or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › General › General Discussion › Photos show painstaking building restorations completed at Apple's new Brisbane, Australia store
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Photos show painstaking building restorations completed at Apple's new Brisbane, Australia store

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
Apple's two-year-long effort to restore Brisbane's historic MacArthur Chambers building has borne fruit with the opening of the company's newest Australian flagship store, and new pictures offer a closer look at the efforts made to restore the building.

Apple Store Brisbane


Photographs taken at a pre-opening press availability last week by Australian publication Reckoner reveal the meticulous nature of the restoration, which extends all the way to the individually-polished marble tiles that form a mosaic at the store's entrance.

Apple Store Brisbane


The store's mezzanine level was also overhauled, though there appear to be no plans to open it to the public at this point. Apple removed and restored the mezzanine's original wooden railing.

Apple Store Brisbane


Apple Store Brisbane


Apple appears to have taken great care not to overwhelm the store's historic touches with modern upgrades. The acoustic dampeners and LED-backlit displays have been custom-made to fit in with the store's architectural features.

Apple Store Brisbane


Apple Store Brisbane


Plans for the store were first revealed in 2011 with an estimated cost for the renovation of nearly $12 million. The 1930s-era building served as the area headquarters for U.S. general Douglas MacArthur during World War II.
post #2 of 14
This is like the Barcelona store in that I don't see an easy way for physically impaired or wheelchair-bound customers to access. Accessibility in iOS is great if you can actually get into the store to buy the product.
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of a rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
Reply
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of a rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
Reply
post #3 of 14

I love the way Apple respects a city's architecture.

 

I can't remember which famous architect said it, "we get the architecture we deserve." He was talking about modern architecture. I think.

 

With most modern buildings I can't tell if they're an office building, school or a cyanide factory. 

 

Best!

post #4 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland View Post

This is like the Barcelona store in that I don't see an easy way for physically impaired or wheelchair-bound customers to access. Accessibility in iOS is great if you can actually get into the store to buy the product.


I hear you on this one. For what it's worth, I believe the entrance on the other side is part of a shopping mall, and the entrance on that end is accessible. Maybe that's where they expect most people to enter, where as the street front side is to be more of an advertisement for car traffic. I'm not sure though, as I've never been to Brisbane.

In the end, it's not an ideal solution, and I'm sure is a pain for some people who can't do stairs. But maybe it wasn't feasible to demolish walls, columns, etc. to make room for a ramp given the historic nature of the building and the fact that it sits right at the edge of a public sidewalk. It can be tricky since the architects aren't dealing with a clean slate to work from.

One thing's for sure though.......there'd be no way my 73 yr old mother could make it up those stairs with her arthritic knees.
post #5 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland View Post

This is like the Barcelona store in that I don't see an easy way for physically impaired or wheelchair-bound customers to access. Accessibility in iOS is great if you can actually get into the store to buy the product.

Looks like somebody is cranky today. The stores look pretty amazing to me. I'm glad Apple works hard not to change the fundamental structure of important historic buildings.
Quote:
Originally Posted by christopher126 View Post

I love the way Apple respects a city's architecture.

I can't remember which famous architect said it, "we get the architecture we deserve." He was talking about modern architecture. I think.

With most modern buildings I can't tell if they're an office building, school or a cyanide factory. 

Best!

I like that quote. I tried to find the author, but struck out. I think modern architecture had good intentions, but resulted in some tragically bad buildings, particularly the socialist-inspired housing projects. I think Apple has proven modernist architecture can work, as long as it is executed perfectly, and in the appropriate context, where minimalism and neutrality are a desirable (e.g. Museums, Apple stores, public venues).

   

Reply

   

Reply
post #6 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland View Post

This is like the Barcelona store in that I don't see an easy way for physically impaired or wheelchair-bound customers to access. Accessibility in iOS is great if you can actually get into the store to buy the product.

The mall entrance on the opposite side is accessible. There's also an elevator in the building.

 

Not a big deal.

 

Note: many industrialized countries have regulations concerning accessibility, the USA is pretty good on that front. My guess is that Australia has similar laws. With passing years, the regulations get more stringent, not more lenient.

 

Being in a hilly town like San Francisco does not exempt businesses from following regulations. In fact, there are certain law firms that earn their living by suing businesses for not being compliant with accessibility laws.

post #7 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnpierre View Post

I hear you on this one. For what it's worth, I believe the entrance on the other side is part of a shopping mall, and the entrance on that end is accessible. Maybe that's where they expect most people to enter, where as the street front side is to be more of an advertisement for car traffic. I'm not sure though, as I've never been to Brisbane.

You can look at the architectural drawings here:

 

http://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/696628/macarthur/urdesJraLD.pdf

 

On the plans you can see that there are several entrances without stairs, both around the corner on Edwards Street as well as on the other side of the building. They also installed a new lift inside for access to the second floor.

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

Reply

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

Reply
post #8 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by mpantone View Post
 
 In fact, there are certain law firms that earn their living by suing businesses for not being compliant with accessibility laws.

 

 

Quote: http://www.utsandiego.com/news/2011/Apr/18/are-disabled-people/
 

While many lawsuits are based on genuine concerns about accessibility, some are “drive-by” suits filed by people who haven’t been customers (some claim that they attempted to access the business without success) and are seeking a monetary settlement. “I’ve seen people use Google Street View to go out and assess a site,” said Paul Joelson, an architect and state-approved inspector with Joelson Vail Associates in San Diego.

One of the best-known plaintiffs in San Diego is attorney Theodore Pinnock, who has targeted hundreds of businesses to force compliance with disability laws and has received many settlement payments.

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

Reply

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

Reply
post #9 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by PatchyThePirate View Post

I like that quote. I tried to find the author, but struck out. I think modern architecture had good intentions, but resulted in some tragically bad buildings, particularly the socialist-inspired housing projects. I think Apple has proven modernist architecture can work, as long as it is executed perfectly, and in the appropriate context, where minimalism and neutrality are a desirable (e.g. Museums, Apple stores, public venues).

Well said, Patchy! :)

 

I like minimalism, too. Except when it starts looking like a scandinavian sanatorium! :) I have a friend who likes modern furniture and it looks like a Hyatt went out of business and sold all the furniture in their foyer.

 

My GF calls it "early Orthodontist!" :)

 

Best.

 

P.S. You didn't like my "...office building, school or a cyanide factory" quote? :) 


Edited by christopher126 - 1/23/14 at 12:15pm
post #10 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland View Post

This is like the Barcelona store in that I don't see an easy way for physically impaired or wheelchair-bound customers to access. Accessibility in iOS is great if you can actually get into the store to buy the product.

 

Obviously when using historic buildings there are guidelines Apple has to follow to leave the facade intact, there are other entrances for the disabled.

A problem occurred with this webpage so it was reloaded.A problem occurred with this webpage so it was reloaded.A problem occurred with this webpage so it was reloaded.A problem occurred with this...
Reply
A problem occurred with this webpage so it was reloaded.A problem occurred with this webpage so it was reloaded.A problem occurred with this webpage so it was reloaded.A problem occurred with this...
Reply
post #11 of 14

Wow.   Really well done as usual Apple.  Nice blend of keeping it both historic and Applesque

post #12 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by christopher126 View Post

Well said, Patchy! 1smile.gif

I like minimalism, too. Except when it starts looking like a scandinavian sanatorium! 1smile.gif I have a friend who likes modern furniture and it looks like a Hyatt went out of business and sold all the furniture in their foyer.

My GF calls it "early Orthodontist!" 1smile.gif

Best.

P.S. You didn't like my "...office building, school or a cyanide factory" quote? 1smile.gif 

It's a great quote 1smile.gif Those "true" modernist buildings do seem pretty dystopian; and the funny thing is they were shooting for utopian haha.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Frood View Post

Wow.   Really well done as usual Apple.  Nice blend of keeping it both historic and Applesque

I like how Apple just hung a flag out in front and that's it. Instead of forcing a glowing Apple logo that may have been awkward for this facade. I very much appreciate that despite Apple's size and importance they are still able to avoid succumbing to hubris.. As opposed to some other tech companies who prefer to assault the senses with obnoxious primary colors, or giant barges lol.

   

Reply

   

Reply
post #13 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by PatchyThePirate View Post


It's a great quote 1smile.gif Those "true" modernist buildings do seem pretty dystopian; and the funny thing is they were shooting for utopian haha.
I like how Apple just hung a flag out in front and that's it. Instead of forcing a glowing Apple logo that may have been awkward for this facade. I very much appreciate that despite Apple's size and importance they are still able to avoid succumbing to hubris.. As opposed to some other tech companies who prefer to assault the senses with obnoxious primary colors, or giant barges lol.

 

:)

 

The flag was one of the first things I noticed, too. I was looking for frosted glass Apple logo in over the door. Very classy and very Apple! :)

 

Best.

post #14 of 14

It looks old and new at the same time. No, not a TARDIS, a successful restoration! Well done Apple.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Discussion
AppleInsider › Forums › General › General Discussion › Photos show painstaking building restorations completed at Apple's new Brisbane, Australia store