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Apple celebrates 30 years of Mac with special webpage, video

post #1 of 78
Thread Starter 
Apple changed the computing world forever 30 years ago today when it launched the first Macintosh. To commemorate the anniversary, the company posted to its website a video and interactive timeline chronicling not only the machine's history, but its effect on the world.

Mac 30


As of Friday, visitors to Apple's official website are met with a new splash page wishing Mac a happy birthday. After a short intro, users are directed to the "Mac 30" mini site, essentially an interactive animated timeline crafted to tell the Mac story from its beginning in 1984.

From the first pane of Apple's Mac 30 timeline:

The one that started it all -- the original Macintosh -- wasn't just a computer. It was a declaration that the power of the computer now belonged to everyone. At the time, most people didn't even know how to use one. But thanks to the simple graphical interface of the Macintosh, they didn't have to. It was approachable and friendly, starting with the smiley face that greeted you. There were folders that looked like file folders and a trash can for throwing things away. And with the click of a mouse, you could suddenly do the unimaginable. You could move things around on the screen, change the way they looked, combine words with images and sounds, and create like never before. A new era had begun.


The timeline includes high-resolution photos of legacy Mac hardware, accomplished in the company's current "hero" advertising style. Each page of the timeline marks a year in the life of Mac, with famous users expounding on how the computer enabled them to create great things or break new ground.

Along with milestones marking every year, the pages have a "What people did with it" graphic that shows the spread of Mac users in a variety of fields. In 1984, for example, most Macs were being used by in music creation and photography, while 2013 shows a significant move into the consumer realm with Internet and email taking over professional-minded tasks.

Apple also offers a page where visitors can tell their own Mac story. Users select which machine they started on, where they lived and how they used it. Results are shown in an interactive graph. Currently, the most-selected "first Mac" is the Macintosh 512Ke from 1986. That year also saw the highest use in education and teaching, according to the poll results.

A video was also made especially for the Mac 30 site:



With numerous interviews, beautiful photos and rich data presentation, the level of work Apple put into the mini site is obvious and goes well beyond any promotional effort in recent memory. And rightfully so.

The Macintosh is one of the most important products Apple has created thus far. It brought computing to the masses; empowering both professionals and everyday users to accomplish feats never imaginable before its debut.
post #2 of 78
Did everyone fill out which was their first Mac?
http://www.apple.com/30-years/your-first-mac/

My was the iMac G4 "lamp"
post #3 of 78
Very cool site. Love the attention Apple is giving the Mac. 1smile.gif
post #4 of 78

That was an awesome Mac.

 

My first experience of Mac, which my parents bought as the family computer, was the Performa LC 630.

 

The first Mac I bought for myself was a 12" Powerbook G4.

 

Since then I've bought an iMac G5, two 17" MacBook Pros (the second being the unibody model), a Mac Pro and the latest (and currently only Mac in my possession) a 15" retina MacBook Pro.  Somewhere in there I also took ownership of a 15" iMac G4, which was one of my favourites.

 

Least favourite would have to be the iMac G5, and while the PowerBook G4 was great, its screen was way too dim and poor by today's standards.  If I'd seen the rMBP's screen back then I wouldn't have believed it!

post #5 of 78

My first Mac was a Powerbook Pismo G3 w/dvd. I had the dual batteries for it, which lasted for ages (compared to other laptops at the time), and I loved that machine and thought that it looked great, the keyboard was great and I just liked it in general even though it's probably incredibly weak by today's standards of course. Hell, my iPad beats the hell out of it, in terms of raw power and especially in graphics power. I forget what the max RAM for that machine was, but whatever it was, I had it installed to the max.

 

In 2001 though, the Pismo suited me well, and I used it on many projects. 

post #6 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by ascii View Post

Did everyone fill out which was their first Mac?
http://www.apple.com/30-years/your-first-mac/

My was the iMac G4 "lamp"

I did, and found it confusing to use radio buttons for multi-selection. They should've used check boxes. Still, some will say it is a cool way for data mining ¡
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post #7 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by s.metcalf View Post
 

Since then I've bought an iMac G5, two 17" MacBook Pros (the second being the unibody model), a Mac Pro and the latest (and currently only Mac in my possession) a 15" retina MacBook Pro.  Somewhere in there I also took ownership of a 15" iMac G4, which was one of my favourites.

We have travelled very similar paths, I also am using a 15" Retina MBP at the moment. But truly the iMac is where my heart is and as soon as there is a Retina iMac, I will switch back.

 

My first iMac came with Mac OS X 10.1 and could run OS 9 apps under Classic. My Retina MBP of course has OS X 10.9. After using OS X for so many years I sometimes get bored of it, but whenever I try the competition (Linux or Win) it is just not up to scratch (sorry MS and the open source community) and after a few days it's back to OS X.

post #8 of 78
I kinda hoped they would't do anything like this. First thing Steve Jobs did after his return in 1997 was eliminating the "Mac museum" in the headquarters. Never look back. Moreover, he considered most of their products since 1985 to 1997 total crap (which they obviously were at least in some cases).
post #9 of 78

The Mac Pro was great and served me well for 3 years but overall the rMBP is the best and most enjoyable Mac I've owned.  The combination of gorgeous screen, fast and silent SSD (a big one), extreme sexiness and portability and finally fast USB 3 puts it way out ahead of even my Mac Pro, which had a faster processor and graphics card.

post #10 of 78
I bought a 128 and a printer some three weeks after it was announced . I was living in Oakland working as a civilian engineer for the Navy in Alameda (just out of college) and had been reading rumors of it for months leading up to the announcement. Just decided to get it.

I did have a build it yourself Sinclair prior, a little membrane keyboard thing that plugged into a tv and had basic with a small amount of RAM. But the Mac was quite different.

I had it upgraded to a 512 as soon as it became available, and I found a bag to carry everything and took it to work. We didn't have any computers to work with other than an HP-85 (a great little computer/ I picked up a few on ebay a couple of years ago to have refurbed) and I would let all my brethren in the group use it for presentations and stuff.

Their also was a user group that met saturdays at one of the Apple buildings and I would go to those frequently. Don't remember many details, but saw Andy Herzfield demo a scanner that was a cartridge that you placed in your printer.

It was a great time.

Have had a number of macs and PC's since, but that single computer really did change everything.
post #11 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by level1807 View Post

I kinda hoped they would't do anything like this. First thing Steve Jobs did after his return in 1997 was eliminating the "Mac museum" in the headquarters. Never look back. Moreover, he considered most of their products since 1985 to 1997 total crap (which they obviously were at least in some cases).

 

I see your point.  When Steve came back he definitely needed to make a clean break from the products that almost killed the company.

 

I think now it's long enough ago and Apple are confident and successful enough that they can permit themselves a bit of nostalgia?

post #12 of 78

My first ever computer @ age 15 - 128k Macintosh, purchased - Nov 1984. Since then, the Royal flush;

 

128k Mac -> Mac SE -> PowerMac G3 (blue) -> PowerMac G4 (QuickSilver) -> iMac G5 -> 15" MacbookPro (2009)  -> 15" MacbookPro (2011) -> 15" MacBookPro retina (2012)

 

What I still own (and in working condition):

 

128k Mac + iMac G5 + 15" MacBookPro retina (2012)

 

Do I win???

post #13 of 78
The Commodore Amiga was released in 1985 and was much, much more advanced compared to the Mac. It had pre-emptive multitasking (something that was introduced on MacOS X!), 4096 colors and was a true multi-media computer. Apple was scared shitless when the Amiga was introduced. Their Mac could only do 2 colors and had beep-sounds. The Amiga and its OS kicked ass. The Amiga was much cheaper as well.

I owned the Amiga 500, 1200 and 4000 and these computers to me changed the world. They symbolized the change from fancy calculators to creative multimedia tools. Shame Commodore sucked at marketing and didn't had the marketing brilliance of Steve Jobs.

Guess I'm saying that I personally don't consider Apple to have changed the world with Mac, at all. To me, Apple changed the world with iPod and iPhone.
post #14 of 78

I agree dacloo.  The Amiga was amazing.  Not to mention a games powerhouse beyond its years.  I and most of my friends had one.

 

It was only when Amiga died that I ended up with a Mac.  I think my parents viewed Mac OS as being closer to Amiga OS and therefore easier to transition and adapt.  Plus they had Macs where they worked.  Funny how things work out.


Edited by s.metcalf - 1/24/14 at 3:58am
post #15 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by Macmojo View Post
 

My first ever computer @ age 15 - 128k Macintosh, purchased - Nov 1984. Since then, the Royal flush;

 

128k Mac -> Mac SE -> PowerMac G3 (blue) -> PowerMac G4 (QuickSilver) -> iMac G5 -> 15" MacbookPro (2009)  -> 15" MacbookPro (2011) -> 15" MacBookPro retina (2012)

 

What I still own (and in working condition):

 

128k Mac + iMac G5 + 15" MacBookPro retina (2012)

 

Do I win???

 

So far... :smokey:

post #16 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by dacloo View Post

The Commodore Amiga was released in 1985 and was much, much more advanced compared to the Mac. It had pre-emptive multitasking (something that was introduced on MacOS X!), 4096 colors and was a true multi-media computer. Apple was scared shitless when the Amiga was introduced. Their Mac could only do 2 colors and had beep-sounds. The Amiga and its OS kicked ass. The Amiga was much cheaper as well.

I owned the Amiga 500, 1200 and 4000 and these computers to me changed the world. They symbolized the change from fancy calculators to creative multimedia tools. Shame Commodore sucked at marketing and didn't had the marketing brilliance of Steve Jobs.

Guess I'm saying that I personally don't consider Apple to have changed the world with Mac, at all. To me, Apple changed the world with iPod and iPhone.

Taking an historical view of the home computer, in terms of who did what first and what features survive to the present day, you still have to give the Mac credit for a GUI OS. The preemptive multitasking of Workbench was nice but there was no accompanying memory protection so 1 app could still take down the whole system. 

 

What makes the Amiga stand out from an historical viewpoint (for me) is more it's hardware. It was the first home computer (as far as I know) to come with a dedicated GPU that was more than just a framebuffer. It had the same Motorola 68000 as the Mac, but due to having a whole other processor just for graphics, it left Mac graphics in the dust. Today, it is taken for granted that every computer needs a GPU, even if it is just one built in to the CPU. That is the real legacy of the Amiga.

post #17 of 78

I started with an Apple ][+ in high school, couldn't afford a computer in college, but used many SE's, ci's, cx's, in the lab for classwork (BFA).  Post college, at work I've used quadra 650's and all sorts of PowerMacs.

Still own a Classic II, a G4 Cube, a G5 PowerMac, a i7 iMac, and all sorts of iPods/iPads.

post #18 of 78

My first home computer was a Performa 400 but we started integrating Macs at work in the late 80's, first to compliment then replace our commercial Atex system. 

 

The 30th anniversary movie shows more about Apple, its ad agency and Macs (I'm sure it was created entirely on Macs) than any other computer company could possibly show. Apple provides tools for creative people and this movie really demonstrates that. Microsoft could never produce a video like this about its products and when they've tried, they've used Macs to produce it. Samsung isn't even in the running since their ads never demonstrate the capability of their products, they only try to baffle you with ** (you know how that saying goes).

post #19 of 78
It appears that Apple stores will be getting the Mac love too.. Source: 9to5Mac

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post #20 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by level1807 View Post

I kinda hoped they would't do anything like this. First thing Steve Jobs did after his return in 1997 was eliminating the "Mac museum" in the headquarters. Never look back. Moreover, he considered most of their products since 1985 to 1997 total crap (which they obviously were at least in some cases).

 

He considered them to be total crap because he wasn't there. Don't tell me the SE/30 or the IIci was total crap. The first PowerBooks came out in that period and projected Apple from nowhere to the top notebook seller in a matter of months. There were a few crappy models, the IIvi, IIvx, PowerBook 190, 5300, and much of the performa line.

 

Apple's problem that time was in the decisions the company made, not the engineering of their products.

post #21 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by dacloo View Post

The Commodore Amiga was released in 1985 and was much, much more advanced compared to the Mac. It had pre-emptive multitasking (something that was introduced on MacOS X!), 4096 colors and was a true multi-media computer. Apple was scared shitless when the Amiga was introduced. Their Mac could only do 2 colors and had beep-sounds. The Amiga and its OS kicked ass. The Amiga was much cheaper as well.

I owned the Amiga 500, 1200 and 4000 and these computers to me changed the world. They symbolized the change from fancy calculators to creative multimedia tools. Shame Commodore sucked at marketing and didn't had the marketing brilliance of Steve Jobs.

Guess I'm saying that I personally don't consider Apple to have changed the world with Mac, at all. To me, Apple changed the world with iPod and iPhone.

 

Quite true, but I suspect that Amiga's roots and perception as a gaming machine vs Apple's as a business and personal tool doomed Amiga from the start. Perhaps it was business applications that turned the tide in Apple's favor, but even then, it was the PC that dominated. My own perception at the time is that Amiga was first a gaming machine.

 

I suspect that there are dissertations written about the fall of Commodore, just as there are about the fall and rise of Apple.

post #22 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by ascii View Post

Did everyone fill out which was their first Mac?
http://www.apple.com/30-years/your-first-mac/

My was the iMac G4 "lamp"

Yep I did. A Mac Plus was my first Mac, with the signatures of the creators inside the case. That said, in truth my Lisa came first and Lisa seems to have been forgotten. It was the first draw dropping GUI available to the public and I loved mine.

Of course prior to the Lisa and Macs I had numerous Apple ][ s and Apple /// s. Loved them all to bits. I had Appe ][ s networked with fiber optic cable and shared hard drives. Often people don't realize how far Apple ][s could be pushed. Just don't ask about record locking ... cough cough ... (forgive the funny spacing, I kept invoking strike outs! lol)
Edited by digitalclips - 1/24/14 at 6:21am
From Apple ][ - to new Mac Pro I've used them all.
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Long on AAPL so biased
Google Motto "You're not the customer. You're the product."
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post #23 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by dacloo View Post

The Commodore Amiga was released in 1985 and was much, much more advanced compared to the Mac. It had pre-emptive multitasking (something that was introduced on MacOS X!), 4096 colors and was a true multi-media computer. Apple was scared shitless when the Amiga was introduced. Their Mac could only do 2 colors and had beep-sounds. The Amiga and its OS kicked ass. The Amiga was much cheaper as well.

I owned the Amiga 500, 1200 and 4000 and these computers to me changed the world. They symbolized the change from fancy calculators to creative multimedia tools. Shame Commodore sucked at marketing and didn't had the marketing brilliance of Steve Jobs.

Guess I'm saying that I personally don't consider Apple to have changed the world with Mac, at all. To me, Apple changed the world with iPod and iPhone.

 

I had the Amiga 500, 1000, 2000, 3000 and an Emplant board with Mac ROMs.  I had a Mac Iifx at work and I could get by coding at home on the Emplant.  I also did some very rudimentary 3D (lightwave) and video work on the Amiga side (I bought a used Toaster at one point).

 

However, Steve did change the world with the Mac.  The Amiga, for all it's strengths, never had the same usability and software support as the Mac.  I could do things on the Mac I could never do on the Amiga.  It wasn't just marketing but a real focus on the user.  "The computer for the rest of us" wasn't just a slogan but an actual design goal.

 

One that Apple was ruthlessly driven toward by Jobs and not really achieved until the iPad.

post #24 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by nht View Post

I had the Amiga 500, 1000, 2000, 3000 and an Emplant board with Mac ROMs.  I had a Mac Iifx at work and I could get by coding at home on the Emplant.  I also did some very rudimentary 3D (lightwave) and video work on the Amiga side (I bought a used Toaster at one point).

However, Steve did change the world with the Mac.  The Amiga, for all it's strengths, never had the same usability and software support as the Mac.  I could do things on the Mac I could never do on the Amiga.  It wasn't just marketing but a real focus on the user.  "The computer for the rest of us" wasn't just a slogan but an actual design goal.

One that Apple was ruthlessly driven toward by Jobs and not really achieved until the iPad.

My IMac Ifx is sitting here next to me. It stopped working so I am swapping out the two on board batteries and will try over the weekend to get her going again. 1smile.gif
From Apple ][ - to new Mac Pro I've used them all.
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From Apple ][ - to new Mac Pro I've used them all.
Long on AAPL so biased
Google Motto "You're not the customer. You're the product."
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post #25 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post

My IMac Ifx is sitting here next to me. It stopped working so I am swapping out the two on board batteries and will try over the weekend to get her going again. 1smile.gif

 

Great machine.  I had all sorts of insanely expensive cards in mine including a huge assed ram disk card (probably a whole 512K or something stupidly small by todays standards).  I had a Vax 8500 processing data to send to my Mac so I could turn the data into useful color images.  NCSA had released some HDF and plotting/visualization tools for the Mac that were extremely capable. 

 

I guess I could probably have done the same thing on a SGI but we didn't have but a few of those around.

post #26 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by nht View Post
 

However, Steve did change the world with the Mac.  The Amiga, for all it's strengths, never had the same usability and software support as the Mac.  I could do things on the Mac I could never do on the Amiga.

 

This is exactly what I was going to say.  While the Amiga had great games (Dungeon Master!) and artistic software, it's overall usability and usefulness in a wide variety of areas was lacking relative to the Macintosh.  It was definitely the gamer's machine of choice for that era, but never really broke outside of that market.

 

Oh, and the first Mac I owned was the 1st gen TiBook (though I had used plenty of others before that).  At the point where I could afford to buy my own computer (mid 90s), Macs didn't have as much appeal.  OS X changed that.


Edited by auxio - 1/24/14 at 7:04am
 
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post #27 of 78
Lisa > MacXL
128
512
II
SE30
PB1400
iBook
iBookG4
MacBook
post #28 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by level1807 View Post

I kinda hoped they would't do anything like this. First thing Steve Jobs did after his return in 1997 was eliminating the "Mac museum" in the headquarters. Never look back. Moreover, he considered most of their products since 1985 to 1997 total crap (which they obviously were at least in some cases).

That's all fine and dandy, but Steve jobs is dead so his opinion about the products he wasn't directly a part of is moot.

Tim Cook is running Apple now and he is proud of the company history and feels the desire to share that pride. If Steve jobs doesn't like it, he can get stuffed

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A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

(She's family so I'm a little biased)

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post #29 of 78
My first was a Mac 512. It got me and a number of my friends through college--I had a walk-in closet, and I would put the Mac in there so they could work through the night without keeping me up.
post #30 of 78

I couldn't help but notice there seemed to be a few facts that got mixed up on their website.

The PowerMac 8500 wasn't the first Mac with A/V capabilities. That would have been the Quadra 840av.

 

And the Macintosh TV wasn't the only black Apple desktop before the nMP, unless you absolutely want to define the blackish appearance of the 20th anniversary Mac as "not black". I guess technically, this is true, but everybody I know always considered that black.

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post #31 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by G-News View Post

I couldn't help but notice there seemed to be a few facts that got mixed up on their website.
The PowerMac 8500 wasn't the first Mac with A/V capabilities. That would have been the Quadra 840av.

And the Macintosh TV wasn't the only black Apple desktop before the nMP, unless you absolutely want to define the blackish appearance of the 20th anniversary Mac as "not black". I guess technically, this is true, but everybody I know always considered that black.

"Swift generally gets you to the right way much quicker." - auxio -

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post #32 of 78
Q
Originally Posted by ascii View Post
 

Taking an historical view of the home computer, in terms of who did what first and what features survive to the present day, you still have to give the Mac credit for a GUI OS. The preemptive multitasking of Workbench was nice but there was no accompanying memory protection so 1 app could still take down the whole system. 

 

Yes, Apple had the GUI sooner; Commodore released their Amiga almost 2 years later. Steve was smart enough to 'lend' its GUI from Xerox Labs, and managed to make it more user friendly.

 

Memory protection wasn't available on Amiga and it indeed sucked. However, classic MacOS didn't have memory protection as well. In fact, MacOS 1 to 4 didn't even had the ability of running multiple apps at the same time.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ascii View Post

What makes the Amiga stand out from an historical viewpoint (for me) is more it's hardware. It was the first home computer (as far as I know) to come with a dedicated GPU that was more than just a framebuffer. It had the same Motorola 68000 as the Mac, but due to having a whole other processor just for graphics, it left Mac graphics in the dust. Today, it is taken for granted that every computer needs a GPU, even if it is just one built in to the CPU. That is the real legacy of the Amiga.

 

I agree from a general point of view. To me personally, both the software and hardware were the legacy. But, I'm subjective having used it for so long. Especially Workbench, Deluxe Paint IV, OctaMED, AMOS Pro and the many high-end games that ran on the Amiga.

post #33 of 78

That timeline is jacked. It leaves out two of my favorite Macs, The Macintosh II fx and the original Mac Pro.

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post #34 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by s.metcalf View Post
 

I agree dacloo.  The Amiga was amazing.  Not to mention a games powerhouse beyond its years.  I and most of my friends had one.

 

It was only when Amiga died that I ended up with a Mac.  I think my parents viewed Mac OS as being closer to Amiga OS and therefore easier to transition and adapt.  Plus they had Macs where they worked.  Funny how things work out.


If I remember correctly, the root cause of the demise of the Amiga was that it used a non IBM PC hardware architecture. The problem was that the rest of the IBM PC industry continued using the standard architecture and wrote graphic software that communicated with the graphics hardware directly. Thus, one could buy any IBM PC compatible machine and run (play) software on it from numerous vendors. (That is, bypass the DOS graphics API by talking directly to the video hardware. --Real Mode anybody?)

post #35 of 78
My first experience with a Mac was in November 1983. I owned a computer store less than a mile from Apple HQ. Apple asked if they could film a promotional video in our store.

Long story short. They took over the store, papered over the windows & doors, kept customers out...

They had 2 Macs and loads of Apple people, actors, techies.

After it was done, Bill Atkinson gave me a personal demo and then I had about 15 minutes of hands-on time:


Here's the ad -- result of about 18 hours of activity;


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J6HGh6wC37U
"Swift generally gets you to the right way much quicker." - auxio -

"The perfect [birth]day -- A little playtime, a good poop, and a long nap." - Tomato Greeting Cards -
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post #36 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by Apple ][ View Post
 

My first Mac was a Powerbook Pismo G3 w/dvd. I had the dual batteries for it, which lasted for ages (compared to other laptops at the time), and I loved that machine and thought that it looked great, the keyboard was great and I just liked it in general even though it's probably incredibly weak by today's standards of course. Hell, my iPad beats the hell out of it, in terms of raw power and especially in graphics power. I forget what the max RAM for that machine was, but whatever it was, I had it installed to the max.

 

In 2001 though, the Pismo suited me well, and I used it on many projects. 

You're going to have to change your handle to Apple Prismo then ;)

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“What would I do? I’d shut Apple down and give the money back to the shareholders”

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post #37 of 78

Here it all started with a 128K Mac in September 1984. Then on to the MacPlus, Mac II, Mac Iici (Home), Mac Iici (Office), added several Daystar Accelerators over the years and my Iici from home was retired in September 2005 with an iMac 20" PowerPC based, added iMac 27" with Intel i7 in June 2010 and finally MacBookPro 13" in October 2010.  Getting itchy again soon.

27" iMac, i7 2.8G CPU, 16 GB, 2TB Hd, Radeon HD 4850,  MacBookPro 13",  iPad2 64Gb, 2 x  iPhone4S 32Gb, 1 x 64Gb iPhone5S, 1Tb TimeCap,  2 x Apple TV.   Got my AAPL when they were $12.50 each.
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27" iMac, i7 2.8G CPU, 16 GB, 2TB Hd, Radeon HD 4850,  MacBookPro 13",  iPad2 64Gb, 2 x  iPhone4S 32Gb, 1 x 64Gb iPhone5S, 1Tb TimeCap,  2 x Apple TV.   Got my AAPL when they were $12.50 each.
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post #38 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by dacloo View Post
 

 

 Steve was smart enough to 'lend' its GUI from Xerox Labs, and managed to make it more user friendly.

 

This is misleading, Jef Raskin was the father of the Macintosh, and GUI concepts predated Xerox.  Apple built a new product with a different purpose from Xerox using some of these same concepts and inventing others.  link

post #39 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by level1807 View Post

I kinda hoped they would't do anything like this. First thing Steve Jobs did after his return in 1997 was eliminating the "Mac museum" in the headquarters. Never look back. Moreover, he considered most of their products since 1985 to 1997 total crap (which they obviously were at least in some cases).

 

When we want to look at Apple's latest decisions through the lens of Steve Jobs, we should remember that there was still context in his decisions.

 

I think the circumstances are different now. Apple was near death before Steve Jobs returned so it made sense to get rid of the "Mac museum". Now that the company has revived and the Mac in no longer the hub of the Apple universe, Apple is reminding users that great things happened (and still happen) on a Mac. 

 

Considering taking out my Mac 512k enhanced out of its box for an awkward family photo.

post #40 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by dav View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by dacloo View Post

 

 Steve was smart enough to 'lend' its GUI from Xerox Labs, and managed to make it more user friendly.

This is misleading, Jef Raskin was the father of the Macintosh, and GUI concepts predated Xerox.  Apple built a new product with a different purpose from Xerox using some of these same concepts and inventing others.  link


If nothing else, the Mac popularized the use of Torx screws
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"Swift generally gets you to the right way much quicker." - auxio -

"The perfect [birth]day -- A little playtime, a good poop, and a long nap." - Tomato Greeting Cards -
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