or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › General › General Discussion › Coca-Cola mulls deployment of Apple's iBeacon at World Cup and beyond
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Coca-Cola mulls deployment of Apple's iBeacon at World Cup and beyond - Page 2

post #41 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by saltyzip View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by jungmark View Post

It's an opt-in. Don't want to be bombarded? Don't download use the app.

For Google, it's an opt-out and if you do then Google will find away to track you anyways.

When on can you not filter by store, so only allow notifications from certain stores, or is it just a free for all?

When using Apple's iBeacon protocol, the app uses Location Services to request filtering by:
  1. UUID
  2. Major ID (optional)
  3. Minor ID (optional)
  4. Range

UUID is an unique ID assigned by the creator of the app -- typically it will represent an enterprise, such as Apple.

Major ID might be used to represent store #15, say Apple Palo Alto

Minor ID might be used to represent aisle #3 in store #15, say the iMac display,

Range is Immediate: 1-2 feet;  Near: 4-8 feet;  Far: 8-200 feet; Out-of-range: > 200 feet. These are approximate -- more accuracy the nearer the iBeacon.


Here's a scenario:
  1. Say you are going San Francisco.
  2. You ask someone like a Yelp app "what are the top 20 Italian restaurants" in whatever area (zip code xxxxx)
  3. The Yelp app on your iPhone contacts the Yelp website and gets the UUID and (optional) Major ID for the top-rated Italian restaurants in the area
  4. The iPhone app begins listening for only these locations.
  5. You opt-in to receive alerts and push notifications

If you come in range of any of these restaurants, you receive an alert if the app is running in the foreground or a push notification if the app is running in the background.

The experience is similar to receiving iMessages.
Edited by Dick Applebaum - 1/18/14 at 1:24pm
"...The calm is on the water and part of us would linger by the shore, For ships are safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for."
- Michael Lille -
Reply
"...The calm is on the water and part of us would linger by the shore, For ships are safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for."
- Michael Lille -
Reply
post #42 of 87

How do you turn the dang thing off? I work a block away from an Apple store and my iPhone thinks I'm in there to shop- keeps displaying my Apple gift card in passbook on my home screen , etc.

post #43 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

The short answer is No, iBeacons cannot track you!

Here's why:
  1. iBeacons use Bluetooth 4.0 which is different from earlier Bluetooth -- no pairing, no need for 2-way communication or data exchange
  2. you can listen only for iBeacons -- the iBeacon cannot detect that you are listening
  3. you can turn off WiFi and Cell radios on your iDevice so the app detecting an iBeacon cannot "phone home"
  4. an iOS app listening for iBeacons uses Apple Location Services
  5. you have to opt-in to allow the app to use Location Services
  6. you have to opt-in to receive push notifications (the app "phones home" and the app on the "home computer" sends you a push notification
  7. you have to have installed the app on your device, launched it and opted-in

Sure, I understand that the iBeacon sending device itself does not receive your info but the sending device needs a matching app on your mobile device in order to work. With regard to #3, who turns off their wifi and cell services? BLE does not provide transmission for large data so any decent looking advertisement that would display pictures, barcodes, CSS styles, etc, would likely have to get that data from the Internet somehow. Doesn't that mean that the app is phoning home during normal usage? So I would say, the short answer is, yes, the iBeacon providers do have the ability to track you once you have opted in. 

 

It is different than regular anonymous web browsing in that the iBeacon partner app likely knows your personal information because you probably had to register and the app automatically logs you in when launched. So in real world situations, the app probably won't work very well, if at all, with the network turned off. At least that is how I would design the app. When you combine that with location services you should probably expect to be tracked.

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

Reply

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

Reply
post #44 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by pazuzu View Post

How do you turn the dang thing off? I work a block away from an Apple store and my iPhone thinks I'm in there to shop- keeps displaying my Apple gift card in passbook on my home screen , etc.

Terminate the App Store app from the Task Bar, or go to Settings--->Location Services--->Apple Store and toggle the setting to Off.

This is a new technology, so you may need to reboot your iPhone (st this stage of implementation).

In iOS 7 all iBeacon listening gets pushed down to the Bluetooth radio to conserve bandwidth and battery. An app using iBeacons is suppose to follow a protocol which includes "stop listening" -- but, hey, nobody's perfect!

The nearest Apple Store is 30 miles, so I can't verify if the Apple Store app works correctly.

However, with the iBeacon apps I am testing you can successfully turn it off by terminating the app.
"...The calm is on the water and part of us would linger by the shore, For ships are safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for."
- Michael Lille -
Reply
"...The calm is on the water and part of us would linger by the shore, For ships are safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for."
- Michael Lille -
Reply
post #45 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

The short answer is No, iBeacons cannot track you!


Here's why:
  1. iBeacons use Bluetooth 4.0 which is different from earlier Bluetooth -- no pairing, no need for 2-way communication or data exchange
  2. you can listen only for iBeacons -- the iBeacon cannot detect that you are listening
  3. you can turn off WiFi and Cell radios on your iDevice so the app detecting an iBeacon cannot "phone home"
  4. an iOS app listening for iBeacons uses Apple Location Services
  5. you have to opt-in to allow the app to use Location Services
  6. you have to opt-in to receive push notifications (the app "phones home" and the app on the "home computer" sends you a push notification
  7. you have to have installed the app on your device, launched it and opted-in
Sure, I understand that the iBeacon sending device itself does not receive your info but the sending device needs a matching app on your mobile device in order to work. With regard to #3, who turns off their wifi and cell services? BLE does not provide transmission for large data so any decent looking advertisement that would display pictures, barcodes, CSS styles, etc, would likely have to get that data from the Internet somehow. Doesn't that mean that the app is phoning home during normal usage? So I would say, the short answer is, yes, the iBeacon providers do have the ability to track you once you have opted in. 

Well... There is no guarantee that the app running on the iDevice always has access to WiFi or Cell services ("normal usage") -- you could be in a mall, hospital, etc. A more user-friendly app would get the data from the Internet when installed/updated on the iDevice... or when launched at home or the office, prior to going out and about -- where WiFi and Cell services are known to be available.

Then while shopping, the iDevice app could at a minimum display data from within the app when triggered by a nearby iBeacon.

For some uses, it would be advantageous to access the Internet during "normal usage". But you should be able to use most apps without "phoning home" or tracking.

For example, you can use Google Maps/Street View without opting-in to enable Location Services (assuming that Google is playing by the rules). Why shouldn't you be able to use an indoor shopping app without opting-in?

Quote:
It is different than regular anonymous web browsing in that the iBeacon partner app likely knows your personal information because you probably had to register and the app automatically logs you in when launched. So in real world situations, the app probably won't work very well, if at all, with the network turned off. At least that is how I would design the app. When you combine that with location services you should probably expect to be tracked.

I think I would design the app for both opt-in and opt-out. The opt-in scenario is as you say.

But for those concerned, let them download the data before shopping, listen for iBeacons, receive alerts/offers then checkout paying cash or CC Token -- never accessing the Internet, never disclosing personal data and never being tracked.

One of the "demo apps" I've seen allows you to:
  • locate a nearby restaurant
  • make a reservation, e.g Pooh Bear party of 5
  • check in
  • order
  • receive coupons/discounts etc/
  • checkout and pay

without ever identifying yourself.
"...The calm is on the water and part of us would linger by the shore, For ships are safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for."
- Michael Lille -
Reply
"...The calm is on the water and part of us would linger by the shore, For ships are safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for."
- Michael Lille -
Reply
post #46 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

Terminate the App Store app from the Task Bar, or go to Settings--->Location Services--->Apple Store and toggle the setting to Off.

This is a new technology, so you may need to reboot your iPhone (st this stage of implementation).

In iOS 7 all iBeacon listening gets pushed down to the Bluetooth radio to conserve bandwidth and battery. An app using iBeacons is suppose to follow a protocol which includes "stop listening" -- but, hey, nobody's perfect!

The nearest Apple Store is 30 miles, so I can't verify if the Apple Store app works correctly.

However, with the iBeacon apps I am testing you can successfully turn it off by terminating the app.

He's making that up. He's a concern troll.

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

 

Goodbyeee jragosta :: http://forums.appleinsider.com/t/160864/jragosta-joseph-michael-ragosta

Reply

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

 

Goodbyeee jragosta :: http://forums.appleinsider.com/t/160864/jragosta-joseph-michael-ragosta

Reply
post #47 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post
 
without ever identifying yourself.

Admittedly everything I know about iBeacons, I have learned in the past few hours, so I'm definitely not an authority on the subject. I followed the first link you posted http://estimote.com which clearly displays the personalization of the iBeacon advertisement. From that I assumed that this was common usage. 

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

Reply

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

Reply
post #48 of 87

I've seen a few instances of iBeacons in use or in trials.  The best use case I've seen is for micro-location information.  Imagine a museum where you get a tour as you walk into each room, including specific text/media for individual pieces. 

 

At CES, they had a geocaching like game where you went to specific places to collect points which then entered you into a contest.

 

At an Apple store an iBeacon was set up so that when you walked towards the Genius bar, the wait time was automatically sent.  While this could've been just a display, it could also the allow you to put your name in and be notified when your reservation was ready.

 

There are other ways that iBeacons can function that aren't just passive either.  For example, you could have an app for a mall, airport or whatever that allowed indoor navigation along with info for specific things... "Notify me if I'm near a bathroom, ATM, or where I could buy a bottle of water". 

 

I'm not sure what Coke is planning.  It might be games, it might be navigation, or something else, but I doubt that it's just an app that when installed, it spams you with "buy a Coke" messages.

post #49 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

Sure, I understand that the iBeacon sending device itself does not receive your info but the sending device needs a matching app on your mobile device in order to work. With regard to #3, who turns off their wifi and cell services? BLE does not provide transmission for large data so any decent looking advertisement that would display pictures, barcodes, CSS styles, etc, would likely have to get that data from the Internet somehow. Doesn't that mean that the app is phoning home during normal usage? So I would say, the short answer is, yes, the iBeacon providers do have the ability to track you once you have opted in. 

It is different than regular anonymous web browsing in that the iBeacon partner app likely knows your personal information because you probably had to register and the app automatically logs you in when launched. So in real world situations, the app probably won't work very well, if at all, with the network turned off. At least that is how I would design the app. When you combine that with location services you should probably expect to be tracked.

1) As it's been stated before, the device, like an iPhone, can only listen. I suppose one could make a system that listens for various other BT (or WiFI or cellular) data from phones, notebooks, tablets, smart bands, headsets, or anything else that emits a single, and then could map out your movement but that has been true since wireless technologies existed.

2) From what I can tell there is no info being sent directly from the iBeacon transponder. It's only a unique ID. The app on your device has to read that unique ID and then get the data either from within the app or query a server for it. This is how iBeacons can be so inexpensive to deploy. You don't need to have a complex and fast internet connection to an iBeacon. You don't need to have storage on the iBeacon. You don't need to have a way to update the iBeacon periodically either remotely or in person. All you have to do is build a simple, low-power iBeacon, record it's unique ID, then deploy it somewhere.

This means that you can deploy an iBeacon at the entrance of a museum and have it say "Welcome to blah blah blah. Here is some info you may want as you enter" Then they can update the data the app responds to for that particular iBeacon sensor by updating the app itself so now it says "Welcome to blah blah blah. Click this link for a map or our facility bleach blah blah" and then later update the app again to be localized for any number of languages and on and on and on. The way you make it sounds it would take a Mac Pro with a Pegasus TV RAID attached for a busy iBeacon location to work. This is one-way, low-power, and simple.

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

 

Goodbyeee jragosta :: http://forums.appleinsider.com/t/160864/jragosta-joseph-michael-ragosta

Reply

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

 

Goodbyeee jragosta :: http://forums.appleinsider.com/t/160864/jragosta-joseph-michael-ragosta

Reply
post #50 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by macslut View Post

There are other ways that iBeacons can function that aren't just passive either.  For example, you could have an app for a mall, airport or whatever that allowed indoor navigation along with info for specific things... "Notify me if I'm near a bathroom, ATM, or where I could buy a bottle of water". 

I'm not sure what Coke is planning.  It might be games, it might be navigation, or something else, but I doubt that it's just an app that when installed, it spams you with "buy a Coke" messages.

I like that. It would be great to be somewhere unfamiliar and have it list a bunch of different services you can set for iBeacons to respond to. Like we use(d) TomTom for when you need food, gas or lodging, but at a comparatively micro-level.

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

 

Goodbyeee jragosta :: http://forums.appleinsider.com/t/160864/jragosta-joseph-michael-ragosta

Reply

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

 

Goodbyeee jragosta :: http://forums.appleinsider.com/t/160864/jragosta-joseph-michael-ragosta

Reply
post #51 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post
 
The way you make it sounds it would take a Mac Pro with a Pegasus TV RAID attached for a busy iBeacon location to work. This is one-way, low-power, and simple.

Understood about the low power and one-way communication but not at all my point. In order for the iBeacon to be of any value to the advertiser, it needs enticing personalized ads which I am presuming live on a server somewhere on the Internet which your phone downloads after receiving the iBeacon ID using either cell or wifi on the mobile device not the iBeacon itself.


Edited by mstone - 1/18/14 at 3:34pm

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

Reply

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

Reply
post #52 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

Understood about the low power and one-way communication but not at all my point. In order for the iBeacon to be a any value to the advertiser, it needs enticing personalized ads which I am presuming live on a server somewhere on the Internet.

Why presume that? Why does a museum, fair, etc. need to only have ads? Why does all this need to be on a server instead already built into an app?

Imagine being at Coachella and being able to pinpoint anything listed in their app (band, stage, food, beverage, bathroom, specific beer vendor) down to the direction and distance instantly without having any barring of where you currently are. You need a bathroom quickly, you can find the closest one without having to remember where you are, how far it was from the last one, what you remember on the map, etc. Of course, the whole place in a bathroom and the lines at their portable toilets are long so any emergency will have soiled your trousers long before you can get through the queue, but you see my point.

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

 

Goodbyeee jragosta :: http://forums.appleinsider.com/t/160864/jragosta-joseph-michael-ragosta

Reply

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

 

Goodbyeee jragosta :: http://forums.appleinsider.com/t/160864/jragosta-joseph-michael-ragosta

Reply
post #53 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

 
Admittedly everything I know about iBeacons, I have learned in the past few hours, so I'm definitely not an authority on the subject. I followed the first link you posted http://estimote.com
 which clearly displays the personalization of the iBeacon advertisement. From that I assumed that this was common usage. 

Yeah...

You can do "personalization" and tracking which is great for some use cases.

Not every is comfortable with that, however!


Another way to look it is iBeacons can provide [trigger] information in "context" -- when you are near to something that you are interested in it can alert an guide you.

Say you are shopping for mens' shoes at Nordstroms (and have indicated that to the shopping App). The App could:
  • alert you when you approach the store
  • guide to the mens' department when you enter the store
  • guide you to the mens' shoes aisles
  • display the specifics about various shoe SKUs as you approach them

It can do this without knowing anything about you personally -- rather, you have told the app the "context" of what interests you for this particular shopping trip.

Here is an interesting video by the founder of Estimote:

at about 10 minutes in, he discusses "context".



However, "personalization", tracking and analytics could be highly beneficial to both the customer and the store -- customer willing!

The key is for the store to make it worthwhile for the customer.


We are so early in the game, right now, that no one knows how it will manifest itself...

PayPal has announced PayPal Beacons!

http://techcrunch.com/2013/09/09/paypal-debuts-its-newest-hardware-beacon-a-bluetooth-le-enabled-device-for-hands-free-check-ins-and-payments/


Apple has patented a method for Point Of Sale that could be used anonymous checkout:

http://appleinsider.com/articles/14/01/16/apple-details-secure-over-the-air-e-wallet-strategy-in-patent-filing
"...The calm is on the water and part of us would linger by the shore, For ships are safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for."
- Michael Lille -
Reply
"...The calm is on the water and part of us would linger by the shore, For ships are safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for."
- Michael Lille -
Reply
post #54 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post
 
 
Why presume that? Why does a museum, fair, etc. need to only have ads? Why does all this need to be on a server instead already built into an app?
 

Sure there are different usage case scenarios such as a unique event that all the assets could be stored in the mobile device and need no personalization but another probably more common usage might be entering a retail establishment where today's sale items are presented. I wouldn't expect users to have to install an update to the entire app just to see today's sales. They would be downloading a new app everyday. The logical solution in my mind is to have the app access new data from the internet based on user profile.

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

Reply

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

Reply
post #55 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

Sure, I understand that the iBeacon sending device itself does not receive your info but the sending device needs a matching app on your mobile device in order to work. With regard to #3, who turns off their wifi and cell services? BLE does not provide transmission for large data so any decent looking advertisement that would display pictures, barcodes, CSS styles, etc, would likely have to get that data from the Internet somehow. Doesn't that mean that the app is phoning home during normal usage? So I would say, the short answer is, yes, the iBeacon providers do have the ability to track you once you have opted in. 

It is different than regular anonymous web browsing in that the iBeacon partner app likely knows your personal information because you probably had to register and the app automatically logs you in when launched. So in real world situations, the app probably won't work very well, if at all, with the network turned off. At least that is how I would design the app. When you combine that with location services you should probably expect to be tracked.

1) As it's been stated before, the device, like an iPhone, can only listen. I suppose one could make a system that listens for various other BT (or WiFI or cellular) data from phones, notebooks, tablets, smart bands, headsets, or anything else that emits a single, and then could map out your movement but that has been true since wireless technologies existed.

2) From what I can tell there is no info being sent directly from the iBeacon transponder. It's only a unique ID. The app on your device has to read that unique ID and then get the data either from within the app or query a server for it. This is how iBeacons can be so inexpensive to deploy. You don't need to have a complex and fast internet connection to an iBeacon. You don't need to have storage on the iBeacon. You don't need to have a way to update the iBeacon periodically either remotely or in person. All you have to do is build a simple, low-power iBeacon, record it's unique ID, then deploy it somewhere.

This means that you can deploy an iBeacon at the entrance of a museum and have it say "Welcome to blah blah blah. Here is some info you may want as you enter" Then they can update the data the app responds to for that particular iBeacon sensor by updating the app itself so now it says "Welcome to blah blah blah. Click this link for a map or our facility bleach blah blah" and then later update the app again to be localized for any number of languages and on and on and on. The way you make it sounds it would take a Mac Pro with a Pegasus TV RAID attached for a busy iBeacon location to work. This is one-way, low-power, and simple.

Very well said!
"...The calm is on the water and part of us would linger by the shore, For ships are safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for."
- Michael Lille -
Reply
"...The calm is on the water and part of us would linger by the shore, For ships are safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for."
- Michael Lille -
Reply
post #56 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

Sure there are different usage case scenarios such as a unique event that all the assets could be stored in the mobile device and need no personalization but another probably more common usage might be entering a retail establishment where today's sale items are presented. I wouldn't expect users to have to install an update to the entire app just to see today's sales. They would be downloading a new app everyday. The logical solution in my mind is to have the app access new data from the internet based on user profile.

Sure, but that's just one way to go. For instance, I shop at CVS and they send me great deals via email. I click once on the email to open it up in a web view and then again to send it to my card. It's then there on their PoS systems when I go to pay. It's a very easy way to get 20-25% off. The problem is I usually forget about them. If I had been reminded when I walked into the store that I have a valid discount for 25% off as noted by their CVS app I may spend more than I would otherwise. It would certainly get me out of the very focused reason I was in the store in the first place.

Now they could also give me a link to a current flyer with couponless and couponed deals which I may very well click if I am already looking at their iBeacon which then takes me to the app. At that point I would expect that to download to my phone in a few seconds. I would then probably give it a quick look for anything that sticks out.

Only major changes would require an app update, not ones that happen on a daily to weekly basis. Even something that is revolving, like different deals at restaurants for different days, could be local to the app but simply check the day of the week on your system so it knows which ad(s) to provide you.


- - - - -

Perhaps the biggest risk is someone mapping out the iBeacons paid for by others and then piggybacking on them. For instance, what if Walgreens maps out the IDs of all of CVS's iBeacons so when you are in a CVS your Walgreens apps pops up and says "Hey, we've got a better deal at Walgreens" or "Come to Walgreens blah blah blah." That could get annoying. The reason I don't see that as being an issue is as soon as it's abused you can delete the Walgreens app (or just turn off iBeacons for it), and if you turn off all iBeacons or BT Walgreens doesn't win anything. All they've done is spent a lot of money mapping out a competitor when they could have used it for their own stores. On top of that you're already in CVS and you're probably now annoyed with Walgreens so it's not a good move. Let's remember that these are proximal sensors that also require an app so you're already a customer in some fashion.
Edited by SolipsismX - 1/18/14 at 3:55pm

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

 

Goodbyeee jragosta :: http://forums.appleinsider.com/t/160864/jragosta-joseph-michael-ragosta

Reply

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

 

Goodbyeee jragosta :: http://forums.appleinsider.com/t/160864/jragosta-joseph-michael-ragosta

Reply
post #57 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

Sure, but that's just one way to go. For instance, I shop at CVS and they send me great deals via email. I click once on the email to open it up in a web view and then again to send it to my card. It's then there on their PoS systems when I go to pay. It's a very easy way to get 20-25% off. The problem is I usually forget about them. If I had been reminded when I walked into the store that I have a valid discount for 25% off as noted by their CVS app I may spend more than I would otherwise. It would certainly get me out of the very focused reason I was in the store in the first place.

Now they could also give me a link to a current flyer with couponless and couponed deals which I may very well click if I am already looking at their iBeacon which then takes me to the app. At that point I would expect that to download to my phone in a few seconds. I would then probably give it a quick look for anything that sticks out.

Only major changes would require an app update, not ones that happen on a daily to weekly basis. Even something that is revolving, like different deals at restaurants for different days, could be local to the app but simply check the day of the week on your system so it knows which ad(s) to provide you.

Well we will just have to leave it at that. I am convinced that Internet delivery of assets and personalization needs to be an integral  part of the iBeacon experience in most retail implementations where the data changes regularly. Say for example you are driving by your CVS and you remember that you need toothpaste. You walk into the store and your iBeacon app is out of date, hence in order to see today's specials you have to update the entire app over the cell network. Sounds really awkward to me. Instead your CVS app should just query the sever for the minimal additional assets that you need based on your user profile.

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

Reply

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

Reply
post #58 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

 

Why presume that? Why does a museum, fair, etc. need to only have ads? Why does all this need to be on a server instead already built into an app?

 
Sure there are different usage case scenarios such as a unique event that all the assets could be stored in the mobile device and need no personalization but another probably more common usage might be entering a retail establishment where today's sale items are presented. I wouldn't expect users to have to install an update to the entire app just to see today's sales. They would be downloading a new app everyday. The logical solution in my mind is to have the app access new data from the internet based on user profile.

Yep!

Apps get installed/updated automatically from the App store.

I could see the app asking the user if he want's to see "today's specials" if a Internet connection is available (and logging the request if not available).

I can see some "user profile" information stored in the app -- size, color/style/brand preferences...


But, when I go to Macy's, I don't always go there to shop for ties -- I may be shopping for women's watches on this trip -- so a "profile" of interests may not be of use for an efficient shopping trip -- more of an irritant, actually.

On the other hand, there are times that I just want to browse and see what's new -- a profile of my interests would be quite useful.


...Some are some, and some are not!


On the other other hand, if I were taking the Metro in Paris, it would be nice to be alerted as we approach various stations -- in English, in my case!
"...The calm is on the water and part of us would linger by the shore, For ships are safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for."
- Michael Lille -
Reply
"...The calm is on the water and part of us would linger by the shore, For ships are safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for."
- Michael Lille -
Reply
post #59 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

You walk into the store […] in order to see today's specials […] your CVS app should just query the sever

You know that's what I wrote, right?

You seem to be coming at this as an all-or-nothing solution when it's just a way for specific apps to generate a message to you at a particular location. It's a pretty slick and very, very scalable solution that not only will work for iOS but for any OS and apps that wants to use the iBeacons already setup (the only problem is there are relatively so few non-iPhones that have BT4.0).

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

 

Goodbyeee jragosta :: http://forums.appleinsider.com/t/160864/jragosta-joseph-michael-ragosta

Reply

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

 

Goodbyeee jragosta :: http://forums.appleinsider.com/t/160864/jragosta-joseph-michael-ragosta

Reply
post #60 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

I may be shopping for women's watches on this trip!

To each their own. I'm not judging. I'm sure they look lovely on you. 1wink.gif
Edited by SolipsismX - 1/18/14 at 4:14pm

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

 

Goodbyeee jragosta :: http://forums.appleinsider.com/t/160864/jragosta-joseph-michael-ragosta

Reply

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

 

Goodbyeee jragosta :: http://forums.appleinsider.com/t/160864/jragosta-joseph-michael-ragosta

Reply
post #61 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

Sure, but that's just one way to go. For instance, I shop at CVS and they send me great deals via email. I click once on the email to open it up in a web view and then again to send it to my card. It's then there on their PoS systems when I go to pay. It's a very easy way to get 20-25% off. The problem is I usually forget about them. If I had been reminded when I walked into the store that I have a valid discount for 25% off as noted by their CVS app I may spend more than I would otherwise. It would certainly get me out of the very focused reason I was in the store in the first place.


Now they could also give me a link to a current flyer with couponless and couponed deals which I may very well click if I am already looking at their iBeacon which then takes me to the app. At that point I would expect that to download to my phone in a few seconds. I would then probably give it a quick look for anything that sticks out.


Only major changes would require an app update, not ones that happen on a daily to weekly basis. Even something that is revolving, like different deals at restaurants for different days, could be local to the app but simply check the day of the week on your system so it knows which ad(s) to provide you.
Well we will just have to leave it at that. I am convinced that Internet delivery of assets and personalization needs to be an integral  part of the iBeacon experience in most retail implementations where the data changes regularly. Say for example you are driving by your CVS and you remember that you need toothpaste. You walk into the store and your iBeacon app is out of date, hence in order to see today's specials you have to update the entire app over the cell network. Sounds really awkward to me. Instead your CVS app should just query the sever for the minimal additional assets that you need based on your user profile.

You are likely correct for many use cases. In fact, iBeacons are likely to be an integral part of the Internet-of-Things!

However, there are places where the Internet is not available -- say a tour of Machu Picchu or the subway... or, sometimes in the store where you are shopping... Or if the server is down...

There are places I remember
All my life
Though some have changed
Some forever
Not for better
Some have gone
And some remain
All these places have their moments
With lovers and friends
I still can recall
Some are dead and some are living
In my life
I've loved them all
Edited by Dick Applebaum - 1/18/14 at 4:29pm
"...The calm is on the water and part of us would linger by the shore, For ships are safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for."
- Michael Lille -
Reply
"...The calm is on the water and part of us would linger by the shore, For ships are safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for."
- Michael Lille -
Reply
post #62 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

You are likely correct for many use cases. In fact, iBeacons are likely to be an integral part of the Internet-of-Things!

However, there are places where the Internet is not available -- say a tour of Machu Picchu or the subway...

That never even crossed my mind since I like to believe the future includes internet everywhere, but you're right. Places could have these great automated, auditory guides that are available in the app to be activated by an app when you get close to certain areas. No need for those clunky headphone sets you see in museums that require you to keep a certain pace or start/stop the playback. The one you linked you has a 2 year battery and says the case is designed to be waterproof, even submerged under water.

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

 

Goodbyeee jragosta :: http://forums.appleinsider.com/t/160864/jragosta-joseph-michael-ragosta

Reply

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

 

Goodbyeee jragosta :: http://forums.appleinsider.com/t/160864/jragosta-joseph-michael-ragosta

Reply
post #63 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

You know that's what I wrote, right?

Perhaps I am misunderstanding your explanation but it is important to clarify that the iBeacon only sends a very small data set of a few key/value pairs to the phone at which point, the phone needs to do the rest on its own. If you are suggesting that all of the work is done by the app alone without a connection to the internet, then the app will be huge and likely out of date since today's specials change everyday. The app should just be a lightweight shell which almost never needs to be updated and gets all the variable data from the Internet. It is the Internet server that holds your recent purchases, your personal info and the images of products the server's database thinks you might be interested in. In that way the iBeacon can change from hour to hour without requiring you to download an entire app update each time.

 

Right now the iBeacon device is typically a static transponder but it is also possible to make an iBeacon running on a computer that could change the promotion instantly depending on the time of day or catch of the day or whatever. That kind of robust interface would require the mobile device to have Internet access in order to work.

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

Reply

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

Reply
post #64 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

Perhaps I am misunderstanding your explanation but it is important to clarify that the iBeacon only sends a very small data set of a few key/value pairs to the phone at which point, the phone needs to do the rest on its own. If you are suggesting that all of the work is done by the app alone without a connection to the internet, then the app will be huge and likely out of date since today's specials change everyday. The app should just be a lightweight shell which almost never needs to be updated and gets all the variable data from the Internet. It is the Internet server that holds your recent purchases, your personal info and the images of products the server's database thinks you might be interested in. In that way the iBeacon can change from hour to hour without requiring you to download an entire app update each time.

Right now the iBeacon device is typically a static transponder but it is also possible to make an iBeacon running on a computer that could change the promotion instantly depending on the time of day or catch of the day or whatever. That kind of robust interface would require the mobile device to have Internet access in order to work.

I previously wrote, "Now they could also give me a link to a current flyer with couponless and couponed deals which I may very well click if I am already looking at their iBeacon which then takes me to the app. At that point I would expect that to download to my phone in a few seconds. I would then probably give it a quick look for anything that sticks out."

I thought I was clear that the app could have local info as well as offer a way to get other info from the internet, like recent coupons and deals. This is not the app just being a shell. This is not requiring iBeacons to be portable web servers. This is not requiring a huge amount of data to be downloaded and it would only be done at the user's request. How much does data does a PDF flyer take need?

Again, there is no need for the iBeacon itself to change. It's unique ID will remain the same but how the app responds to that unique ID can change through an app update or through polling a server for additional data. There is absolutely no reason to have the iBeacon to be eunning on a computer. All the processing is happening on your handheld device via the app or on a server that is talking to your app on your handheld device.
Edited by SolipsismX - 1/18/14 at 4:39pm

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

 

Goodbyeee jragosta :: http://forums.appleinsider.com/t/160864/jragosta-joseph-michael-ragosta

Reply

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

 

Goodbyeee jragosta :: http://forums.appleinsider.com/t/160864/jragosta-joseph-michael-ragosta

Reply
post #65 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

I previously wrote, "Now they could also give me a link to a current flyer with couponless and couponed deals which I may very well click if I am already looking at their iBeacon which then takes me to the app. At that point I would expect that to download to my phone in a few seconds. I would then probably give it a quick look for anything that sticks out."

I thought I was clear that the app could have local info as well as offer a way to get other info from the internet, like recent coupons and deals. This is not the app just being a shell. This is not requiring iBeacons to be portable web servers. This is not requiring a huge amount of data to be downloaded and it would only be done at the user's request. How much does data does a PDF flyer take need?

Again, there is no need for the iBeacon itself to change. It's unique ID will remain the same but how the app responds to that unique ID can change. By an app update or through polling a server. There is absolutely no reason to have the iBeacon to be running on a computer. All the processing is happening on your handheld device via the app or on a server that is talking to your app on your handheld device.

Nope. We are miles apart. The ID can be the same but the other key/value pairs can change dynamically which requires a computer or statically by reprogramming the dumb transponder. By getting data from the Internet I do not mean there is a link for a web browser. What I am referring to is the store's app displays the the data much like a web browser but it is running inside the app. That way you see the full advertisement layout without having to click on anything. All the fonts, colors, images, your personal greeting, all displayed in the app automatically using assets downloaded from the Internet. No clicking involved.

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

Reply

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

Reply
post #66 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

You know that's what I wrote, right?
Perhaps I am misunderstanding your explanation but it is important to clarify that the iBeacon only sends a very small data set of a few key/value pairs to the phone at which point, the phone needs to do the rest on its own. If you are suggesting that all of the work is done by the app alone without a connection to the internet, then the app will be huge and likely out of date since today's specials change everyday. The app should just be a lightweight shell which almost never needs to be updated and gets all the variable data from the Internet. It is the Internet server that holds your recent purchases, your personal info and the images of products the server's database thinks you might be interested in. In that way the iBeacon can change from hour to hour without requiring you to download an entire app update each time.

Right now the iBeacon device is typically a static transponder but it is also possible to make an iBeacon running on a computer that could change the promotion instantly depending on the time of day or catch of the day or whatever. That kind of robust interface would require the mobile device to have Internet access in order to work.

Yes, but... if the server is down you should have a fall-back -- so you don't just leave the user twisting in the wind!

FWIW, an iPhone or iPad (or even an AppleTV) would be an excellent candidate as an in-store server fall-back (ad hoc WiFi Server). By necessity, it wouldn't have the personalization profiles of all the users... nor, the the pictures and other high-bandwidth assets... but, it could have all the "store specials", "catch-of-the-day" in minimal, searchable tabular form.

And the way, I'd probably design it, I'd offer the customer a "rain check" for any offers that were unavailable due to server outage.
"...The calm is on the water and part of us would linger by the shore, For ships are safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for."
- Michael Lille -
Reply
"...The calm is on the water and part of us would linger by the shore, For ships are safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for."
- Michael Lille -
Reply
post #67 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

Nope. We are miles apart. The ID can be the same but the other key/value pairs can change dynamically which requires a computer or statically by reprogramming the dumb transponder. By getting data from the Internet I do not mean there is a link for a web browser. What I am referring to is the store's app displays the the data much like a web browser but it is running inside the app. That way you see the full advertisement layout without having to click on anything. All the fonts, colors, images, your personal greeting, all displayed in the app automatically using assets downloaded from the Internet. No clicking involved.

1) I don't think that can happen because interacting with an iBeacon only puts a local notice on your device. You still need to choose to respond to that iBeacon by opening up the app. If at that point it wants to show you a most recent advert that it downloads from the internet then of course it can since the app can do whatever it's programmed to do and it's now running on the device because you told it to. But do you really want that data to be pulled from the internet so cavalierly? I don't. I hope they'd they be savvy enough to include the basic stuff in the app and allow me to hit a button to get any up to date adverts, audio/video clips, whatever.

2) This has no bearing on how iBeacons work. They don't need anything to change in them. You deploy them and then the CVS app says "Hey, I recognize this as CVS iBeacon AA.BB.CC.DD.EE.FF which means I'm suppose to put a notice on your screen that says 'blah blah blah' and then poll the server for an updated advert if the app is opened within x-many minutes of this iBeacon being received."

3) Consider iBeacons the equivalent of a piece of string tied around your finger. In of itself it does nothing be remind someone that something needs to be done at some point. These are location-based strings around the fingers of apps. It's up to the app's programming to decide what they do that piece of string.
Edited by SolipsismX - 1/18/14 at 5:06pm

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

 

Goodbyeee jragosta :: http://forums.appleinsider.com/t/160864/jragosta-joseph-michael-ragosta

Reply

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

 

Goodbyeee jragosta :: http://forums.appleinsider.com/t/160864/jragosta-joseph-michael-ragosta

Reply
post #68 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

I previously wrote, "Now they could also give me a link to a current flyer with couponless and couponed deals which I may very well click if I am already looking at their iBeacon which then takes me to the app. At that point I would expect that to download to my phone in a few seconds. I would then probably give it a quick look for anything that sticks out."


I thought I was clear that the app could have local info as well as offer a way to get other info from the internet, like recent coupons and deals. This is not the app just being a shell. This is not requiring iBeacons to be portable web servers. This is not requiring a huge amount of data to be downloaded and it would only be done at the user's request. How much does data does a PDF flyer take need?


Again, there is no need for the iBeacon itself to change. It's unique ID will remain the same but how the app responds to that unique ID can change. By an app update or through polling a server. There is absolutely no reason to have the iBeacon to be running on a computer. All the processing is happening on your handheld device via the app or on a server that is talking to your app on your handheld device.
Nope. We are miles apart. The ID can be the same but the other key/value pairs can change dynamically which requires a computer or statically by reprogramming the dumb transponder. By getting data from the Internet I do not mean there is a link for a web browser. What I am referring to is the store's app displays the the data much like a web browser but it is running inside the app. That way you see the full advertisement layout without having to click on anything. All the fonts, colors, images, your personal greeting, all displayed in the app automatically using assets downloaded from the Internet. No clicking involved.

What you say would be "nice to have" but is it really a requirement?

It's been while, but I have some experience with Wal-Mart stores and supplying "featured products" on the Housewares aisle, Christmas aisle etc. These "specials" need to be planned in advance, inventory ordered and received, shelves stocked, etc.

Things like "catch of the day" and "Today's Specials" for restaurants, also need to be planned in advance (unless you're on Chopped) -- and you often see these scribbled on a blackboard or a note clipped to the menu...

You could easily write an iPhone app that included a blackboard of "Today's Specials" for the next several days and update the app as needed.

I don' know about you, but all our iDevices synch over WiFi and app updates are installed automatically -- so the apps are always up to date.


Can you describe a more specific use-case where lack of dynamic Internet access is a show stopper?

Likely, there are some -- but even the Apple Online Store goes down for hours on end!
"...The calm is on the water and part of us would linger by the shore, For ships are safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for."
- Michael Lille -
Reply
"...The calm is on the water and part of us would linger by the shore, For ships are safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for."
- Michael Lille -
Reply
post #69 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

1) I don't think that can happen because interacting with an iBeacon only puts a local notice on your device. You still need to choose to respond to that iBeacon by opening up the app. 

2) This has no bearing on how iBeacons work. They don't need anything to change in them. You deploy them and then the CVS app says "Hey, I recognize this as CVS iBeacon AA.BB.CC.DD.EE.FF which means I'm suppose to put a notice on your screen that says 'blah blah blah' and then poll the server for an updated advert if the app is opened within x-many minutes of this iBeacon being received."

Ok sort of... there are at least a couple common scenarios with a retail deployment. 

 

1) the app is running in the foreground

2) the app is  running in the background

3) the app is not running

 

In case #1 the app can put the ad on the screen without user consent. Otherwise it will send a notification which needs to be accepted by the user. If accepted the app should open and the ad should display in its entirety without further interaction. In all cases the ad data typically comes from the Internet unless the Internet is unavailable. In that case some default error message would display. 

 

Obviously there are different use cases such as you noted earlier where the data doesn't change. In that case all of the data could be in the app itself and would not need an Internet connection but from a commercial perspective I don't see that situation being very common.

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

Reply

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

Reply
post #70 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

I don' know about you, but all our iDevices synch over WiFi and app updates are installed automatically -- so the apps ar always up to date.
 

If the phone is on wifi and plugged in. 

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

Reply

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

Reply
post #71 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

Ok sort of... there are at least a couple common scenarios with a retail deployment. 

1) the app is running in the foreground
2) the app is  running in the background
3) the app is not running

In case #1 the app can put the ad on the screen without user consent. Otherwise it will send a notification which needs to be accepted by the user. If accepted the app should open and the ad should display in its entirety without further interaction. In all cases the ad data typically comes from the Internet unless the Internet is unavailable. In that case some default error message would display. 

Obviously there are different use cases such as you noted earlier where the data doesn't change. In that case all of the data could be in the app itself and would not need an Internet connection but from a commercial perspective I don't see that situation being very common.

None of this addresses your previous comments about the iBeacon itself needing updates and covers what I've already stated. Are you now clear that the iBeacon itself is a dumb transmitter?
Edited by SolipsismX - 1/18/14 at 5:16pm

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

 

Goodbyeee jragosta :: http://forums.appleinsider.com/t/160864/jragosta-joseph-michael-ragosta

Reply

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

 

Goodbyeee jragosta :: http://forums.appleinsider.com/t/160864/jragosta-joseph-michael-ragosta

Reply
post #72 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

I don' know about you, but all our iDevices synch over WiFi and app updates are installed automatically -- so the apps ar always up to date.

 
If the phone is on wifi and plugged in. 

Doesn't have to be plugged in!

I've been installing a Beta version of Mavericks and the new version of Final Cut -- and I have been doing several reboots a day...

Each time I reboot, iTunes starts and finds any iDevice it can see and starts synching over WiFi -- they're not all plugged in!
Edited by Dick Applebaum - 1/18/14 at 5:23pm
"...The calm is on the water and part of us would linger by the shore, For ships are safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for."
- Michael Lille -
Reply
"...The calm is on the water and part of us would linger by the shore, For ships are safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for."
- Michael Lille -
Reply
post #73 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post
 
None of this addresses your previous comments about the iBeacon itself needing updates. Are you now clear that the iBeacon itself is a dumb transmitter?

Not necessarily. Even an iPhone can be turned into an iBeacon.  It takes a little hacking to make a Mavericks running Mac into an iBeacon but that is also possible. If you want to make changes to the key/value pairs, that is completely up to you. If you want to move certain merchandise around the store without changing the promotions on the server or the location of the iBeacon you can change the key/value pairs instead.

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

Reply

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

Reply
post #74 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

Not necessarily. Even an iPhone can be turned into an iBeacon.  It takes a little hacking to make a Mavericks running Mac into an iBeacon but that is also possible. If you want to make changes to the key/value pairs, that is completely up to you. If you want to move certain merchandise around the store without changing the promotions on the server or the location of the iBeacon you can change the key/value pairs instead.

What does that have to do with anything being discussed? Yes, anything that sends a BT signal can be turned into an iBeacon because it's that simple of a design, but if the CVS app doesn't have that as one of the iBeacons on its list why does it matter? And, yet again, the iBeacon is just telling the app on the device that it's there. The app still needs to do what it's programmed to do. The iBeacon in no way tells the app how to dance.

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

 

Goodbyeee jragosta :: http://forums.appleinsider.com/t/160864/jragosta-joseph-michael-ragosta

Reply

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

 

Goodbyeee jragosta :: http://forums.appleinsider.com/t/160864/jragosta-joseph-michael-ragosta

Reply
post #75 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

Doesn't have to be plugged in!

I've been installing a Beta version of Mavericks and the new version of final cut -- annd I have been doing several reboots a day...

Each time I reboot, iTunes starts and finds any iDevice it can see and starts synching over WiFi -- they're not all plugged in!

I didn't know that. I thought the phone needed to be plugged in. Perhaps it depends on the size of the update. I know an OS update needs to be plugged in.

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

Reply

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

Reply
post #76 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post
 
Quote:
The iBeacon in no way tells the app how to dance.

It does. When you are near a certain item in the store, the iBeacon sends the key/value pairs associated with that item. If you move the item to a different location in the store and put some other merchandise where it used to be, you need to tell the iBeacon about it or move it, the former being a little more practical.

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

Reply

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

Reply
post #77 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

It does. When you are near a certain item in the store, the iBeacon sends the key/value pairs associated with that item. If you move the item to a different location in the store and put some other merchandise where it used to be, you need to tell the iBeacon about it or move it, the former being a little more practical.

Show me where the iBeacon knows what merchandise is around it? Show where the iBeacon has a complex set of instructions (an XML file?) of all the merchandise that is around it? Explain to me why you think this simple, BLE transmitter needs to have any information in it at all?
Edited by SolipsismX - 1/18/14 at 5:41pm

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

 

Goodbyeee jragosta :: http://forums.appleinsider.com/t/160864/jragosta-joseph-michael-ragosta

Reply

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

 

Goodbyeee jragosta :: http://forums.appleinsider.com/t/160864/jragosta-joseph-michael-ragosta

Reply
post #78 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

Show me where the iBeacon knows what merchandise is around it? Show where the iBeacon has a complex set of instructions (an XML file?) of all the merchandise that is around it? Explain to me why you think this simple, BLE transmitter needs to have any information in it all?

 iBeacons features micro-location geofencing so depending how close you are to the transmitter the mobile device knows where it is. This is how indoor mapping apps work and can also be used to display different ads depending on where you are within the store.

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

Reply

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

Reply
post #79 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

 iBeacons features micro-location geofencing so depending how close you are to the transmitter the mobile device knows where it is. This is how indoor mapping apps work and can also be used to display different ads depending on where you are within the store.

Your device knows how far away from the iBeacon it is, but the iBeacon doesn't know that your device exists or what products are placed next to it. It's up to whomever is in charge of the iBeacons to make sure they are near the appropriate items in a store for which the app has been programmed.

In no way does the iBeacon say "Oh shit, I'm being moved. I should tell all my other iBeacon buddies and my home server to update my location." If someone moves the iBeacon and doesn't make the appropriate changes to how the devices responses to its one-way communication then it becomes useless to both the proprietor and consumer.

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

 

Goodbyeee jragosta :: http://forums.appleinsider.com/t/160864/jragosta-joseph-michael-ragosta

Reply

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

 

Goodbyeee jragosta :: http://forums.appleinsider.com/t/160864/jragosta-joseph-michael-ragosta

Reply
post #80 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

 
Not necessarily. Even an iPhone can be turned into an iBeacon.  It takes a little hacking to make a Mavericks running Mac into an iBeacon but that is also possible. If you want to make changes to the key/value pairs, that is completely up to you. If you want to move certain merchandise around the store without changing the promotions on the server or the location of the iBeacon you can change the key/value pairs instead.

I don't understand what you mean by changing key/value pairs!

Below is the definition of the CLBeacon Class and it defines what data is received when a listened for iBeacon is detected:

As you can see, everything is (coded into or generated by) the iBeacon. The App must specify the proximityUUID (the iBeacon UUID) t listen for and optionally a major ID and minor ID.

Overview

The CLBeacon class represents a beacon that was encountered during region monitoring. You do not create instances of this class directly. The location manager object reports encountered beacons to its associated delegate object. You can use the information in a beacon object to identify which beacon was encountered.

The identity of a beacon is defined by its proximityUUID, major, and minor properties. These values are coded into the beacon itself. For a more thorough description of the meaning of those values, see CLBeaconRegion Class Reference.

Identifying the Beacon
   proximityUUID property
   major property
   minor property
Determining the Beacon Distance
   proximity property
   accuracy property
   rssi property


Properties

accuracy
The accuracy of the proximity value, measured in meters from the beacon. (read-only)

Indicates the one sigma horizontal accuracy in meters. Use this property to differentiate between beacons with the same proximity value. Do not use it to identify a precise location for the beacon. Accuracy values may fluctuate due to RF interference.

A negative value in this property signifies that the actual accuracy could not be determined.


major
The most significant value in the beacon. (read-only)


minor
The least significant value in the beacon. (read-only)


proximity
The relative distance to the beacon. (read-only)

The value in this property gives a general sense of the relative distance to the beacon. Use it to quickly identify beacons that are nearer to the user rather than farther away.


proximityUUID
The proximity ID of the beacon. (read-only)


rssi
The received signal strength of the beacon, measured in decibels. (read-only)

Discussion
This value is the average RSSI value of the samples received since the range of the beacon was last reported to your app.


Constants

CLProximity
Constants that reflect the relative distance to a beacon.

typedef {
   CLProximityUnknown,
   CLProximityImmediate,
   CLProximityNear,
   CLProximityFar
} CLProximity;

CLProximityUnknown
The proximity of the beacon could not be determined.

CLProximityImmediate
The beacon is in the user’s immediate vicinity.

CLProximityNear
The beacon is relatively close to the user.

CLProximityFar
The beacon is far away.


https://developer.apple.com/library/ios/documentation/CoreLocation/Reference/CLBeacon_class/Reference/Reference.html
"...The calm is on the water and part of us would linger by the shore, For ships are safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for."
- Michael Lille -
Reply
"...The calm is on the water and part of us would linger by the shore, For ships are safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for."
- Michael Lille -
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Discussion
AppleInsider › Forums › General › General Discussion › Coca-Cola mulls deployment of Apple's iBeacon at World Cup and beyond