or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPad › Apple releases two 'Your Verse' iPad Air ads
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Apple releases two 'Your Verse' iPad Air ads

post #1 of 31
Thread Starter 
As part of its ongoing "Your Verse" ad campaign, Apple on Wednesday released two short 30-second spots once again focusing on the iPad Air's eclectic capabilities as a tool for professionals and everyday users.

Your Verse


As with the full "Your Verse" ad which debuted almost two weeks ago, the latest commercials make use of Robin Williams' monologue from the movie "Dead Poets Society."

The ads, titled "Light Verse" and "Sound Verse" are basically remixes of the same scenes from the original spot, which show the iPad Air being used by mountain climbers, deep sea divers, children, and more.



Each spot contains the same snippet from Williams' dialogue: "To quote from Whitman, 'You are here -- that life exists, and identity; that the powerful play goes on and you may contribute a verse.' What will your verse be?"



While not as impactful as the full version with swelling music and sound effects, the 30-second tastes include a bit of unseen footage from each story.
post #2 of 31

These ads are terrible 

post #3 of 31
it's a really great ad, and these short versions just drive that home even more.

basically, they inspire folks to do something special - different - with their tablets besides merely basic web/media consumption. could be any brand of tablet, but of course the clever intent is to brand the iPad with this uplifting message. and i bet it works.

i can't imagine an uplifting message from Samsung. Google could try, but you know i think Google's real message-vibe out there these days is "creepy."
post #4 of 31
I enjoy these ads. Very inspirational.
post #5 of 31

Yeah I like these ads, they fit more with Apple than other ones I've seen. I feel inspired, but since I'm a procrastinator I'll do something about it tomorrow.

My blender/recipe blog: http://blenderinsider.com
Reply
My blender/recipe blog: http://blenderinsider.com
Reply
post #6 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2385amh View Post
 

These ads are terrible 

I have to agree. The primary reason is the voice of Robin Williams which I cannot abide. His voice manages to obfuscate the meaning of the words. I also feel that the last line should have been printed and not spoken, but that's just me. Generally though, the words themselves as inspirational as they may be, don't work well with such busy imagery. 

post #7 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2385amh View Post

These ads are terrible 

Ah, the clueless show up in the most unusual places......
post #8 of 31
I like these ads. Inspiring and actual promotes real use of the iPads.
post #9 of 31

The shortness is what was needed - the first one seemed a bit pretentious, but simply by shortening it they have fixed that I think.

 

Highbrow stuff works best in short doses.

post #10 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by paxman View Post
 

I have to agree. The primary reason is the voice of Robin Williams which I cannot abide. His voice manages to obfuscate the meaning of the words. I also feel that the last line should have been printed and not spoken, but that's just me. Generally though, the words themselves as inspirational as they may be, don't work well with such busy imagery. 

 

I wouldn't say the ads are terrible. Not great, maybe.

 

... but I do agree about Robin Williams, he doesn't have the heft to pull it off... plus, using the same words for both short spots... uh uh... that doesn't work for me at all.

na na na na na...
Reply
na na na na na...
Reply
post #11 of 31
I like the original long version of the ad. It was well done.

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
Reply

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
Reply
post #12 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by island hermit View Post
 

 

I wouldn't say the ads are terrible. Not great, maybe.

 

... but I do agree about Robin Williams, he doesn't have the heft to pull it off... plus, using the same words for both short spots... uh uh... that doesn't work for me at all.

Really? Robin Williams scored an Oscar for his role in Dead Poet's Society of which this comes from... give or take a re-recording.

post #13 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Darryn Lowe View Post
 

Really? Robin Williams scored an Oscar for his role in Dead Poet's Society of which this comes from... give or take a re-recording.

 

That should tell you something about the Oscars.

na na na na na...
Reply
na na na na na...
Reply
post #14 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by island hermit View Post
 

 

That should tell you something about the Oscars.

Should tell you something about people who rail on Robin Williams' skills. ;-)

post #15 of 31

If there were any truth in advertising, these ads would show people blogging from the toilet on their iPads. Might not be inspirational, but I gotta say it's been one of my favorite uses for a tablet. :-)

post #16 of 31

I like the ads. They are positive and tasteful. But what really makes them stand out is looking at the ads from the other guys - especially Microsoft's Surface and Samsung's. No reality there, just cheap actors pretending to be "typical" business people or families.

"You can't fall off the floor"   From 128k Mac to 8GB MBP

Reply

"You can't fall off the floor"   From 128k Mac to 8GB MBP

Reply
post #17 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cash907 View Post

If there were any truth in advertising, these ads would show people blogging from the toilet on their iPads. Might not be inspirational, but I gotta say it's been one of my favorite uses for a tablet. :-)
I guess you don't have a good enough imagination. 1tongue.gif
post #18 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Darryn Lowe View Post
 

Should tell you something about people who rail on Robin Williams' skills. ;-)

 

Well, in my opinion, his voiceover is weak. Oscar or no Oscar. All I can hear is Mork.

 

[... and, you are ill-informed. He never won an Oscar for his role in Dead Poet's Society]


Edited by island hermit - 1/23/14 at 6:44am
na na na na na...
Reply
na na na na na...
Reply
post #19 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post

I like the original long version of the ad. It was well done.


same, imo the 1 min version is better...

post #20 of 31
Self-conscious, pretentious. Atrocious narration. These ads (as did the previous one) make me wince. 1hmm.gif
post #21 of 31
I don't like the shorter ones. It crops the audio at the wrong point because it removes the question "What good amid these, O me, O life?". Without the question, the answer they include "you are here, that life exists and identity; that you may contribute a verse" is just hanging there on its own. If they'd cropped it into a statement "you are here, life exists and identity; you may contribute a verse, what will your verse be" then it might work better but would likely need another recording session.

When they abbreviate these things, I think it cheapens it because it makes it seem like they aren't willing to respect the source material above their sales agenda. They also need to learn to ease out their clips. I think Youtube makes this worse but way too often Apple ads just seem to stop abruptly.
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram 
Self-conscious, pretentious. Atrocious narration. These ads (as did the previous one) make me wince.

What previous ads have you preferred? Advertising doesn't have to be directly product-focused and they've done this in previous ads. Spamsandwich suggested a shorter ad would have more 'impact'. This would assume that the response of the unsatisfied individual is mirrored across the majority of Apple's potential sales audience. It may not be. Apple's original ad on Youtube has over 1 million views and the like ratio is over 10:1.

Contrast that with Miley Cyrus' Wrecking Ball video with 500m views and a like ratio of just over 2:1. The Chatroulette parody of it however has 99m views and a like ratio of over 23:1.

Think Different is 107:1 but not as many views.

Justin Bieber's Baby has 972m views and a like ratio of 0.5 (more dislikes than likes for good reason).

The response to the ad seems to be healthy. Apple's old Genius ads have a like ratio below 1. The Get a Mac ones above 3:1. New Mac Pro ad above 5:1.
post #22 of 31
It would be interesting to correlate opinions about this ad to the viewers' tastes. Are people who like poetry, watching Nature on PBS or listening to classical music liable to have a more favorable opinion? To whom is the ad directed?

Bear in mind the highly successful iPod/iTunes commercials some years back. Who was the audience?

I admit to being a Fanatical Moderate. I Disdain the Inane. Vyizderzominymororzizazizdenderizorziz?

Reply

I admit to being a Fanatical Moderate. I Disdain the Inane. Vyizderzominymororzizazizdenderizorziz?

Reply
post #23 of 31

Last week I saw an ad showing people watching movies (with a emphasis on Pixar movies) and doing other stuff on their tablets with some inspiring words and imagery.  I thought "oh look it's that new Apple ad."  So I was surprised and disappointed when the tag line at the end was Google Play.  Google has definitely stolen a page from the Apple playbook on this one.

 

Update: here's a link to a story that includes the ad.  http://ausdroid.net/2014/01/03/google-releases-a-great-google-play-commercial-but-wont-let-you-see-it-officially/

post #24 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kibitzer View Post

It would be interesting to correlate opinions about this ad to the viewers' tastes. Are people who like poetry, watching Nature on PBS or listening to classical music liable to have a more favorable opinion? To whom is the ad directed?

Bear in mind the highly successful iPod/iTunes commercials some years back. Who was the audience?

It's probably not the case that people dislike poetry or music but people who are more interested in business, finance, engineering etc just won't care for it much. Didn't Apple run a 'Think indifferent' campaign for them at one point? Or was that Microsoft? I just searched for this figuring someone had to have made something and found this on Youtube:



I think some people just want Apple to be a successful business. Validation for their commitment to capitalism and consider advertising to be just another investment that exists to get a measurable financial return. I find it funny how some of the most valuable companies in the world are run by people who think the polar opposite of that.

There seems to exist a very persistent divider that cuts down the middle of society and it's most evident in politics. Between the selfish and the selfless, creative and clinical, liberal and conservative. There are crossovers but you tend to find the main groupings go together.

People who are interested more in business and finance aim for success as far it applies to themselves regardless of others. It's about numbers, competition, percentages, growth and focus on possession or ownership.

More creative types don't really have the same drive. The reward doesn't come from ownership and amassing possessions, it's all about the expression. This likely contributes to this group being poorer.

The people at Apple are not business types - remember the line 'we don't wear suits, we don't even own suits':

http://www.businessinsider.com/steve-jobs-were-apple-we-dont-wear-suits-we-dont-even-own-suits-2010-7

Tim owns a suit and wears it, which is understandable as he was SVP of operations but he has the utmost respect for creativity and has far more qualities of the creative category than the other.

When Apple puts out ads like this, it's not just about the audience. It's a mark of their own identity. They have stated this publicly many times over the years. They have to avoid forgetting who they are and what matters to them. The business-focused people just want more growth, more products, more options, more money and these ads won't satisfy that.

This is the quality I respect most about Apple. I don't want to see them ever become a company solely focused on growth and earnings because that's not what people respect them for. People in the financial world use a phrase 'net worth' and it's intended as a measure of value but it is calculated by takings. If Steve Jobs has taken ownership of $5b and Carl Icahn has taken $5b then they are given an equivalent net worth. This is a corruption of the true meaning of value as far as it applies to people because it is self-value. If I own $5b, my worth as it applies to other people is zero if I keep hold of it. The value becomes the potential that I won't hold onto it and use it to give to other people, increasing their 'net worth'. That's the important part: giving, not taking.

Steve Jobs' net worth wasn't his takings of over $5b, it wasn't even his potential to give it away. It was in the changes he was instrumental in bringing about that millions of people benefit from every day. The advert is nothing to do with poetry, that's just a frame for the question 'What will your verse be?'. The iPad is their latest contribution to the world, what will yours be? That question doesn't have a limited demographic. It may have been framed differently so that people recognise what's being asked but it couldn't really have been spelled out more clearly.

This ad is who they are, they are creative, they respect creativity and passion and they've contributed positively to the world. While they have $150b in the bank and take in $40b every year, it's what they've given that makes them one of the most valuable companies in the world and they should never forget it.
post #25 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marvin View Post


This is the quality I respect most about Apple. I don't want to see them ever become a company solely focused on growth and earnings because that's not what people respect them for. People in the financial world use a phrase 'net worth' and it's intended as a measure of value but it is calculated by takings. If Steve Jobs has taken ownership of $5b and Carl Icahn has taken $5b then they are given an equivalent net worth. This is a corruption of the true meaning of value as far as it applies to people because it is self-value. If I own $5b, my worth as it applies to other people is zero if I keep hold of it. The value becomes the potential that I won't hold onto it and use it to give to other people, increasing their 'net worth'. That's the important part: giving, not taking.
 

 

You are reading way too much into a specific financial term.  "Net worth" is not a judgement, it's a specific measure.  If own a million dollar home, but owe $900,000 on it and have $100,000 in credit card debt (and no other assets or debts), my net worth is zero.  Am I "worthless?"  Would a "financial person" say I have no worth?  Of course not.  And nothing about this definition involves "taking" or "giving."

 

And when people say Apple is the most valuable company in the world (when that is true), it's only based on the current share price and the number of shares outstanding.  It doesn't mean "if there were one company in the world that I could save and all the others will disappear, Apple is the one I would save."

 

Also, I find it interesting that Google's Google Play "heart" ad (see my prior post just above), tugs on all the same heart strings that Apple's does.  Does that mean that that's who Google is too?

post #26 of 31

I too think the narration is weak. The ad is not about promoting Apple's philosophy or innovation. It is clearly about selling the iPad. In most of the use cases in the video, the users have gone to some rather unbelievable extremes, on some mountain top, under water or storm chasing. Some of the uses depicted require specialized accessories. In my opinion an iPad is not really the best tool for professional photography which is prominently featured in several of the cases. I'd say pretty much none of the use cases are very typical. I much preferred the previous iPad ads that showed the device being used in a manner that would appeal to average people rather than these unusual usage scenarios.

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

Reply

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

Reply
post #27 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marvin View Post


It's probably not the case  ...... it's what they've given that makes them one of the most valuable companies in the world and they should never forget it.

(I redacted most of your post only for the sake of brevity.) Many thanks for the thought that you put into it. I agree with you on some points and differ on others, as are others who are commenting on this thread. We probably can agree that Apple is partial to making a thoughtful cultural impact, which links to building interest among a particular portion of existing and potential customers. They're not trying to appeal to the consumer segment that responds to breakdancers who spin around and flap the screens open and shut on their Windows 8 touchscreen laptops.

I admit to being a Fanatical Moderate. I Disdain the Inane. Vyizderzominymororzizazizdenderizorziz?

Reply

I admit to being a Fanatical Moderate. I Disdain the Inane. Vyizderzominymororzizazizdenderizorziz?

Reply
post #28 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

I too think the narration is weak. The ad is not about promoting Apple's philosophy or innovation. It is clearly about selling the iPad. In most of the use cases in the video, the users have gone to some rather unbelievable extremes, on some mountain top, under water or storm chasing. Some of the uses depicted require specialized accessories. In my opinion an iPad is not really the best tool for professional photography which is prominently featured in several of the cases. I'd say pretty much none of the use cases are very typical. I much preferred the previous iPad ads that showed the device being used in a manner that would appeal to average people rather than these unusual usage scenarios.

What matters more, your opinion or the people who actually are using the iPad in those situations?
post #29 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by jungmark View Post


What matters more, your opinion or the people who actually are using the iPad in those situations?

 

Uh, no... what matters more is the effect the ad has on sales. Up is good... sideways and down are bad.

na na na na na...
Reply
na na na na na...
Reply
post #30 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cash907 View Post
 

If there were any truth in advertising, these ads would show people blogging from the toilet on their iPads. Might not be inspirational, but I gotta say it's been one of my favorite uses for a tablet. :-)

By the way, your mom has been trying to reach you. She wants to make sure that you clean both your hands and your iPad screen afterwards!

I admit to being a Fanatical Moderate. I Disdain the Inane. Vyizderzominymororzizazizdenderizorziz?

Reply

I admit to being a Fanatical Moderate. I Disdain the Inane. Vyizderzominymororzizazizdenderizorziz?

Reply
post #31 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by malax View Post

Also, I find it interesting that Google's Google Play "heart" ad (see my prior post just above), tugs on all the same heart strings that Apple's does.  Does that mean that that's who Google is too?

I wouldn't say it's particularly interesting or surprising that they put out these kind of ads too, the people who work at Google are very much like the people at Apple. That's why I described Apple as one of the most valuable companies in the world and not exclusively, Google is another. They just go about their business in a different way. The advertising on its own isn't enough either. Microsoft could very well hire an ad agency that gave them a meaningful ad and it wouldn't mean anything because it doesn't match their business. Apple's ads are meaningful because they are true to themselves and they are consistent.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: iPad
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPad › Apple releases two 'Your Verse' iPad Air ads