simply said, "Then I won't sell this to you!" He changed his mind. I should have gotten him to write on a slip of paper that he did indeed to asset in case later he changed his tune.

Did this clown object at the time this was done? Apple doesn't need freaks like this to make a bigger pile of cash (which will go mostly for the ambulance chasers).

What you did and Apple did are different. With a zip code, Apple is not obtaining your address. It is merely verifying that you know a piece of information that the card holder gave to his or her credit card company. Apple can't use that information to send you stuff in the mail. It, however, collects your address voluntarily after a sale if you register a product. I have never received mail from third parties that was likely tied to an Apple purchase. This is no different than what happens at many gas pumps.

You on the other hand asked for highly personal information. I would never give a vendor my address or phone number as a condition of sale. Often times merchants ask for my phone number, and I always decline to provide it. Regardless of what your intent might be, I simply do not think a merchant is entitled to that information. In my case, you would have lost a sale. You should also check with Visa, MasterCard, discover, or American Express. Asking for that information might violate the card companies terms and conditions. For example, many people don't know a merchant who accepts visa cannot require at least five dollars be spent to use the card.
post #46 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post

I doubt there will be any 'settling'. I simply don't believe any of this this in the first place. This is Apple not Google or Amazon we are discussing here. Since when did Apple ever 'sell' user information to a third party that you know of? By the way, it's worth mentioning to those folks in MA, I don't know about them, but I can't buy gas at a gas station with my Amex card without putting in my zip code these days.

I'm not aware of any instances where either Apple or Google sold information to a third party. I doubt you know of one even concerning Google but if you do please share it.
Amazon I've no idea about but I suspect they may.

Anyway, that's not the point. If the case is allowed to go forward with that claim in place I don't think Apple will be eager to have attorneys filing discovery requests on how Apple specifically shares information collected on it's users. It won't really matter if it's actually sold. Once those discovery orders are complied with the details will somehow"leak" to the media who's nearly guaranteed to find some juicy privacy angle for eyeballs. Before things get to that point I'm personally convinced Apple would find a way to settle it.
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post #47 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post

I doubt there will be any 'settling'. I simply don't believe any of this this in the first place. This is Apple not Google or Amazon we are discussing here. Since when did Apple ever 'sell' user information to a third party that you know of? By the way, it's worth mentioning to those folks in MA, I don't know about them, but I can't buy gas at a gas station with my Amex card without putting in my zip code these days.

I'm not aware of any instances where either Apple or Google sold information to a third party. I doubt you know of one even concerning Google but if you do please share it.
Amazon I've no idea about but I suspect they may.

Anyway, that's not the point. If the case is allowed to go forward with that claim in place I don't think Apple will be eager to have attorneys filing discovery requests on how Apple specifically shares information collected on it's users. It won't really matter if it's actually sold. Once those discovery orders are complied with the details will somehow"leak" to the media who's nearly guaranteed to find some juicy privacy angle for eyeballs. Before things get to that point I'm personally convinced Apple would find a way to settle it.

 

Does it actually work like that? Can one make a random accusation of data misuse without any evidence, and then require the defendant to prove, via a discovery process, that they did not misuse the data?

post #48 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by mistercow View Post

True for gas stations.  But I've never been asked for my zip code to verify a credit card transaction that I made in store.  However I am from California which may be different from other states such as Massachusetts.  

I've been asked my zip code and phone number at Best Buy before when I used cash, but I loudly yelled at the cashier that I was not under any obligation to provide any personal information for a cash purchase. They quit asking.

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post #49 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by muppetry View Post

Does it actually work like that? Can one make a random accusation of data misuse without any evidence, and then require the defendant to prove, via a discovery process, that they did not misuse the data?

That's what lawyers call a fishing expedition. You must be able to cite a specific incident or documentation. You cannot simply say, "turn over everything you have".

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post #50 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by muppetry View Post

Does it actually work like that? Can one make a random accusation of data misuse without any evidence, and then require the defendant to prove, via a discovery process, that they did not misuse the data?

They already suppose tohave enough proof to make the claim. It depends whether the judge agrees they met the minimum burden to order discovery on that claim. He may or may not.
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post #51 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post


I've been asked my zip code and phone number at Best Buy before when I used cash, but I loudly yelled at the cashier that I was not under any obligation to provide any personal information for a cash purchase. They quit asking.

 

Brilliant.  Yelling, at a minimum wage kid trying to do the job the boss told him/her to do.  The kid didn't make the policy, but the kid gets fired if s/he doesn't do as instructed.

 

Ya know, you can always politely decline, as I do.

 

Some say the squeaky wheel gets the oil.  But often it gets kicked a few times first.

 

Remember back in the 80's and 90's when Radio Shack used to ask everyone for name & address info with every cash purchase?  Inevitably followed by junk mail. Back then we weren't so circumspect about giving this info away. After all, with a name, it only took a telephone book to find out address and phone number.  That sort of information was (and still is) a matter of public record.


Edited by TeaEarleGreyHot - 1/18/14 at 8:55am
post #52 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by muppetry View Post

Does it actually work like that? Can one make a random accusation of data misuse without any evidence, and then require the defendant to prove, via a discovery process, that they did not misuse the data?

They already suppose tohave enough proof to make the claim. It depends whether the judge agrees they met the minimum burden to order discovery on that claim. He may or may not.

 

Agreed, but given what Apple would need to have done - either sell the zipcode data or use it to track down the customers' addresses by some other means, and then send advertising material to those addresses - actual evidence seems unlikely. I suspect that they are banking on the superficial similarity of the claim to a previously successful claim that did involve that full behavior to enable a fishing expedition. Still hard to see that passing muster.

post #53 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by TeaEarleGreyHot View Post

Brilliant.  Yelling, at a minimum wage kid trying to do the job the boss told him/her to do.  The kid didn't make the policy, but the kid gets fired if s/he doesn't do as instructed.

Ya know, you can always politely decline, as I do.

Some say the squeaky wheel gets the oil.  But often it gets kicked a few times first.

Remember back in the 80's and 90's when Radio Shack used to ask everyone for name & address info with every cash purchase?  Inevitably followed by junk mail. Back then we weren't so circumspect about giving this info away. After all, with a name, it only took a telephone book to find out address and phone number.  That sort of information was (and still is) a matter of public record.

Yelling isn't always called for, but it does have the effect of bringing a terrible store policy to the attention of everyone within earshot (including the store manager, who rushed over). Incidentally, the anger and outrage was completely spontaneous.

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post #54 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

I'm not aware of any instances where either Apple or Google sold information to a third party. I doubt you know of one even concerning Google but if you do please share it.
Amazon I've no idea about but I suspect they may.

Anyway, that's not the point. If the case is allowed to go forward with that claim in place I don't think Apple will be eager to have attorneys filing discovery requests on how Apple specifically shares information collected on it's users. It won't really matter if it's actually sold. Once those discovery orders are complied with the details will somehow"leak" to the media who's nearly guaranteed to find some juicy privacy angle for eyeballs. Before things get to that point I'm personally convinced Apple would find a way to settle it.

If I Google a product, and I turn Little Snitch off, within minutes I get sales material via email from companies selling those products, I also suddenly get ads appearing on web sites for those same products if I turn Ad Blocker off. Are you telling me Google doesn't; a) pass on my search, b) get compensated if I buy something? Really?
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post #55 of 88
While I haven't been in MA lately, whenever retailers ask me for my ZIP code, I simply tell them, "you don't need it." No one has ever insisted that I give it to them.

However, when using a credit card in a terminal (such as a gas pump), if it recognizes that I'm far from home, it does usually ask me for my ZIP.

Apple is so secretive, I have a really hard time believing that even if they collected this info that they would sell it to anybody. I'm sure that they just use it internally, perhaps so that if they get a lot of customers from a single ZIP code that's not the ZIP code the store is in, they might use that assist in new store location decisions.

This lawsuit is a waste of time. At best, they'll get Apple to stop asking for ZIP codes in MA. If there's any money, the lawyers will take almost all of it.
post #56 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post

If I Google a product, and I turn Little Snitch off, within minutes I get sales material via email from companies selling those products, I also suddenly get ads appearing on web sites for those same products if I turn Ad Blocker off. Are you telling me Google doesn't; a) pass on my search, b) get compensated if I buy something? Really?

I'm not telling you anything other than Google places ads for companies based on your interests and I'm not aware of any instances of Google selling information on users to them instead. You're the one claiming they definitely do yet still haven't offered proof of it. I don't expect you ever to do so either, but maybe I'll be surprised.

As far as doing a search and within minutes getting emails on just that subject it's never happened to me but perhaps you have a bigger target on your back. and get more personal attention. If it happened here at AI any of these other not-Google companies might be the culprit as they and other of their brethren are all following you as you probably know. Easier to just lump all online and email ads under "Google did it" I know, but some like to see the details anyway.

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EDIT: Rechecking just now there were 36 trackers in use here. Geesh.

If those aren't enough there's another 1500+ not-Google trackers that just Ghostery knows about. Google may be the one everyone talks about, but they're far from the only ad placement company and have nothing to do with data brokering AFAIK unlike many of them.
Edited by Gatorguy - 1/18/14 at 4:18pm
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post #57 of 88
Why would anyone buy zip codes from Apple?
If they wanted to send advertisements through mail, all they have to do is go here:
https://www.usps.com/business/send-mail-for-business.htm?
post #58 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by Frank Lowney View Post

Whenever I use my CC to purchase gasoline, I am asked for my zip. This is virtually SOP (standard operating procedure) these days.
Ambulance chasing lawyers will drive us all to the poor house.

Bingo.  I was reading to see if anyone else would make this point.  Apparently, these three guys in Massachusetts don't drive.

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post #59 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by RadarTheKat View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Frank Lowney View Post

Whenever I use my CC to purchase gasoline, I am asked for my zip. This is virtually SOP (standard operating procedure) these days.
Ambulance chasing lawyers will drive us all to the poor house.

Bingo.  I was reading to see if anyone else would make this point.  Apparently, these three guys in Massachusetts don't drive.

 

You didn't read far enough then. In cases where the CC processors require zip codes for authentication (such as unattended gas purchases) then this law does not apply.

post #60 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

There will be something somewhere that would reflect poorly on Apple. Doesn't the media always find something?

That's your job, isn't it? 1wink.gif

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post #61 of 88
This doesn't seem newsworthy.
post #62 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

I'm not telling you anything other than Google places ads for companies based on your interests and I'm not aware of any instances of Google selling information on users to them instead. You're the one claiming they definitely do yet still haven't offered proof of it. I don't expect you ever to do so either, but maybe I'll be surprised.

As far as doing a search and within minutes getting emails on just that subject it's never happened to me but perhaps you have a bigger target on your back. and get more personal attention. If it happened here at AI any of these other not-Google companies might be the culprit as they and other of their brethren are all following you as you probably know. Easier to just lump all online and email ads under "Google did it" I know, but some like to see the details anyway.

AppNexus
Atlas
Beanstock Media
Criteo
Facebook Connect
Facebook Exchange (FBX)
Media Innovation Group
Media Optimizer (Adobe)
New Relic
OpenX
Quantcast
Right Media
Rocket Fuel
Rubicon
ScoreCard Research Beacon
VigLink

EDIT: Rechecking just now there were 36 trackers in use here. Geesh.

If those aren't enough there's another 1500+ not-Google trackers that just Ghostery knows about. Google may be the one everyone talks about, but they're far from the only ad placement company and have nothing to do with data brokering AFAIK unlike many of them.

Gosh, I don't see Apple in that list. Kind of my point.

And again ... Why are you on this blog?
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post #63 of 88
This sounds like a load of crap. Losers.
post #64 of 88
Someone should lookup Massachusetts' Adam Christensen, Jeffrey Scolnick, and William Farrell's address (with zip code) and then sign them up on every junk mail list they can find. ;-)
post #65 of 88
I have to enter my zip code every-single-time I buy gas with a credit card. But then I live in California, so what I do I know.
post #66 of 88
If privacy is one's concern - Use Cash!
or--- Remove name from Credit Card - Don't use your sell phone because you can be tracked - Don't call any business by phone and certainly don't provide them with your address and ZIP code when you order something by phone. Here's a big one - NeVer- EvEr use a supermarket discount card - they know more about you than you - where you live, what you eat, your favorite foods and the exact time you bought a bottle of wine when you were possibly..... Stay off Facebook.

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post #67 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by jkichline View Post

First, many credit processing systems require a ZIP code to verify the credit card's authenticity. This is quite a common practice especially with the level of hacking we've seen lately with Target, etc.

Second, there's no correlation between what a legal document claims to allow and what was actually done. What's put in privacy policies is intentionally broad and usually applies only to the transaction method employed. For instance, a privacy policy on a website doesn't necessarily mean that's the same privacy policy used in a store. Who said they sold it to another party? Perhaps the ZIP code was just used to process the credit card transaction.

Third, if you're that dang paranoid, how about you use cash and wear an aluminum foil hat? Or as Sir Jonny Ive says "Aluminium Fedora"

 

Exactly! 

 

We all know this is a just a cash grab.

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post #68 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by konqerror View Post
 

 

He's right and you're admitting to a violation of state law with a penalty of $100 or damages. Read Wis. Stat. 423.401.

 

You're obviously not a regular merchant because stores do get checked and fined because of violations like this. Price labeling and scan accuracy has been a big one of late.

 

Except that you didn't real subsection 2. Which does legally allow for the recording of address, telephone etc in cases where authorization is not obtained prior to completing the purchase. 

 

As the OP said 'sales table' it sounds like a flea market, farmers market kind of situation where transactions were done 'off line'. And in such cases, even for big stores, it is totally legit. So even a Apple store that is having some kind of internet outage would be in the clear for getting such info during that period

post #69 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

In this case apparently Apple employees were still asking for a zip even with the card in hand? Doesn't mean they were doing anything particularly wrong but it is pretty unusual when you and the card are both present.

 

You and the card doesn't equal you are the owner of the card. Outside of the obvious situation where the card is in the name of Mary Guy and Gator is, well a guy, it would be hard to reject the card. Particularly if it was signed since the merchant agreements often state that merchants can't ask for an id as a condition of taking the card. Only Amex as I recall actually allows you to ask for an ID and take the card, the others actually state that you are supposed to refuse the card or, after verifying the id of the person, have them sign it in front of you (although no one generally follows this rule and just looks at the ID). Asking for the billing zip is really the only way to verify the billing address at least partially. And it quite possibly considered an allowed question since few to no one lives in an area where they are the only person in the zip

post #70 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by muppetry View Post
 

The Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court ruled back in March that it was a violation to require a zip code, then use a reverse phone book technique to figure out the customer's address, and then send direct advertising to that address. The court awarded no damages though. Similar judgements have occurred in a handful of other states. However, unless the plaintiffs can prove that Apple acted similarly - i.e. not only asked for a zip code but also figured out addresses from it to send direct advertising, or sold the information to a third party who then did that, it's hard to see how this case will succeed.

 

My guess is that they don't get that it is the whole action that is not allowed. You can ask for the zip but not go further. 

 

Although Apple likely doesn't really have to go further given that they ask for phone and address for online orders and service transactions (well phone at least). They could probably compare credit cards or email address given to get a receipt and find it a lot easier than this method. 

 

If there was anything amiss in what Apple does it's the opt in for communication. They should remove that all together from transaction systems since it is unlikely that the customer ever sees those screens as it is an internal system, workers likely don't waste time asking for confirmation and it is 'yes' by default. Something of that nature is likely why these folks believe Apple sold their info. That or they are using gmail etc and don't understand the notion of random generated usernames to build a spam database

post #71 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by lilgto64 View Post

"Forced" - so the Apple Store employee held a gun to their head? What can the store do if you say no? or make one up?
If unwanted marketing materials were hazardous I'd have been dead several times over long ago.
 

 

if the system is address verifying via the zip code you can't just make one up or the card will be declined

 

but yes to your point about giving out emails without a though

post #72 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by charlituna View Post

You and the card doesn't equal you are the owner of the card. Outside of the obvious situation where the card is in the name of Mary Guy and Gator is, well a guy, it would be hard to reject the card. Particularly if it was signed since the merchant agreements often state that merchants can't ask for an id as a condition of taking the card. Only Amex as I recall actually allows you to ask for an ID and take the card, the others actually state that you are supposed to refuse the card or, after verifying the id of the person, have them sign it in front of you (although no one generally follows this rule and just looks at the ID). Asking for the billing zip is really the only way to verify the billing address at least partially. And it quite possibly considered an allowed question since few to no one lives in an area where they are the only person in the zip

Have you been asked for the billing zip on your Amex anywhere besides an unattended gas pump or an on-line transaction? I never have, and mine is used nearly every single day, sometimes several times a day, and $Thousands every month. It might be perfectly above board for salesperson to ask for a zip code, but doing so would be really unusual just as I said. 1hmm.gif

In fact the only time my CC processor asks for a zip is when I key in a card # rather than swiping it. Oherwise if I were to ask for a zipcode it would be useless for verification purposes since the processor doesn't display it too me anyway. A salesperson keying in your zip matched to your name is almost certainly doing so for marketing purposes. I can't think of another reason right off. Useless for verification because it's neither requested nor displayed by the credit card processing company when the card is presented in person AFAIK.

EDIT: California is another state that bans the practice.
http://consumerist.com/2011/02/10/ca-supreme-court-stores-cant-ask-for-zip-code-when-you-pay-by-credit-card/

"In a unanimous decision, the court said ZIP codes are “personal identification information,” which, per existing state law, businesses are forbidden from demanding.
From the L.A. Times:
The class-action lawsuit against Williams-Sonoma Stores Inc. was brought by a woman who contended that Williams-Sonoma asked her for her ZIP code when she purchased an item with her credit card. She said the store used her name and ZIP code to identify her address and then stored the information in a database for marketing. She also contended the store had the ability to sell her information to other businesses.
Two lower courts rejected the suit, but the California Supreme Court said a ZIP code was part of a person’s address and therefore covered by the state’s Credit Card Act.

Edited by Gatorguy - 1/20/14 at 12:28pm
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post #73 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kibitzer View Post

Remember back in 2010, when three enterprising California lawyers filed a class action against Apple, claiming that they were duped by advertising when their iPads shut down after being used in hot sunlight? A few months later a judge tossed that one.
 
Apple had given out info about usage temp ranges, thus the toss
 
These suits are in the same frivolous class as the "sue McDonald's because the coffee's too hot."

 

Actually that suit was not frivolous at all. Folks like to harp on this notion that she sued because her clothes got wet. She sued because she was injured, due to that McDonalds making their coffee way above appropriate temperatures. And it turned out that it was policy at McDonalds, Starbucks and several other places. 

post #74 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by cyclonus5150 View Post

Apple asks for zip at the end of the transaction to help determine where to put new stores. Data is only shared with partners assisting in real estate strategy. Pointless lawsuit. Pointless article.

 

No they don't. They did for a while but stopped that like 2-3 years ago. Probably in part due to the fact that they had way more online transactions to cull such info from so they didn't need the stores to get them anything. 

post #75 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by TBell View Post

I have never received mail from third parties that was likely tied to an Apple purchase. 
 

 

More like, if you have, you can't prove it was from Apple and not a magazine subscription etc. One of the reasons that I have gone digital magazine as much as possible is because I can prove they were selling my address. How? Because I will intentionally mess up my name just so i can track when I get junk mail. Each new magazine I might double up a letter, leave out a letter, whatever. I keep a list on them. Every new mag at least one piece of junk mail has turned up. 

 

By the same token I don't use my real name on my Apple ID. I did the same sort of screw ups. didn't come back on me because I don't have a credit card on file (gift cards only). In 10 years I've never had a credit card offer, car insurance blah blah come to that name. 

 

Most folks don't do that kind of curiosity research so their name, email, address is all over the place. So who knows if that junk mail was from Apple or from your subscription to Tits magazine

post #76 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by muppetry View Post
 

 

Does it actually work like that? Can one make a random accusation of data misuse without any evidence, and then require the defendant to prove, via a discovery process, that they did not misuse the data?

 

Yes and no. Apple's lawyers will have to at least file a motion to dismiss. They will likely cite a lack of evidence they sold anything, combined with legal statutes and credit card contracts that give them permission to ask for zip codes for address verification. They will probably pull out some kind of evidence that the zip codes are passed to the credit servers and not recorded on the transaction journal to seal it. 

 

The lawyers for the other side will be given a chance to call BS, won't be able to prove their case and it will probably be dismissed within a week of when the first hearing happens. A month tops. 

post #77 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post


I've been asked my zip code and phone number at Best Buy before when I used cash, but I loudly yelled at the cashier that I was not under any obligation to provide any personal information for a cash purchase. They quit asking.

 

That is a time when I would agree it is uncalled for. Especially the phone number. If they insisted I would demand to speak to a manager to explain why I am no longer shopping with Best Buy. 

post #78 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by charlituna View Post

More like, if you have, you can't prove it was from Apple and not a magazine subscription etc. One of the reasons that I have gone digital magazine as much as possible is because I can prove they were selling my address. How? Because I will intentionally mess up my name just so i can track when I get junk mail. Each new magazine I might double up a letter, leave out a letter, whatever. I keep a list on them. Every new mag at least one piece of junk mail has turned up.

LOL, I've done exactly the same thing to help figure out who shared my contact info and with who.
melior diabolus quem scies
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post #79 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by iaeen View Post

Why would anyone buy zip codes from Apple?
If they wanted to send advertisements through mail, all they have to do is go here:
https://www.usps.com/business/send-mail-for-business.htm?

 

Cheaper to send fewer, more fine tuned, mailers than blanket everyone. Someone might be wanting to appeal to the type of folks that would buy from Apple. Although with everyone buying iPhones etc these days, that 'exclusive, upper crust' notion is far gone. Maybe back in the day when it was just the 'overpriced' computers. 

post #80 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post


LOL, I've done exactly the same thing to help figure out who shared my contact info and with who.

 

probably not a shock that tabloid mags are the biggest offenders. TV guide and sports illustrated follow close behind from what I can tell. 

 

My last move I cancelled everything and went emag for what I really had to have. Or just read it at the library across the street. 

 

Now if I could just get rid of the excess store flyers. I don't mind getting from the two shops I go to. Or Bed Bath and Beyond cause of the coupons. But the rest can hang

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