or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPad › Review: SteelSeries Stratus portable wireless gaming controller for iPhone & iPad
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Review: SteelSeries Stratus portable wireless gaming controller for iPhone & iPad

post #1 of 37
Thread Starter 
The SteelSeries Stratus is the first Apple-sanctioned, completely wireless gaming controller for iPhone, iPad and iPod touch devices running iOS 7. It comes in a super-portable size that's great for travel while still managing to pack in a full complement of buttons, but its diminutive form factor sacrifices some levels of comfort, while its high $100 price tag may be hard to justify.

Strata


The Stratus marks the third official Made for 'iDevice' controller to hit the market, and the first with a wireless-only design. Previously, AppleInsider reviewed both the Moga Ace Power and the Logitech PowerShell, two accessories that only offer iPhone connectivity through the device's Lightning port.

For the purposes of this review, SteelSeries provided us with a pre-release version of the Stratus wireless gaming controller, which retails for $99.99, as well as an iPad mini with Retina display, preloaded with a handful of controller-compatible games.

Strata


Design and feel



There's not a lot of wasted space in the design of this controller from SteelSeries. Though it's remarkably small, the front face still includes a rather large D-pad, two separate joysticks, four face buttons (A, B, X, and Y), a pause button, and series of LEDs that indicate the player number.

Perhaps even more impressive, the Stratus also includes four shoulder buttons atop the tiny device, named L1, R1, L2 and R2. The inclusion of two sticks and eight buttons is important for guaranteeing future compatibility with more complex titles akin to those available for PlayStation or Xbox.

Strata


This stands in contrast to the Logitech controller we reviewed, which features a D-pad with no joysticks, and only two shoulder buttons. We found that the Logitech would have limited appeal for use with traditional 3D games because of these omissions, but thankfully we can't say the same for the Stratus.

Beyond its buttons, the Stratus also features a Micro USB port on the bottom of the controller, while its right side has a switch that enables or disables Bluetooth. The back has a button that can be pressed to re-sync with a new device, and we found pairing it with our own iPhone 5s and iPad Air, as well as the provided Retina iPad mini, was as simple as you'd expect.

Strata


The Stratus is remarkably light --?so much so that when we first picked it up, we checked to see if we needed to insert a battery somewhere. But the affixed battery is installed in the controller, with a dedicated micro USB port on the bottom for recharging.

The small size of the controller does cause some expected drawbacks with regards to comfort. Understandably, the controller feels a little cramped, particularly with the layout of the shoulder buttons.

The L1 and R1 buttons up top are thin and elongated, placed closest to the face of the controller and distinguished with raised bumps that allow a user to easily feel them on their fingertips. We found these buttons were easier to locate and press than the thicker R2 and L2 buttons below, which are centered and do not run the entire length of the top of the controller.

Strata


That SteelSeries managed to successfully fit all four shoulder buttons onto the controller is an impressive achievement. And after some practice, we found that the buttons were indeed usable. But gamers with larger hands may want to try before they buy, because handling a controller this small could be a chore for some.

SteelSeries commendably attempted to address these size issues with the inclusion of a clear plastic backing accessory, which adds a little more depth to the controller if users wish to attach the piece. We found that the controller was indeed more comfortable in our hands with this piece attached, though it was prone to falling off somewhat easily.

When placing the plastic back extension on the controller, the wireless sync button is covered up. The plastic back includes two grooves on each side, which act as natural places for your fingers to grip the device.

Strata


The controller's protruding joysticks are also appreciated, but seem like an odd choice for a controller that is clearly focused on portability. In contrast, the only other dual-stick Made for iPhone controller on the market, the Moga Ace Power, features sliding circle pads that lay flat on the accessory, aiding in portability and reducing the risk of breakage.

Given the small form factor of the Stratus, we can't help but feel that sliding circle pads may have been a better joystick option. While they are indeed inferior to full-fledged joysticks, the SteelSeries controller is intended for maximum portability. That said, the protruding sticks do feel durable and we were given no indication that they might have issues from regular daily use.

Strata


And while we were somewhat concerned about the wobbly construction of the Moga when it was not plugged in, we have no such issues with the build of the SteelSeries model. This feels like a solidly built product that should last if treated properly.

It's also infinitely more pocketable than both the Moga and Logitech offerings. Even when the collapsible Moga is shrunk down to its smallest size, the Stratus is little more than half its size, and can be carried in a pocket with relative ease.

Strata


Usage and games



As we acknowledged in our previous controller reviews, the current Made for iPhone accessory gaming experience is a mixed bag. Unfortunately, much of that blame falls on game developers and Apple itself.

Assessing the SteelSeries Stratus on its own as a gaming accessory, we're pleased. The controller does a commendable job of fitting all of the expected buttons for a modern controller into its small size. It's really quite an achievement, all things considered.

There was a little bit of a learning curve with the top L and R buttons for games that use them. Specifically, we found that sometimes we weren't properly pressing the R2 button hard enough when attempting to accelerate a car in Grand Theft Auto: San Andreas.

Strata


After a few minutes of use, however, we found that we became acclimated to the controller's small and unique size. For the average mobile gaming session, this accessory is likely enough for most users, though hands may begin to cramp up with such a small controller during extended play sessions.

While we question the use of protruding joysticks on portable-focused controller, we can't fault the feel of these. They're slightly on the stiff side, but we didn't have any problems steering a joyride in GTA or popping off headshots on zombies in Dead Trigger 2.

To showcase the Stratus, SteelSeries included the aforementioned titles, as well as:

This selection of titles provided by SteelSeries only served to remind us how woefully inadequate the App Store currently is in that regard. In our view, Apple needs to have a section of the App Store devoted specifically to games that feature controller compatibility.

Further complicating matters is the fact that there is no default, standard identifier on specific games as to whether or not controller support is offered. Even more frustrating is the fact that Apple already has a "Supports" subheading on App Store listings, where it identifies titles that include Game Center integration. Simply adding an icon and identifier to this section of apps would be a big help for finding compatible titles.

Strata


Apple is not the only party to blame as developers have their share of problems in current titles. For example, while input in Bastion is greatly improved with a controller, there are still elements of the game that needlessly continue to rely on touchscreen input, such as navigating in and out of some of the game's menus and storefronts.

Ultimately, developers may choose to require both physical and touchscreen input on their titles -- that combination has also been done to varying degrees of success in titles for the Nintendo DS and 3DS, as well as Sony's PlayStation Vita. But for now, controller support on iOS feels half baked in some games.

Finally, there's the wireless nature of the controller. Because it's an entirely separate accessory, using the Stratus with an iPhone on the go may be tricky for some users, as there's no place to hold Apple's handset.

This is in contrast to the Moga and Logitech offerings, which actually hold the iPhone. The SteelSeries controller may not be a great option for gamers who want to get a quick fix in on the subway, for example.

We can't knock the Stratus for this, though, because a wireless controller also offers numerous advantages and flexibility for gamers. Ultimately customers must decide which form factor is ideal for their gaming sessions.

Conclusion



As only the third Made for iOS device gaming controller to hit the market, the SteelSeries Stratus doesn't have a very high bar to exceed. While we saw merits in both earlier options, we felt like the Moga Ace Power was a better choice for gamers, though we still came away disappointed with the hefty $100 price tag.

For now, it's an easy choice: Gamers looking for a fixed, attached controller for their iPhone, and who like the benefit of an added battery to recharge their handset, can choose Moga's offering. But if you're looking to game on your iPad, or you want a more portable controller, the SteelSeries Stratus is the way to go.

Unfortunately, like the Logitech and Moga before it, the Stratus is also set to retail for $99.99. And unless you're a very serious iOS gamer, it's hard to recommend any controller accessory at that price.

Strata


In comparison, wireless controllers for Microsoft's newly released Xbox One and Sony's new PlayStation 4 cost $60. And at that price, they even offer greater functionality, such as microphone inputs, rumble feedback, and a dedicated touchpad on Sony's DualShock 4.

SteelSeries even sells a Bluetooth controller for PCs and Android tablets with a similar design and form factor, and that device sells for just $60 -- $40 less than the Made for iPhone equivalent. This product would be difficult to recommend to the average user at $60, let alone $100.

That said, SteelSeries has done a good job of differentiating its controller, making it not only the first wireless option made for iOS devices, but also giving it a compact design that's easily pocketable and ideal for mobile games. It's an impressive, tiny and portable design that we believe will appeal to a certain subset of gamers who may not mind the price tag.

Score: 2.5 out of 5



ratings_hl_25.png

Pros


  • Compact design makes it a great portable controller
  • Completely wireless, letting it play nicely with iPhone, iPad and iPod touch
  • Manages to fit in a full array of buttons that gamers expect


Cons


  • Cramped design may be uncomfortable for some
  • L2 and R2 buttons are awkwardly placed because of size constraints
  • $100 is still too much for a gaming controller


Where to buy



For U.S. customers, the Stratus is advertised to begin shipping within 30 days direct from the company. It is not yet available for preorder from other retailers.
post #2 of 37
Sucks. This looked promising. Apple needs to make compatibility universal otherwise it's fragmentation hell! Most casual gamers would not want to double or triple check if their controller works for a particular game.
post #3 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gordio View Post

Sucks. This looked promising. Apple needs to make compatibility universal otherwise it's fragmentation hell! Most casual gamers would not want to double or triple check if their controller works for a particular game.

I thought that's what Apple did with iOS 7. What's missing from the Game Controller framework for this to truly be universal?

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

 

Goodbyeee jragosta :: http://forums.appleinsider.com/t/160864/jragosta-joseph-michael-ragosta

Reply

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

 

Goodbyeee jragosta :: http://forums.appleinsider.com/t/160864/jragosta-joseph-michael-ragosta

Reply
post #4 of 37
This review seems a bit harsh. 2.5 out of 5? The thing works as advertised. Had no connection problems was responsive, what gives?

Complaining about cramped controls for a device designed to be pocketable is only stating the obvious. Do you expect a pocketable device to be the same size as a bigger controller? Somebody had been watching too much Dr. who.

As for price and lack of game compatibility. This is a first generation product that is not even available yet. Does anything ever have complete compatibility at first release? No. The xbox controller comparison is completely unfair. That is a high volume OEM device. Msoft makes money on the game licensing not the hardware. I expect to pay $100 for a quality aftermarket first gen device.

And calling the joysticks protruding. They look like they are smartly recessed. I dont think i've seen this before, but it looks like a great idea.


I think a more objective review would have called this a good pocketable controller that works well and packed in more buttons than its full sized competitor. Even 3.5 seems low to me based on price and that it isnt for everyone, but 2.5? That makes me question your objectivity.
post #5 of 37
Originally Posted by whaaaaaahu View Post
The thing works as advertised.

 

It’s microscopic. Is it advertised as being unusably small?

 
Complaining about cramped controls for a device designed to be pocketable is only stating the obvious.

 

Funny how controls on the iPhone’s screen itself aren’t cramped, and yet the device is pocketable.

 
Do you expect a pocketable device to be the same size as a bigger controller?

 

I expect a pocketable device to be of the same usability as another pocketable device.

 
This is a first generation product that is not even available yet.

 

Which explains how you know that it “works as advertised”.

 
I expect to pay $100 for a quality aftermarket first gen device.

 

And this is neither quality nor first-gen (I assume you mean first party). So where does that leave this pathetic waste of $100?

 
…smartly recessed.

 

:lol:

 
I dont think i've seen this before

 

Except on the Nintendo 3DS (whirlwind success) and PSP Go (catastrophic failure) years ago.

 
I think a more objective review would have called this a good pocketable controller that works well and packed in more buttons than its full sized competitor. 

 

I think that a shill for the company would do well not to be every single thing that you’ve been.

 

It’s not good, it doesn’t work well, and “packing in more buttons” tells me that it’s even more cramped than it would otherwise have been. You want an objective review? Get your team to send ME one or shut up and deal the above.

Originally Posted by asdasd

This is Appleinsider. It's all there for you but we can't do it for you.
Reply

Originally Posted by asdasd

This is Appleinsider. It's all there for you but we can't do it for you.
Reply
post #6 of 37
Mike, did the review say it didnt work? No. They used it with several games and had no problems with it.
post #7 of 37
Either that guy has huge hands or this controller is tiny. I would've forgone pocketability for usability, and built it bigger.
"I got the answer by talking in my brain and I agreed of the answer my brain got" a 7 yr old explaining his math HW
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
Reply
"I got the answer by talking in my brain and I agreed of the answer my brain got" a 7 yr old explaining his math HW
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
Reply
post #8 of 37

I would have liked to see a video of it in action.

oneof52
Reply
oneof52
Reply
post #9 of 37
Tallest, i think the fact that this is my 3rd post and i dont even know how to quote you makes it very unlikely that i am a paid poster (which i am not. And i dont work for Steelseries

You say its not good, doesn't work well and is a pathetic waste when you have never used one and the review doesn't say any of that. You are making stuff up. .

Full disclosure. I have bought two steelseries products and i have found both of them to be excellent products, so yes i like the brand, but no i'm not a fanboy. My opinion is coming from the review itself.
post #10 of 37
How in the world do these companies have the stones to sell these cheap plastic controllers at $100 a pop. They must be smoking something fierce. I literally will never touch a gamepad for my iPad until it's a $10 bargain on Amazon .

What blows my mind is that this is steel series, who have a good track record of PC gaming peripherals at decent prices.
post #11 of 37
Originally Posted by whaaaaaahu View Post
I have bought two steel series products…

 

Have you bought this SteelSeries product?

Originally Posted by asdasd

This is Appleinsider. It's all there for you but we can't do it for you.
Reply

Originally Posted by asdasd

This is Appleinsider. It's all there for you but we can't do it for you.
Reply
post #12 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by koop View Post

How in the world do these companies have the stones to sell these cheap plastic controllers at $100 a pop. They must be smoking something fierce. I literally will never touch a gamepad for my iPad until it's a $10 bargain on Amazon .

What blows my mind is that this is steel series, who have a good track record of PC gaming peripherals at decent prices.

I think the per unit licensing of the Lightning port is at least $10. You do expect these companies to make a profit, right?

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

 

Goodbyeee jragosta :: http://forums.appleinsider.com/t/160864/jragosta-joseph-michael-ragosta

Reply

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

 

Goodbyeee jragosta :: http://forums.appleinsider.com/t/160864/jragosta-joseph-michael-ragosta

Reply
post #13 of 37

Since this device supports iOS, shouldn't also work on Mac OS X Mavericks game apps?

I had thought they had similar API's / Frameworks...

 

Better yet, why not just enable the several bluetooth gamepad's I have already (namely PS3 and Xbox) to work on the same framework?

 

The plus side would be that it gives a larger installed based base giving game developers a better reason to support these controllers.

post #14 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Patrick Byars View Post

Since this device supports iOS, shouldn't also work on Mac OS X Mavericks game apps?
I had thought they had similar API's / Frameworks...

Better yet, why not just enable the several bluetooth gamepad's I have already (namely PS3 and Xbox) to work on the same framework?

The plus side would be that it gives a larger installed based base giving game developers a better reason to support these controllers.

1) Yes, there are a lot of frameworks and APIs that work across iOS and Mac OS X, but I don't think the game controller framework is one of them.

2) This is still new as of iOS 7 so hopefully we'll see some good controllers on the market also include support iOS-based games. It seems to me it's not impossible to do.

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

 

Goodbyeee jragosta :: http://forums.appleinsider.com/t/160864/jragosta-joseph-michael-ragosta

Reply

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

 

Goodbyeee jragosta :: http://forums.appleinsider.com/t/160864/jragosta-joseph-michael-ragosta

Reply
post #15 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by MichaelJCocks View Post

Whaaaaaahu, you didn't deny the accusation that you are employed by steelseries. You are a joke. You have no clout on this site. I, on the other hand , am a successful actor. Have you seen "The Secret to My Success?"
Yours,
Mike


Wow I didn't know Super Girl posted on this site!

My wife bought an Android phone so now I'm single...
Reply
My wife bought an Android phone so now I'm single...
Reply
post #16 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post
 

It’s not good, it doesn’t work well, and “packing in more buttons” tells me that it’s even more cramped than it would otherwise have been. You want an objective review? Get your team to send ME one or shut up and deal the above.

 

Forgive me for noticing this, but aren't you libelling the company/product here? I mean you admit you've never used it, but yet you claim facts that you have no way of knowing.

 

 

For what it's worth. I find any touchscreen controls to be too cramped, but I have more than an octave range so small screens like the iPhone are already slightly problematic.

post #17 of 37

All iOS controllers being overprice is not a coincidence.  You can blame Apple for that, which requires specific suppliers, specific hardware specs  and overcharge on licenses fees.

 

Apple should have stick to software standards only. If Apple want's to regulate hardware they should make there own overprice controller... Apple has no experience in that field and all its doing right now it killing innovation for the people that actually know how to make those devices.


Edited by herbapou - 1/20/14 at 8:10am
post #18 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by herbapou View Post

All iOS controllers being overprice is not a coincidence.  You can blame Apple for that, which requires specific suppliers, specific hardware specs  and overcharge on licenses fees.

Apple should have stick to software standards only. If Apple want's to regulate hardware they should make there own overprice controller... Apple has no experience in that field and all its doing right now it killing innovation for the people that actually know how to make those devices.

It's not achieving the effect they want either, which is that they all work the same way and with all games that implement support. They stipulate that all buttons are analog, even buttons that normally aren't on other controllers. As Microsoft has shown with the 360 controller, it only works if one company does the hardware because developers are working to the exact same setup and games have a certification label for that one controller and corresponding layout. Developers simply aren't going to spend $400 on controllers to make sure they all work properly in various setups.

Mobile users have shown that gaming is the most profitable category by a long way:

http://www.newzoo.com/insights/distimo-2012-report-games-account-for-66-of-total-revenues-from-apps/

but Apple seems reluctant to put too much interest in it. Microsoft has an internal games studio that owns franchises:

http://www.microsoft-careers.com/go/Microsoft-Games-Studios-Jobs/44366/
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Microsoft_Studios

They build wired and wireless controllers that work across Windows, XBox and their Surface tablets:



They certify games that support the controller. Their A7 chip is really advanced, even the very latest Tegra K1 that was showing off the advanced graphics demos is only marginally faster:

http://www.extremetech.com/computing/174592-tegra-k1-benchmarks-show-better-cpu-and-gpu-performance-than-snapdragon-800-and-apple-a7

Visually, it should perform on par. This is fast enough to run every PS3 and 360 game and what do we get? Tomb Raider 1. Apple is the only company that does the end-to-end business model completely and they don't take control of the most profitable software category. There's a lot of revenue in the games business:

http://www.gartner.com/newsroom/id/2614915

Mobile only takes a small part so far. With a bit of effort, modern AAA games, compelling hardware, they could push another $10b in app sales, increasing their part another $3b for the year in software alone and having the games helps persuade parents to buy hardware for their kids.
post #19 of 37
Originally Posted by ItsTheInternet View Post

Forgive me for noticing this, but aren't you libelling the company/product here? I mean you admit you've never used it, but yet you claim facts that you have no way of knowing.

 

Did you read the article?

 
For what it's worth. I find any touchscreen controls to be too cramped

 

Well, that’s impossible.

Originally Posted by asdasd

This is Appleinsider. It's all there for you but we can't do it for you.
Reply

Originally Posted by asdasd

This is Appleinsider. It's all there for you but we can't do it for you.
Reply
post #20 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by ItsTheInternet View Post

Forgive me for noticing this, but aren't you libelling the company/product here? I mean you admit you've never used it, but yet you claim facts that you have no way of knowing.


For what it's worth. I find any touchscreen controls to be too cramped, but I have more than an octave range so small screens like the iPhone are already slightly problematic.

Forgive him, he seems to be in a particularly bad mood today.
post #21 of 37
Originally Posted by daveinpublic View Post
Forgive him, he seems to be in a particularly bad mood today.

 

How about you not speak for other people? Tell me how either of his statements make any sense.

Originally Posted by asdasd

This is Appleinsider. It's all there for you but we can't do it for you.
Reply

Originally Posted by asdasd

This is Appleinsider. It's all there for you but we can't do it for you.
Reply
post #22 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post
 

 

Did you read the article?

 

Well, that’s impossible.


I did read the article, but I don't feel that repeating the subjective opinions of another is an excuse. Also for what it's worth I don't mean any possible touchscreen, I mean all touchscreen phones. I don't want my fingers in the way of the action. Small controllers like this are pretty cool I feel, although the lack of a retaining mechanism is a big downside.

post #23 of 37
Originally Posted by ItsTheInternet View Post
I did read the article, but I don't feel that repeating the subjective opinions of another is an excuse.

 

Still waiting for that guy to confirm that he owns a product not yet released, too.

 
Also for what it's worth I don't mean any possible touchscreen, I mean all touchscreen phones.

 

You should have said that, then.

Originally Posted by asdasd

This is Appleinsider. It's all there for you but we can't do it for you.
Reply

Originally Posted by asdasd

This is Appleinsider. It's all there for you but we can't do it for you.
Reply
post #24 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marvin View Post


It's not achieving the effect they want either, which is that they all work the same way and with all games that implement support. They stipulate that all buttons are analog, even buttons that normally aren't on other controllers. As Microsoft has shown with the 360 controller, it only works if one company does the hardware because developers are working to the exact same setup and games have a certification label for that one controller and corresponding layout. Developers simply aren't going to spend $400 on controllers to make sure they all work properly in various setups.

Mobile users have shown that gaming is the most profitable category by a long way:

http://www.newzoo.com/insights/distimo-2012-report-games-account-for-66-of-total-revenues-from-apps/

but Apple seems reluctant to put too much interest in it. Microsoft has an internal games studio that owns franchises:

http://www.microsoft-careers.com/go/Microsoft-Games-Studios-Jobs/44366/
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Microsoft_Studios

They build wired and wireless controllers that work across Windows, XBox and their Surface tablets:



They certify games that support the controller. Their A7 chip is really advanced, even the very latest Tegra K1 that was showing off the advanced graphics demos is only marginally faster:

http://www.extremetech.com/computing/174592-tegra-k1-benchmarks-show-better-cpu-and-gpu-performance-than-snapdragon-800-and-apple-a7

Visually, it should perform on par. This is fast enough to run every PS3 and 360 game and what do we get? Tomb Raider 1. Apple is the only company that does the end-to-end business model completely and they don't take control of the most profitable software category. There's a lot of revenue in the games business:

http://www.gartner.com/newsroom/id/2614915

Mobile only takes a small part so far. With a bit of effort, modern AAA games, compelling hardware, they could push another $10b in app sales, increasing their part another $3b for the year in software alone and having the games helps persuade parents to buy hardware for their kids.

 

I am still hoping the game controls real goal are to pave the way to a more powerfull Apple TV with gaming apps. But I been waiting for this for so long my expectations are not very high. An Apple TV with a A7 could be a decent game console.

post #25 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

How about you not speak for other people? Tell me how either of his statements make any sense.

In my defense, I said seems. And getting too upset in the comment section can be bad for your blood pressure. You should seriously think about either using a stress ball or popping bubble wrap while you read the comments.
post #26 of 37
A/B/X/Y buttons again? I'm tired of all this dullness / lack of inventive. Pass.
post #27 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by LilSmirk View Post

A/B/X/Y buttons again? I'm tired of all this dullness / lack of inventive. Pass.

That’s Apple's setup not their's. This link was posted earlier but you obviously missed it.

https://developer.apple.com/library/ios/documentation/ServicesDiscovery/Conceptual/GameControllerPG/Introduction/Introduction.html#//apple_ref/doc/uid/TP40013276-CH1-SW1
"I got the answer by talking in my brain and I agreed of the answer my brain got" a 7 yr old explaining his math HW
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
Reply
"I got the answer by talking in my brain and I agreed of the answer my brain got" a 7 yr old explaining his math HW
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
Reply
post #28 of 37
Originally Posted by daveinpublic View Post
In my defense, I said seems. And getting too upset in the comment section can be bad for your blood pressure. You should seriously think about either using a stress ball or popping bubble wrap while you read the comments.

 

Nah. How about people not post lies instead?

 

Originally Posted by LilSmirk View Post
A/B/X/Y buttons again? I'm tired of all this dullness / lack of inventive. Pass.
 

Are you crazy? ABXY has been the standard for decades. How is it “dull”? How is anything else “inventive”?

Originally Posted by asdasd

This is Appleinsider. It's all there for you but we can't do it for you.
Reply

Originally Posted by asdasd

This is Appleinsider. It's all there for you but we can't do it for you.
Reply
post #29 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Nah. How about people not post lies instead?

If you figure out a way to get people to stop posting lies on the Internet I'll be glad. But, until then there's always bubble wrap. 1smile.gif
post #30 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post
 

 

Nah. How about people not post lies instead?

I didn't lie for what it's worth, yet you claimed to know facts about an unreleased controller based only on a third party review and libelled the company as a result.

 

Please don't throw stones in the Apple Store.

post #31 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post

That’s Apple's setup not their's. This link was posted earlier but you obviously missed it.

https://developer.apple.com/library/ios/documentation/ServicesDiscovery/Conceptual/GameControllerPG/Introduction/Introduction.html#//apple_ref/doc/uid/TP40013276-CH1-SW1
Yeah, I'd totally missed it, thanks for the heads up.
Still, I know it sounds crazy, but I was expecting something better than just A/B/X/Y from Apple. Setting up a new button naming configuration would have given more personality to Apple's gaming platform ;-)
post #32 of 37
Originally Posted by ItsTheInternet View Post
yet you claimed to know facts about an unreleased controller based only on a third party review

 

Guess you don’t get this, or the concept of libel.

Originally Posted by asdasd

This is Appleinsider. It's all there for you but we can't do it for you.
Reply

Originally Posted by asdasd

This is Appleinsider. It's all there for you but we can't do it for you.
Reply
post #33 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post
 

Guess you don’t get this, or the concept of libel.

 

You made derogatory statements about a product without the ability to fall back on any defences. I may not be a solicitor / lawyer but I know a statement when I see it. Regardless this is not the place for this discussion and so I won't contest it anymore.

 

 

I can see the benefit of this sort of product but I think I'll wait and see what the market produces.

post #34 of 37
Originally Posted by ItsTheInternet View Post

You made derogatory statements about a product without the ability to fall back on any defences.

 

Read the article.

 
Regardless this is not the place for this discussion and so I won't contest it anymore.

 

Well, it’s the only place for it, but since your statement is ludicrous, I’m glad you’re giving it up.

Originally Posted by asdasd

This is Appleinsider. It's all there for you but we can't do it for you.
Reply

Originally Posted by asdasd

This is Appleinsider. It's all there for you but we can't do it for you.
Reply
post #35 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by LilSmirk View Post

Yeah, I'd totally missed it, thanks for the heads up.
Still, I know it sounds crazy, but I was expecting something better than just A/B/X/Y from Apple. Setting up a new button naming configuration would have given more personality to Apple's gaming platform ;-)

Some things just aren't worth changing, it's what we've known for a long time like the keyboard. Apple uses the same layout as everyone else.
"I got the answer by talking in my brain and I agreed of the answer my brain got" a 7 yr old explaining his math HW
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
Reply
"I got the answer by talking in my brain and I agreed of the answer my brain got" a 7 yr old explaining his math HW
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
Reply
post #36 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marvin View Post

It's not achieving the effect they want either, which is that they all work the same way and with all games that implement support. They stipulate that all buttons are analog, even buttons that normally aren't on other controllers. As Microsoft has shown with the 360 controller, it only works if one company does the hardware because developers are working to the exact same setup and games have a certification label for that one controller and corresponding layout. Developers simply aren't going to spend $400 on controllers to make sure they all work properly in various setups.

Mobile users have shown that gaming is the most profitable category by a long way:

http://www.newzoo.com/insights/distimo-2012-report-games-account-for-66-of-total-revenues-from-apps/

but Apple seems reluctant to put too much interest in it. Microsoft has an internal games studio that owns franchises:

http://www.microsoft-careers.com/go/Microsoft-Games-Studios-Jobs/44366/
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Microsoft_Studios

They build wired and wireless controllers that work across Windows, XBox and their Surface tablets:



They certify games that support the controller. Their A7 chip is really advanced, even the very latest Tegra K1 that was showing off the advanced graphics demos is only marginally faster:

http://www.extremetech.com/computing/174592-tegra-k1-benchmarks-show-better-cpu-and-gpu-performance-than-snapdragon-800-and-apple-a7

Visually, it should perform on par. This is fast enough to run every PS3 and 360 game and what do we get? Tomb Raider 1. Apple is the only company that does the end-to-end business model completely and they don't take control of the most profitable software category. There's a lot of revenue in the games business:

http://www.gartner.com/newsroom/id/2614915

Mobile only takes a small part so far. With a bit of effort, modern AAA games, compelling hardware, they could push another $10b in app sales, increasing their part another $3b for the year in software alone and having the games helps persuade parents to buy hardware for their kids.

I think there are some unknowns that make everyone a bit reluctant to give it a serious try - even MS who does have inhouse and exclusive-contracted developers. Or, realistically, Sony - all of PSP and (probably) most Vita games could run on modern smart device.

How many owners will buy full-price game (considering that smartphones and tablets are not primarily purchased for gaming)?

How will distribution work? Most purchased smart devices, I believe, are still 16Gb. Some can have additional flash storage. Gran Turismo 6 is about 16GB. GTA5 should be about the same. Final Fantasy 13 was around full single-layer BD, around 25GB I think. Many new games come on more than one DVD.

Controls. Consoles come with 100% standardised controls for the generation. PC, well, mouse/kbd are reasonably standard (and all games are easy to configure controls). Apple has standardised controller interface, if I understood correctly - but controllers do not come with smart devices by default, and 3rd party vary in number of buttons, analogue sticks etc.

I had a funny little discussion with a friend who recently started playing Real Racing on iPad Air, and is very hooked up. He is a real petrol-head in real life, and wealthy enough to be able to drive BMW 5 and BMW K 1300 GT bike... and is now talking about Porsche Macan (hate him! 1smile.gif. Knowing his driving history, I have encouraged him to check on latest Forza and Gran Turismo games - he hasn't been gaming for a while, I'm pretty sure he would be pleased. His response was why? when iPad Air hardware should be more than competitive with likes of PS3 and X360.

So we went into little discussion about game development. Polyphony Digital took sweet 6 years to develop GT5, and had budget of US$60,000,000. GT6 took not much less time than that. In that time, they were fully pampered by Sony; much as I have read, there was not even a presure on them to hurry up with development and release dates.

But. GT is the biggest selling game series in the world. Sony knows that they will sell couple of millions for full price, and another couple of millions when game goes Platinum. So they can pamper developer, pay for telemetry from Yokohama and other real world car-related marques to develop advanced in-game physics model, or even pay for laser scanning of race tracks for correct geometry and small details like bumps and curbs.
post #37 of 37

If it was $30, had the build quality of a first-party console controller and was backed up was implemented in a wider variety of games in a standardised way I'd buy one.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: iPad
  • Review: SteelSeries Stratus portable wireless gaming controller for iPhone & iPad
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPad › Review: SteelSeries Stratus portable wireless gaming controller for iPhone & iPad