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iWork for iCloud gets iOS7-inspired look, new document and security features

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 
Apple on Thursday rolled out another update to its nascent iWork for iCloud web productivity suite that brought a new flat user interface and added key features like password protection and keyboard shortcuts.

iWork for iCloud


The most prominent of Thursday's changes revolved around the suite's trumpeted collaboration features. Users can now add passwords to spreadsheets, presentations, and documents and share those password-protected files with others.

In addition, the apps sport a new way for users to see which files they have been granted access to by others. VoiceOver support has also been improved for accessibility-minded users, and new keyboard shortcuts for rotating, resizing, and repositioning objects have been added.

Numbers was given the ability to flow text into adjacent cells and to apply rich text formatting to text in table cells, features present in the desktop version but missing from the web variant until now. Users can also take advan

Both Pages and Keynote now support tables with customizable formatting. Pages also gained support for styling anchored and inline images, shapes, and text boxes, as well as the ability to edit endnotes in Microsoft Word documents.

Alongside the new features, Apple promises its usual smattering of bug fixes and stability improvements.
post #2 of 23

Not sure if this sinew (is to me), but I noticed how notifications now pop in at the top of the browser window. iCloud is coming of age.

post #3 of 23
I use it all the time, I have all my spending budgeted and actual transactions in Numbers spreadsheet and I can update it on the go using my iPhone so I always know how much money I have before making spending decisions and see the effect it will have on my balances into the future all stored in the cloud. Then I can go over and make final tweaks from my laptop at home , all shared with my wife so we are always on top of our spending

Originally by Rickers - 2014 : Cook & will bury Apple.  They can only ride Steve's ghost so long.


History reduce Apple Watch.... to a footnote in the annals of technology - Benjamin Frost Dec 2014



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Originally by Rickers - 2014 : Cook & will bury Apple.  They can only ride Steve's ghost so long.


History reduce Apple Watch.... to a footnote in the annals of technology - Benjamin Frost Dec 2014



Reply
post #4 of 23

If this is 'coming of age,' then all I can say is that we, as Apple fans, must have rather low expectations.

 

At the moment, iCloud is a pathetically limited product in terms of functionality. Unless I can store all forms of data and can have substantially more storage cheaper on a per GB basis, it is not useful for much more cute-sy home-related media. (Granted, the one useful feature is iTunes Match). There are many better alternatives.

 

Incidentally, does anyone know: did the ability to export files to iWork09 disappear in iCloud? If so, it has become all more useless for my needs!

 

Add: This is was in reply to paxman.

post #5 of 23
Did they finally add track changes for shared documents? If not, then this still doesn't do what I need it to do. I often work with people half way across the world. Thus, we are not easily able to work on the same document at the same time. So, we need an easy way to see what changes and comments the other has made. At this time the only way for us to do this is to send files back and forth with track changes turned on.

The whole point of being able to share documents is the ability to track changes between editors. The fact that Apple didn't add this is a major oversight on their part. When they add this, then I will use iWorks for iCloud a lot more often.
post #6 of 23

@anantksundaram Think you may be looking for a Google Drive or DropBox type service, both available FOC.

post #7 of 23

While I don't think iCloud is as full featured as some of the competition, I think with the new leadership structure, things are moving at a better clip than before.

 

I will say this though. My mom loves using iCloud on her MacBook Air and iPad. It is infinitely easier for her than using something like Dropbox which depends on file structure.

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post
 

If this is 'coming of age,' then all I can say is that we, as Apple fans, must have rather low expectations.

 

At the moment, iCloud is a pathetically limited product in terms of functionality. Unless I can store all forms of data and can have substantially more storage cheaper on a per GB basis, it is not useful for much more cute-sy home-related media. (Granted, the one useful feature is iTunes Match). There are many better alternatives.

 

Incidentally, does anyone know: did the ability to export files to iWork09 disappear in iCloud? If so, it has become all more useless for my needs!

 

Add: This is was in reply to paxman.

post #8 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by foad View Post
 

I will say this though. My mom loves using iCloud on her MacBook Air and iPad. 

Kind of proves my point....:D 

post #9 of 23

The more stuff looks like iOS7, the less I am impressed.  

 

 

We are regressing.

 

Your = the possessive of you, as in, "Your name is Tom, right?" or "What is your name?"

 

You're = a contraction of YOU + ARE as in, "You are right" --> "You're right."

 

 

Reply

 

Your = the possessive of you, as in, "Your name is Tom, right?" or "What is your name?"

 

You're = a contraction of YOU + ARE as in, "You are right" --> "You're right."

 

 

Reply
post #10 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bergermeister View Post

The more stuff looks like iOS7, the less I am impressed.  


We are regressing.
Who's we? Who are you speaking on behalf of? The apps I've used look a lot like OSX.
post #11 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post
 

Kind of proves my point....:D 

 

I wasn't arguing against you. I was simply stating that for the majority of users outside of the technically savvy bunch, I think it works well. Although, my mom runs her business on it with documents and spreadsheets all stored in it, so I wouldn't say just cutesy home-related media stuff.

 

I, like you, think that the cost of increased storage is bonkers. Hopefully they tweak that this year. Arguing against myself though, Apple doesn't deduct space from your iCloud allotment for people that are really into the ecosystem and buying movies, tv shows and music from iTunes, so it is a bit different than some other alternative ways of having increased storage like Dropbox. Ultimately, iCloud isn't the best solution for everyone, but for a lot of people, dare I say most, it is a solid solution. I absolutely think it can be improved upon, but for those that just want a simple and straight forward solution, it isn't bad.

 

As a side note, I'd like to see Apple open up the OS a little so there is a bit more interoperability. There have been an increasing number of signs that they have been working on APIs to do just that. Hopefully we see them in iOS 8.

post #12 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by foad View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post
 

Kind of proves my point....:D 

 

I wasn't arguing against you. I was simply stating that for the majority of users outside of the technically savvy bunch, I think it works well. Although, my mom runs her business on it with documents and spreadsheets all stored in it, so I wouldn't say just cutesy home-related media stuff.

 

I, like you, think that the cost of increased storage is bonkers. Hopefully they tweak that this year. Arguing against myself though, Apple doesn't deduct space from your iCloud allotment for people that are really into the ecosystem and buying movies, tv shows and music from iTunes, so it is a bit different than some other alternative ways of having increased storage like Dropbox. Ultimately, iCloud isn't the best solution for everyone, but for a lot of people, dare I say most, it is a solid solution. I absolutely think it can be improved upon, but for those that just want a simple and straight forward solution, it isn't bad.

 

As a side note, I'd like to see Apple open up the OS a little so there is a bit more interoperability. There have been an increasing number of signs that they have been working on APIs to do just that. Hopefully we see them in iOS 8.

I realize.... I was just kidding. No offense intended!

post #13 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post
 

I realize.... I was just kidding. No offense intended!

 

 

I know you were. :D

post #14 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post
 

If this is 'coming of age,' then all I can say is that we, as Apple fans, must have rather low expectations.

 

At the moment, iCloud is a pathetically limited product in terms of functionality. Unless I can store all forms of data and can have substantially more storage cheaper on a per GB basis, it is not useful for much more cute-sy home-related media. (Granted, the one useful feature is iTunes Match). There are many better alternatives.

 

Incidentally, does anyone know: did the ability to export files to iWork09 disappear in iCloud? If so, it has become all more useless for my needs!

 

Add: This is was in reply to paxman.

Sure, I know what you are saying and I realize Numbers and Pages will never match the functionality of MS Office, and I am absolutely fine with that. But iCloud is getting better and very much more useful and I am conveniently committed to the platform. Simplicity is worth a lot if the functionality is sufficient. 

 

There are other very useful services, I agree. I particularly like Google Forms. Very quick to create and use and a great way to enter data consistently. I also use DropBox. 

 

I don't think iCloud will ever turn into a feature heavy service for semi-pros. I, like everybody else here, I suspect, would have liked Apple to own DropBox, however. (I'd also like Apple to own Weebly, though I'm sure it never will)

post #15 of 23

The whole iOS 7 look is extremely nauseating and difficult to use. It's not intuitive as the iOS 6. It has WAY too much whiteness. The text are anorexic. And the icons are way too gaudy that makes reading more difficult. I had to configure my iPhone to emulate iOS6 as much as possible - dark backgrounds, bold text, and so forth. But the overall UI is just NOT pleasant. 

 

May switch to Windoze and Samsung phones on next major purchases. I just cannot stand iOS7. 

post #16 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post
 

Kind of proves my point....:D 

All it proves is his mum understands what iCloud is all about and you don't. ;)

 

We don't need file structure any more we need application dependant storage because application dependant storage makes more sense than file structure.

 

File structure makes for a convoluted display of files that have nothing to do with the application at hand. Why do I need to see PDFs in Pages when Pages can't do anything with PDFs? Why do I need to see Excel spreadsheets in Pages when once again I can't do anything with them.

 

However the current approach whereby in iCloud I can see only the files Pages can handle just makes logical sense. I don't need to file things in anything other than folders of documents that should be grouped together. I don't need to worry about whether or not my application can indeed do something with the files in the list I KNOW it can.

 

A file structure display is so '90s and needs to die.

post #17 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bergermeister View Post

The more stuff looks like iOS7, the less I am impressed.  


We are regressing.

Yes!! I can't believe this is considered "good". Ive is not a GUI designer. He's ruining Apple's sense of GUI design excellence. Clueless!!!
post #18 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Darryn Lowe View Post

All it proves is his mum understands what iCloud is all about and you don't. 1wink.gif

We don't need file structure any more we need application dependant storage because application dependant storage makes more sense than file structure.

File structure makes for a convoluted display of files that have nothing to do with the application at hand. Why do I need to see PDFs in Pages when Pages can't do anything with PDFs? Why do I need to see Excel spreadsheets in Pages when once again I can't do anything with them.

However the current approach whereby in iCloud I can see only the files Pages can handle just makes logical sense. I don't need to file things in anything other than folders of documents that should be grouped together. I don't need to worry about whether or not my application can indeed do something with the files in the list I KNOW it can.

A file structure display is so '90s and needs to die.

With all due respect, you sound like a home user with delusions of tech grandeur.

But I am glad the future of file structures work for you.
post #19 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by dysamoria View Post


Yes!! I can't believe this is considered "good". Ive is not a GUI designer. He's ruining Apple's sense of GUI design excellence. Clueless!!!


What don't you like about it? I didn't use it a lot since the update, but it looks fine.

I don't see how something can regress if they add back features.

 

And it's not like Ive is doing all the work by himself, isolated in his office.

post #20 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post


With all due respect, you sound like a home user with delusions of tech grandeur.

But I am glad the future of file structures work for you.

With all due respect you don't know what you're talking about.

 

I work in IT I use nothing but iWork apps for my word-processing and spreadsheet needs and that includes writing documentation and processes and the like.

 

I need mobility, portability, and while I might not need a whole lot of power, from what I've seen from large corporations and government departments that I work for neither do MOST people.

 

File structures are ridiculous and when you see the amount of effort that's required on large scales you quickly come to the realisation that they are inefficient and something better MUST come soon and it MUST be done at an OS level otherwise no one will accept it readily.

 

Document management systems are good but you have to get everyone using it and when you're working over different departments you need to spend a whole lot of time and money to give people only the access they need. You can't do it on the web because it's too cumbersome and reliant on plugins like Java and Flash. You can work it into the OS quite easily though and that's what I believe Apple is doing.

 

The old idea of the file structure is too convoluted for today's massive data needs. File get missing because we forget where we put it or someone has moved it. By having something like the iCloud screen for documents you've made it much easier to see what's going on because you've removed all of the crap that isn't applicable to the task you are currently in the process of.

 

Name me one good reason that the current file structure methodology makes sense given the amount of data we use daily.

post #21 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Darryn Lowe View Post
 

With all due respect you don't know what you're talking about.

 

I work in IT I use nothing but iWork apps for my word-processing and spreadsheet needs and that includes writing documentation and processes and the like.

 

I need mobility, portability, and while I might not need a whole lot of power, from what I've seen from large corporations and government departments that I work for neither do MOST people.

 

File structures are ridiculous and when you see the amount of effort that's required on large scales you quickly come to the realisation that they are inefficient and something better MUST come soon and it MUST be done at an OS level otherwise no one will accept it readily.

 

Document management systems are good but you have to get everyone using it and when you're working over different departments you need to spend a whole lot of time and money to give people only the access they need. You can't do it on the web because it's too cumbersome and reliant on plugins like Java and Flash. You can work it into the OS quite easily though and that's what I believe Apple is doing.

 

The old idea of the file structure is too convoluted for today's massive data needs. File get missing because we forget where we put it or someone has moved it. By having something like the iCloud screen for documents you've made it much easier to see what's going on because you've removed all of the crap that isn't applicable to the task you are currently in the process of.

 

Name me one good reason that the current file structure methodology makes sense given the amount of data we use daily.

What a rambling, nonsensical post.

 

First, it would appear that you work for yourself, and don’t have to share a whole heck of a lot of different file formats (other than Pages and Numbers) with a whole heck of a lot of people. Second, you go on mobility and portability, but no cloud – including Apple’s – is anywhere near foolproof and 100% reliable with either. Third, you confuse the fact that something MUST come soon and MUST be done with the solution somehow being found in what you think Apple is currently doing. Fourth, you conflate issues of file structures with pap about Java and Flash. Fifth, you talk about people’s ‘massive data needs’ and yet, in Para 2 you say ‘most people’ are unlikely to need lots of power.

 

I could go on.

 

Most importantly, you appear to have not read my original post, which was only about three things (and a side question) – openness to all file types, larger storage, and cost per GB: it would really help if you are capable of following a thread of ideas, rather than jump in with self-important, confusing, contradictory ideas half-way through a conversation.

post #22 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post
 

What a rambling, nonsensical post.

 

First, it would appear that you work for yourself, and don’t have to share a whole heck of a lot of different file formats (other than Pages and Numbers) with a whole heck of a lot of people. Second, you go on mobility and portability, but no cloud – including Apple’s – is anywhere near foolproof and 100% reliable with either. Third, you confuse the fact that something MUST come soon and MUST be done with the solution somehow being found in what you think Apple is currently doing. Fourth, you conflate issues of file structures with pap about Java and Flash. Fifth, you talk about people’s ‘massive data needs’ and yet, in Para 2 you say ‘most people’ are unlikely to need lots of power.

 

I could go on.

 

Most importantly, you appear to have not read my original post, which was only about three things (and a side question) – openness to all file types, larger storage, and cost per GB: it would really help if you are capable of following a thread of ideas, rather than jump in with self-important, confusing, contradictory ideas half-way through a conversation.

Wow, you could be more wrong if it was the wrongest day of the wrongest week of the wrongest month of the Chinese year of Wrong Wrong.

 

I don't work for myself I use multiple file formats all the time dealing with iWork formats to MS Office formats and even very ancient formats so don't presume anything. But that is a moot argument anyway because what I said was you only need to display the file formats that the application can handle. What part of "application dependant storage" (I mentioned this two posts ago but you've only taken me from one post so clearly you aren't understanding what's being said at all) do you not understand?

 

I work in iWork but I deal with documents from all types of applications although mostly MS Office because that is what THE REST OF THE OFFICE uses. I bold that because this was the case when I was working for a massive IT company and it's still the case when I decided to work for a smaller company because the lifestyle was better. I deal with ridiculous amounts of people from large government departments to small 1 man operations so I see people's data requirements ALL THE TIME. From what I've seen of these varied sites is that their data needs using a standard file structure is a complete mess. You listen to the people who are forced to try and find files and EVERY SINGLE ONE OF THEM will tell you it's a joke trying to find something.

 

By having application dependant storage you simply open the application you want to use and it will list all the file formats it can use. How is this a bad thing? If you have a 33/33/33 split of .doc/.xls/.pdf then straight away by opening Pages you've dropped 66% of all files from display making it far easier to find what you're after.

 

iCloud can handle ANY file format that the applications are willing to upload to it. It literally has NO limits to what it can handle. The limits come from the application and that makes sense. There is no point displaying file formats the application can't handle. I cannot in any way see how this is beneficial to the users. Tell me one way it is.

 

Larger storage and cost per GB is different on the cloud to local HDD. The thing people fail to realise is for every GB you have access to THEY have to pay for the data you upload to it. The mere fact you've got 5GB for your storage is pretty amazing considering they have millions of customers. That's petabytes of storage they give us for FREE. They have to pay for people to upload files to that storage space. I seriously doubt ISPs will be giving Apple and Google and the like free rides on this sort of thing. To remain profitable they have to impose limits. That cost for extra space will include rates that pay for data traffic to help make the service worthwhile. It's not all about storage space when it comes to the cloud.

 

My reference to Java and Flash was - if you were actually reading my post - in relation to web based document management systems. It was part of an entire paragraph about document management systems. It was in relation to why they are good but flawed in general. I've dealt with a good number of these systems and every single one of them had flaws either in the application or the implementation. I said this sort of thing must be done at OS level to make it available to all people. I've seen companies using three different document management systems and getting annoyed  at why they can't share their documents easily. Like I said. Changes need to be at the OS level and Apple is slowly making those changes but they're also doing it at the application level.

 

You claim I wasn't reading your post but hypocritically you did the exact same thing. I've been in the game long enough to know the current file structure we use today is massively flawed and cannot handle our data requirements. The way iCloud currently works by leaving it up to the application is in my not so humble opinion the BEST way at the moment for our needs. It's dead easy to use, it's specific, and it saves time. Implementing another DropBox or Google Drive or whatever is a very bad idea. When you see how large corporations are having to manage their data you'll understand. I have and I KNOW we need to change.

post #23 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Darryn Lowe View Post
 

By having application dependant storage you simply open the application you want to use and it will list all the file formats it can use. How is this a bad thing? If you have a 33/33/33 split of .doc/.xls/.pdf then straight away by opening Pages you've dropped 66% of all files from display making it far easier to find what you're after.

Isn't that the way apps already work?  If I'm in Word and go to the Open dialog, I can only see .doc files unless you change the file type option.  If I'm in Photoshop, I can only see .psd.  I'm not disagreeing with your general viewpoint, but that particular gripe doesn't seem to be valid.

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