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Apple updates iWork suite for OS X and iOS with new features, bug fixes [u]

post #1 of 32
Thread Starter 
Coming on the heels of an updated iWork for iCloud, Apple on Thursday released refreshed Keynote versions for both OS X and iOS, adding new features like password-protected file sharing and productivity enhancements.

Update: It appears that Apple has removed the standalone Keynote Remote app from the iOS App Store as the latest Keynote for iOS makes its functionality redundant.

iWork


Keynote



Updates to Keynote for OS X and iOS come with new transitions, enhanced presenter display option and password-protected sharing via iCloud.

Keynote


In addition, the iOS app comes with a built-in remote feature likely to take the place of Apple's standalone Keynote Remote.

Both updates now allow users to create charts with date, time and duration values, while custom number formats in charts are now preserved when importing presentations from Keynote '09 and PowerPoint.

Finally, the new Keynote updates improve compatibility with Microsoft PowerPoint 2013 and include bug fixes and stability improvements.

For those who do not already own Keynote, the apps are priced at $19.99 for OS X and $9.99 for iOS.

Pages



Pages for iOS version 2.1 brings the same password-based sharing capabilities as Keynote, allowing users to securely collaborate on documents via iCloud. For easy file handling, a shared documents can be viewed as a list on iWork for iCloud beta.

Pages


The most substantial of Apple's updates, Pages for iOS also features a new character count tool, exporting password-protected documents to the DOCX format and automatic list creation using new special characters. Improvements are also applied to support of bidirectional text, ePub export and compatibility with Microsoft Word 2013 documents.

On the OS X side, Pages adds a vertical ruler, customizable alignment guides, keyboard shortcuts and the ability to delete section directly from the page navigator. Improvements were also made to inserting and pasting objects in addition to those mentioned with the above iOS version.

Pages is $19.99 for OS X and $9.99 for iOS

Numbers



Finally, Numbers for iOS version 2.1 offers the same password-protected document sharing, while adding a new feature that allows view and editing of spreadsheets in landscape orientation. This is a welcome enhancement especially for iPhone users with cramped screen real estate.

Numbers


Other additions include improved compatibility with Microsoft Excel 2013 spreadsheets, preservation of custom number formats in charts imported from Numbers '09 and Microsoft Excel spreadsheets and various bug fixes.

Numbers for Mac includes the same enhancements minus the screen orientation feature.

Numbers for OS X can be purchased for $19.99, while the iOS version is priced at $9.99.
post #2 of 32
Boo, hiss, KN 6 is simply a downgrade from KN 5, and this update hasn't changed that. Apple's risking losing a lot of people to PP. So far, I'm not quite there, but if KN 7 follows this latest path, I'm gone.
post #3 of 32
I look forward to downloading these updates and trying them out.
post #4 of 32
Notifications for versions 2.0.1 got pushed to my phone. This has happened a lot in the past, where an old version will appear in the App Store, but only later does it correct itself and allow you to install the new versions.
post #5 of 32
Glad the see the new icons aren't 2D.
post #6 of 32
I appears that Apple is pushing these out and keeping the Cloud, Mac and iOS versions compatible this time around. I would enjoy knowing if the current state of the iOS version is as feature rich as it once was?
"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
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"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
Reply
post #7 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by MoXoM View Post

I look forward to downloading these updates and trying them out.

I'm simply sorry that I did and that now, some documents have been demoted by requiring the new versions of Pages and Keynote to open. These are downgrades to previously excellent applications that should have had new, needed features added ahead of feature parity between iOS and OS X versions. The new versions pollute my computer.

Where are we on the curve? We'll know once it goes asymptotic!
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Where are we on the curve? We'll know once it goes asymptotic!
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post #8 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by IQatEdo View Post

I'm simply sorry that I did and that now, some documents have been demoted by requiring the new versions of Pages and Keynote to open. These are downgrades to previously excellent applications that should have had new, needed features added ahead of feature parity between iOS and OS X versions. The new versions pollute my computer.
I hate the required to have latest version message.

The latest updates are a good interface just lacking previous version features.
post #9 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by IQatEdo View Post
 

I'm simply sorry that I did and that now, some documents have been demoted by requiring the new versions of Pages and Keynote to open. These are downgrades to previously excellent applications that should have had new, needed features added ahead of feature parity between iOS and OS X versions. The new versions pollute my computer.

 

I see this type of statement here and there and I find it weird. First, installing the new versions doesn't delete the old versions. That gets rid of the teething pains people have been having. Second, if you opened a file and converted it to the new format by accident, you can export it to the legacy app. Additionally, you have the option of not converting a legacy file to the new version if you don't want to.

 

Ultimately, I think Apple knew that these releases didn't have feature parity with the old releases but they needed to get the ball rolling, and they took a conservative approach. You can keep using the old versions which have been working well enough for you until there is feature parity. I think that the amount of work that is evidently being put into the iWork suite lately is a strong sign that Apple is committed to it, which to be honest hasn't been the case for a long time.

post #10 of 32

Thanks, I take onboard your comments...

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by foad View Post
 

 

...I think that the amount of work that is evidently being put into the iWork suite lately is a strong sign that Apple is committed to it, which to be honest hasn't been the case for a long time.

 

However, what kind of apps are Apple committed to? The new versions sent me spinning, I was honestly expecting more sophisticated versions would be released. My understanding and I might not be correct, is that the new versions are complete re-writes. There's a lot of work in that, however, I consider them vanity releases. I'm now back with word, which is an utter dog but has features that I need and thought Pages 'might' have by now.

Where are we on the curve? We'll know once it goes asymptotic!
Reply
Where are we on the curve? We'll know once it goes asymptotic!
Reply
post #11 of 32
Still a crappy update with a lot of items missing. Just really unhappy with Apple's decisions to release this and then "corrupt" our documents with this new version such that we can't open them in '09.
post #12 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by IQatEdo View Post
 

 

However, what kind of apps are Apple committed to? The new versions sent me spinning, I was honestly expecting more sophisticated versions would be released. My understanding and I might not be correct, is that the new versions are complete re-writes. There's a lot of work in that, however, I consider them vanity releases. I'm now back with word, which is an utter dog but has features that I need and thought Pages 'might' have by now.

 

They are ground-up rewrites and you are correct, it is an intense amount of work. Because of the rewrites Apple is more able to do cross platform development and interoperability much quicker and easier than before. Do they have all the features of their competitors or even their old versions, nope. I am optimistic that they will get there though.

 

Apple does one thing that sometimes is rough to deal with but in the long run is beneficial to both them and to us users...they aren't afraid of getting rid of everything and starting from scratch. FCP was like that. Sure, they got a lot of grief for it but they have been on steady tick of adding features and in the long run, FCP is a much better product that is more forward thinking than most people give it credit for.

 

The reason that Word is an utter dog is because Microsoft is the opposite of Apple. They will sit on legacy code for as long as they can. When Microsoft dumps their legacy stuff, they have actually come up with some interesting products. I'd rather Apple take the approach they are taking right now and create solid base applications to build on top of, then sit of legacy code that they need to hack things to work with. I've been a programmer of different sorts for as long as I can remember, and starting with a clean slate is the most liberating thing in the world. It gives you the freedom to approach things from new angles, with new technologies.

post #13 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by ylon View Post

Still a crappy update with a lot of items missing. Just really unhappy with Apple's decisions to release this and then "corrupt" our documents with this new version such that we can't open them in '09.

 

Says who? That's completely wrong. When installing the new versions, the iWork '09 apps are moved to a subfolder so you can continue using them. Additionally, before even being able to make a change to a legacy document in the new versions, you are given the option to edit a copy, which doesn't touch your legacy file or just do an upgrade to the new format. You can even export to the legacy apps as well.

 

post #14 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by IQatEdo View Post

I'm simply sorry that I did and that now, some documents have been demoted by requiring the new versions of Pages and Keynote to open. These are downgrades to previously excellent applications that should have had new, needed features added ahead of feature parity between iOS and OS X versions. The new versions pollute my computer.

Yup. This "update" is still miles away from being an upgrade compared to the '09 versions.
post #15 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by foad View Post

Says who? That's completely wrong. When installing the new versions, the iWork '09 apps are moved to a subfolder so you can continue using them. Additionally, before even being able to make a change to a legacy document in the new versions, you are given the option to edit a copy, which doesn't touch your legacy file or just do an upgrade to the new format. You can even export to the legacy apps as well.



That must be new to this update. Did they fix the file association problem where Mac OS wouldn't let you configure Pages docs to open in '09?
post #16 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by dysamoria View Post


That must be new to this update. Did they fix the file association problem where Mac OS wouldn't let you configure Pages docs to open in '09?

 

It has been that way since the new versions were released. I know some folks were having problems but haven't heard it as a bug in a while. I just checked about being able to associate files to Pages '09 and didn't have a problem associating all .pages files associated to it.

post #17 of 32

I, as many others, have avoided updating to the new versions. Does anyone know of a list of missing features for the most current iWork versions, including the updates?

 

I only found a list of all that was missing from the .0 release (on the Apple Community Forums). It really seems like Apple is trying hard to get iWork back to business as usual (if still too slow for most, specially people that use them for work, like me), and I thing having the overview of what's there and what's missing would be a good idea, that's why the list is such a pain in the butt to get through.

 

Can anyone recommend a list that has been kept current?

post #18 of 32
I thought the iWork suite was a free for all now? Why the dollar charges for those that don't have it?
post #19 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1983 View Post

I thought the iWork suite was a free for all now? Why the dollar charges for those that don't have it?

 

Free with new devices, and free if you had iWork '09. You pay only if you want to get them for the first time for an older Mac or iOS device.

post #20 of 32
Nice, but there is the VERTICAL ruler? Anyone seen it?
post #21 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by foad View Post

They are ground-up rewrites and you are correct, it is an intense amount of work. Because of the rewrites Apple is more able to do cross platform development and interoperability much quicker and easier than before. Do they have all the features of their competitors or even their old versions, nope. I am optimistic that they will get there though.

Apple does one thing that sometimes is rough to deal with but in the long run is beneficial to both them and to us users...they aren't afraid of getting rid of everything and starting from scratch. FCP was like that. Sure, they got a lot of grief for it but they have been on steady tick of adding features and in the long run, FCP is a much better product that is more forward thinking than most people give it credit for.

The reason that Word is an utter dog is because Microsoft is the opposite of Apple. They will sit on legacy code for as long as they can. When Microsoft dumps their legacy stuff, they have actually come up with some interesting products. I'd rather Apple take the approach they are taking right now and create solid base applications to build on top of, then sit of legacy code that they need to hack things to work with. I've been a programmer of different sorts for as long as I can remember, and starting with a clean slate is the most liberating thing in the world. It gives you the freedom to approach things from new angles, with new technologies.
Totally agree with this post. OMG I've never seen so many cry babies in one forum. To the poster who thinks PowerPoint might be better than keynote: good riddance!
post #22 of 32

PAGES: Still no linking text flow from box to box. Still so many features which were so useful. Can someone at apple insider get on this. It's a disaster. I have so many projects I wrote in Pages that I can't even open for fear they will be ruined by this update. Find out why Apple did this update and pressure someone to fix it! We all hate it! Is there another option? Go back to Word, ugh. Help!

post #23 of 32
Originally Posted by knapp View Post
Can someone at apple insider get on this.

 

No. Because we’re not Apple.

 
I have so many projects I wrote in Pages that I can't even open for fear they will be ruined by this update.

 

Then don’t open them. Use Pages ’09.

 
Find out why Apple did this update and pressure someone to fix it!

 

We already know why. If you can’t understand it, go read about why.

 
We all hate it!

 

Speak for yourself.

 
Is there another option?

 

Keep using Pages ’09 like Apple itself tells you to do.

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

Reply

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

Reply
post #24 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by hspanhs View Post

Nice, but there is the VERTICAL ruler? Anyone seen it?

Turn it on in preferences. (Rulers -> Enable vertical ruler...)

post #25 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by IQatEdo View Post
 

 

However, what kind of apps are Apple committed to? The new versions sent me spinning, I was honestly expecting more sophisticated versions would be released. My understanding and I might not be correct, is that the new versions are complete re-writes. There's a lot of work in that, however, I consider them vanity releases. I'm now back with word, which is an utter dog but has features that I need and thought Pages 'might' have by now.

Then you kind of don't understand what Apple is doing. I hope you will soon and I understand that the new versions are missing features you may well need... it's missing a couple I need for ePUBs but they're not important.

 

Apple's simplification of the interface is welcome considering Microsoft is going the other way and making it more convoluted. I admit the idea of context sensitive editing takes a bit of getting used to but man once you get it you wonder why you've ever used any other way.

 

By the end of 6 months I suspect most of the old features that actually are needed will be there and ones that are going to blow your mind will be added and you'll see where Apple is going and why they are going there.

 

Give it time. It's FCPX all over again but in both cases the moved NEEDED to be made.

post #26 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Darryn Lowe View Post
 

Then you kind of don't understand what Apple is doing. I hope you will soon and I understand that the new versions are missing features you may well need... it's missing a couple I need for ePUBs but they're not important.

 

Apple's simplification of the interface is welcome considering Microsoft is going the other way and making it more convoluted. I admit the idea of context sensitive editing takes a bit of getting used to but man once you get it you wonder why you've ever used any other way.

 

By the end of 6 months I suspect most of the old features that actually are needed will be there and ones that are going to blow your mind will be added and you'll see where Apple is going and why they are going there.

 

Give it time. It's FCPX all over again but in both cases the moved NEEDED to be made.

 

Exactly. I welcome the feature parity approach they are taking because I spend a fair amount of time working on my rMBP and my iPad Air. The current solution is better than the old annoying dialog of not having the same features on iOS as on the Mac.

 

Funnily, Adobe took a different approach with Lightroom and developed a whole new app from the ground up. They have a lean and fast product in stark contrast to the vast majority of their popular apps that still sit on quite a bit of legacy code. 

 

I've noticed that as our lives have become more connected and because of the instant nature of the internet, people have become increasingly less patient. I'm guilty of this myself sometimes and I have to keep myself in check. Thinking back to when I was a kid and seeing how things were back then and how things are now, I miss those days sometimes. Patience is a virtue.

post #27 of 32
Hello!

I am very grateful for your help.

I am surprised they had hidden the ruler like that!

Kindest regards and a happy week-end!

HSPANHS
post #28 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by foad View Post

Exactly. I welcome the feature parity approach they are taking because I spend a fair amount of time working on my rMBP and my iPad Air. The current solution is better than the old annoying dialog of not having the same features on iOS as on the Mac.

Funnily, Adobe took a different approach with Lightroom and developed a whole new app from the ground up. They have a lean and fast product in stark contrast to the vast majority of their popular apps that still sit on quite a bit of legacy code. 

The "new from the ground up" approach is how Apple did the new iWorks too. The new apps are also 64-bit aware, so Apple should take this re-write well into the distant future. Apple has also announced that many old features will be added back in and the door is open to increase the feature -set to make pages more feature-filled than it once was.

However — Apple made a several blunders in how they released the re-writes:

1. Apple didn't warn anyone about the the feature shrink when they released the re-written apps. This caused a lot of ill-will that could have been avoided.
2. Apple didn't let anyone know that opening an old document in the new version of iWorks would destroy the formatting of the older document. So a lot of people freaked out over their lost work. Apple had a work-around (see next point) but again failed to properly prepare users of iWorks to potential problem or the work-around.
3. Apple kept the older version of iWorks on the iMacs, but didn't tell anyone that the old document formatting would be restored by opening them with the old version. This lack of communication earned Apple a lot of unnecessary ill-will and a lot of down-voting on the apps in the store.
4. Now, instead of people being happy with the progress Apple is doing with iWorks, they are still less-then-thrilled because of the past communications failures.

Apple did belatedly announce that many features would be added back in over a six-month period. I haven't been keeping a score, but (A) it seems we are about out of the 6-month window, and (B) we are a long way from the reaching the minimalist feature set of the iOS earlier version, and (C) a couple light years from the earlier OSX version.
"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
Reply
"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
Reply
post #29 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Macky the Macky View Post


The "new from the ground up" approach is how Apple did the new iWorks too. The new apps are also 64-bit aware, so Apple should take this re-write well into the distant future. Apple has also announced that many old features will be added back in and the door is open to increase the feature -set to make pages more feature-filled than it once was.

However — Apple made a several blunders in how they released the re-writes:

1. Apple didn't warn anyone about the the feature shrink when they released the re-written apps. This caused a lot of ill-will that could have been avoided.
2. Apple didn't let anyone know that opening an old document in the new version of iWorks would destroy the formatting of the older document. So a lot of people freaked out over their lost work. Apple had a work-around (see next point) but again failed to properly prepare users of iWorks to potential problem or the work-around.
3. Apple kept the older version of iWorks on the iMacs, but didn't tell anyone that the old document formatting would be restored by opening them with the old version. This lack of communication earned Apple a lot of unnecessary ill-will and a lot of down-voting on the apps in the store.
4. Now, instead of people being happy with the progress Apple is doing with iWorks, they are still less-then-thrilled because of the past communications failures.

Apple did belatedly announce that many features would be added back in over a six-month period. I haven't been keeping a score, but (A) it seems we are about out of the 6-month window, and (B) we are a long way from the reaching the minimalist feature set of the iOS earlier version, and (C) a couple light years from the earlier OSX version.

 

I agree with your 4 points, and I think that a fair amount of the animosity could have been avoided. Apple occasionally does have issues relaying their motives and intent with their customer base. That has been the case for some time. However, I think some of the animosity is trolling (Samsung is known for paying for trolling to happen), some of it is user error, some of it is miscommunication.

 

The thing with the internet is the mob mentality. Something small will blow up into a scandal rather quickly, and an Apple controversy will light up page views like few other topics will. The media knows this and fans the flames. I frequent sites like Asymco because Horace's articles are intelligent as are the discussions in the comments section. There are varying views present but in general people don't explode on each other.

 

I know iWork has nothing to do with that but the general consumption of news does and I think even with iWork, a lot of it got blown out of proportion. Some because of how Apple handled the situation and some because how the media handled it.

 

 

| edited for grammer |

post #30 of 32
Saw this posted on Macworld for those that might be interested in AppleScript support in iWork.

http://www.macworld.com/article/2090831/applescript-makes-a-comeback-in-numbers.html

There were a lot of folks freaking out about AppleScript support and so far, it looks like it was premature. This fresh code base looks like a good thing for the long term as it is giving Apple a robust foundation to work on.
post #31 of 32
I have no interest in building a keynote presentation on an iPhone or managing a complex numbers spreadsheet on an iPad - and nobody I know who uses iWorks for serious business purposes has any interest either.

iWorks was a shambles when released and still is. What was a smooth functioning, delightful to use, highly productive set of capabilities has become a time consuming, non-intiutive, clunky pig. Wake up Apple - the whole world doesn't orbit around the iPhone - millions of users have serious work to do and need the tools to do it. This means a decent sized screen, a full sized keypad and the functionality to complete the task - not reduced capabilities shoehorned onto small format, toy-town technology. There is a limit to how much time people are going to waste on dealing with these sorts of "updates". Either get your act together or lose the customer base. Its up to you Apple - and remember, history is littered with the corpses of much larger companies which lost sight of their customers needs .... .
post #32 of 32
Originally Posted by michaelpaull View Post
iWorks

 

iWork. At least get the name of the product you’ve never used correctly.

 
…was a shambles when released and still is.


lol no.

 
Wake up Apple

 

 
the whole world doesn't orbit around the iPhone - millions of users have serious work to do and need the tools to do it. This means a decent sized screen, a full sized keypad and the functionality to complete the task - not reduced capabilities shoehorned onto small format, toy-town technology.

 

So what on Earth are you pretending to say here? That Apple needs a bigger phone or they’re doomed or that the desktop version of iWork is somehow inadequate?

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

Reply

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

Reply
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