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Apple's Macintosh has forced the world to change for 30 years

post #1 of 78
Thread Starter 
Thirty years ago today, Steve Jobs presented the new Macintosh personal computer to a room of Apple investors. The machine has maintained its impact upon the world ever since, despite continually morphing into new forms while detractors voiced their disapproval.

iMac


A legendary launch



While met with excited applause from Apple's shareholders, the new Macintosh in 1984 nearly flopped. It was premium priced and arrived without a huge library of software capable of taking advantage of its unique features. Additionally, the radical rethinking of personal computing that the Macintosh introduced made it difficult for many existing software developers to enthusiastically embrace the new platform.



Apple's Macintosh also initially refused to emulate existing DOS or Apple II software, a conscious decision made by Apple to force developers to create truly new programs for it, rather than just simple ports of their existing, non-graphical software. Among Apple's critics, this was simply an arrogant failure to respect the status quo.

The arrival of the Macintosh wasn't a surprise; it was actually two years behind its originally expected ship date. Apple had hoped to ship the Macintosh by 1982. The tech world had already gotten a taste of the graphical desktop from Apple's Lisa computer, but Macintosh was expected to deliver similar sophistication at a more affordable price.

Critics familiar with the status quo hated the Macintosh and its new mouse, even if it was obvious to anyone exposed to the radical new ideas conceived within Xerox's Palo Alto Research Center that graphical computing and physical motion gestures articulated with a handheld "mouse" device were going to be the future interface of the personal computer.



With the Macintosh, Apple not only needed to manage all of the business operations required to sell personal computing systems, but also needed to convince the general public why they should pay a premium to gain access to the next generation of technology, rather than being content to buy more affordable, but less sophisticated and more poorly integrated commodity products.

Software Sells Systems



Steve Jobs, who had taken over Apple's Macintosh team and pushed its developers to create an "insanely great" machine that ambitiously pushed the technology envelope, was not only micromanaging the new computer but also seeking to evangelize the development of custom, third party Mac software to ensure that new buyers could find enough native content to confidently leap to the new platform.

Wars


One of the first software companies to work closely with Apple to develop new Mac titles was Microsoft. Despite having established itself in an uncontested Robber Baron role as IBM's licensor of MS-DOS, Microsoft was struggling to sell productivity software for IBM's DOS PC, a market where Lotus 1-2-3 and Word Perfect proved to be difficult competitors.

Both Lotus and WordPerfect failed to deliver ports their PC software for the launch of Apple's Macintosh, giving Microsoft little competition for its Bravo-based word processor developed at Xerox PARC and rebranded as "Word," or the company's clone of VisiCalc rebranded as "Excel."

Office


Microsoft enjoyed such a close association with Apple on the development of the Macintosh that it enabled the software company to copy Apple's Macintosh's novel desktop with a rough approximation product for DOS PCs it named Windows 1.0.

Microsoft had promised not to steal Apple's technology and port it to IBM's PC before the release of the Mac, but that promise was contractually tied to the Mac's original ship date. Because the Mac shipped later than expected, Microsoft could technically claim that it wasn't breaking its contract when it demonstrated Windows 1.0 for DOS in 1983.

It would ultimately take Microsoft another ten years before its Windows product evolved into version deemed a worthy competitor to the Mac by the computer buying market. That arrival was also supported by a lucky, arbitrary court decision that granted Microsoft unfettered access to appropriate virtually all of Apple's technology without paying for any of it.

Macintosh's decade of decline and the NeXT step



After a slow start, Apple's Macintosh fortunes began to turn around after users discovered a valuable, unique application of the new machine: desktop publishing. After making a nearly lethal deal with Microsoft related to productivity software, Jobs coordinated the development of the laser printer, Adobe's new PostScript page description language also originating at Xerox PARC, and desktop publishing software that tied the two together (and to the Macintosh) from Aldus.

Before Jobs could see the full impact of the new desktop publishing industry building around the Macintosh, he was pushed to leave Apple in 1986 to develop what he felt was the next obvious leap in computing. Jobs' new company, NeXT Computer, used Adobe's PostScript as its native display language and built a sophisticated framework of development tools designed to ease the creation of Mac-like (or better than Mac-like) apps.

NeXT


NeXT was also based on a foundation compatible with AT&T's UNIX, but rewritten at the University of California, Berkeley. The Macintosh had been written from scratch in low level code that lacked the technical computing sophistication available on higher powered (and more expensive) workstations running a "real" operating system.

NeXT had trouble escaping Apple's atmosphere, running into lawsuits that limited the company to a niche audience. Back at Apple, the Macintosh languished with its weak operating system and limited development tools. Despite a series of efforts to pair its Macintosh user interface with Unix or Unix-like operating systems, Apple rapidly fell into irrelevance as Microsoft began to define the state of the art in personal computing.

MAE


Mac + NeXT = OS X



By 1996, Apple was rapidly losing money in addition to being eclipsed by Microsoft Windows. In the very last days of the year, the company decided to acquire Jobs' NeXT and use its technology as the basis for a new platform that promised to push the Macintosh environment ahead into the future: OS X. Critics complained that the status quo of Windows didn't need any competition, nor could ever successively be competed against.

Back at Apple after the NeXT acquisition, Jobs reinvented the company, refocused upon creating exceptional, highly integrated computing machines rather than the commodity PC-like products that pundits had always insisted Apple build.

Ive


The new Apple launched a series of novel consumer products starting with iMac. The company also presciently invested in mobile computing and mobile devices, creating a development legacy and market position that positioned it to jump upon the emerging smartphone market in its infancy.

OS X begets iOS



While everyone else in the smartphone business was fixated upon using low powered, button-oriented hardware, Apple leapt ahead of the market by scaling down the Mac's OS X, running it upon mobile hardware with unprecedented levels of computing power and storage capacity.

Buttons


Patented


Critics didn't approve of this strategy, insisting even to this day that Apple should really be focused on pumping out cheap, low end hardware, apparently oblivious to the fact that Apple has been inhaling the majority of the mobile hardware industry's profits ever since the iPhone appeared seven years ago.

Eventually dubbed iOS, the iPhone's new mobile firmware delivered the same sophisticated operating system and easy to use development tools Apple had used to win back Windows users to its Mac computers over the 2000s. This maintained Apple's overall product strategy as being consistent since the advent of the Macintosh, enhanced with the re-injection of Jobs' influence at the acquisition of NeXT.

By 2010, Apple had established its new iPhone as an even larger and more important platform than its Mac notebooks and desktop systems. That same year, the company launched iPad as an easy to use, general computing device that delivered much of the power of a general purpose PC but without the security issues or baffling complexity.

Almost immediately, the new iPad eclipsed Apple's Mac sales, appealing to a much larger audience just as the iPhone had before it in the specialized role of a smartphone. However, the iPhone and iPad both owed their success to the legacy of OS X, which in turn built upon both the Macintosh philosophy and NeXT technology.

Maps


Future of the Mac



At the same time, Apple continues to enhance and develop Mac products, informed by the pace of parallel iOS development. Apple recently released its Mac Pro, a product that not only literally thinks outside the box, but also revamps the basic architecture of the generic PC to better leverage the computing power of very powerful chips designed to accelerate graphics operations.



Apple's approach to advancing the very architecture of desktop computing by focusing on GPUs was a move presaged in its development of Open CL and a decade of work creating a user interface centered on a compositing graphics engine. Apple beat Microsoft to advance graphics on the desktop by 6 years, and Google's Android similarly failed to catch up with iOS for nearly half a decade.

Critics accuse Apple of "falling to innovate," but consistently fail to recognize important innovations that went on to disrupt the status quo and materially shift the industry, technology and even society in ways that are not exactly impossible to predict. For example, none of Apple's critics even seem to understand how important the company's GPU-centric strategy has been to Apple's success with OS X and iOS over the past decade.

Apple has also continued to advance its mobile computing prowess by eschewing ostensibly core elements of the PC to deliver systems that are comparatively smarter and more capable. Macs have take cues from iOS devices, increasingly working to shed moving parts such as magnetic disc and optical drives for solid state memory in an effort to boost battery life. Detractors question why Apple is removing any hardware they are familiar with, again failing to understand what innovation really means.

Apple has already signaled that it plans to focus on automotive computing with its "iOS in the Car" initiative. The company is also likely to enter the home automation market, potentially turning the home computer into a computing home.



Never before has Apple had more capital to invest, more technology to develop, more customers to service, more developers to influence or more brand capital to leverage in building the next great leap in computing. Apple's next ten years of developing the Mac philosophy with NeXT technology should be more exciting than its last 30.

The only thing we know for certain about Apple's future is that there will be plenty of critics upset about every change the company introduces, at least until those shifts are eventually adopted by the rest of the industry.
post #2 of 78

I also wonder ... what is the face of the Mac now? It most likely is not the Mac Pro. Sales figures suggest it is the MacBook. But the iMac, to me, defines the past and future of the Mac.

post #3 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Apple's Macintosh has forced the world to change for 30 years
In the defence of MS & Android, the same could be said for them.

Thanks DED, another great article.
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post #4 of 78
It's good to see one of these wide view/history of technology/future trends articles again on this site. They really are a strength of the author. The recent spate of hardware reviews have been ok, but to do those thoroughly you basically need to be one of these guys who can look at an x-ray of a CPU and know what each trace does (witness Anandtech's hardware reviews). But no other site can do these kind of articles like AppleInsider can. They are a good read and extremely well informed to boot.
post #5 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by StruckPaper View Post
 

I also wonder ... what is the face of the Mac now? It most likely is not the Mac Pro. Sales figures suggest it is the MacBook. But the iMac, to me, defines the past and future of the Mac.

 

I agree regrading the iMac. But the MacBook Air is as well the future of the Mac. It has changed notebooks and is still an unbelievably great device.

post #6 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post


In the defence of MS & Android, the same could be said for them.

Thanks DED, another great article.

Oh sure, but without Apple to copy from and without Apple's empowerment of people to use computers more productively and with relative ease, that "change" might well have been quite a bit more "Orwellian"--and especially without Apple fighting those parasitic forces tooth and nail all the way. Look at the "mighty" MS and the fragmented Android today! The fight is far from over, pal.

Daniel Swanson

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post #7 of 78

Pretty sure the world at large is apathetic towards the Mac, great as it may be.  Hyperbolic headline.

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post #8 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crowley View Post

Pretty sure the world at large is apathetic towards the Mac, great as it may be.  Hyperbolic headline.
Pretty sure you're wrong. Jaded pessimistic commenter.

Daniel Swanson

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Daniel Swanson

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post #9 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crowley View Post
 

Pretty sure the world at large is apathetic towards the Mac, great as it may be.  Hyperbolic headline.

That may be true of the world at large, but in the rich world, where nearly everyone has to use a computer for one reason or another, people care very much whether their computer is easy to use or hard.

post #10 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by DanielSW View Post

Oh sure, but without Apple to copy from and without Apple's empowerment of people to use computers more productively and with relative ease, that "change" might well have been quite a bit more "Orwellian"

Agree. Was simply my lame attempt at humour.
Quote:
Originally Posted by DanielSW View Post

Pretty sure you're wrong. Jaded pessimistic commenter.

He should take his signature to heart.
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post #11 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crowley View Post
Pretty sure the world at large is apathetic towards the Mac, great as it may be.  Hyperbolic headline.

 

Apathetic or not, it certainly has forced change.

 

  • Before the Macintosh most PC users were using Command Line Interfaces, after its launch to now, most people using the Graphic User Interface.
  • Microsoft Word and Excel were originally created for the Macintosh; Lotus 1-2-3 and WordPerfect were already well entrenched on the IBM PC.  Macintosh inspired Bill Gates and Microsoft to create Windows.  No Macintosh, no Office, No Windows, maybe even no Microsoft?
  • Macintosh together with Pagemaker and the laserwriter printer helped to drive the concept of Desktop Publishing, revolutionising the media print industry.
  • The Macintosh, Quicktime, Final Cut Pro etc have helped to really drive multimedia on computers, doing for photos and video what Pagemaker did for the print industry.  Now editing videos and photos on the computer are as easy as editing words or pages.
  • Only one or two PCs used USB before Apple introduced the iMac.  Now USB ports are ubiquitous on PCs.
  • Apple introduced the Macbook Air to howls of derision from some in the PC industry.  Now Intel has modelled the Ultrabook specification on the Macbook Air concept and every man, his mother and their dog are falling over each other to imitating the Macbook Air and other Apple laptops.

 

Yes, the Macintosh has definitely forced change in the world.

post #12 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crowley View Post
 

Pretty sure the world at large is apathetic towards the Mac, great as it may be.  Hyperbolic headline.

There will always be those in constant denial over the impact Apple has and will continue to have in this world. People will always be apathetic towards all sorts of things mainly because there are lots of bored people, however, Apple is a highly recognized world-wide brand name so a large majority of people know who they are. They might not like their products but that's their choice. 

 

As for the title being hyperbolic, that couldn't be further from the truth. ChiA's comments were spot on (isn't that how it's said in the UK?). :-)

 

disclaimer: my first home computer was a Performa 400, my first work computer was an AKI Ultrabank (find that one!)

post #13 of 78
Great article - and spot on!
post #14 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crowley View Post

Pretty sure the world at large is apathetic towards the Mac, great as it may be.  Hyperbolic headline.

Just talking about the hardware for a moment. Over the years if you look at what a PC laptop looks like a few months after any new MacBook I think you would have found the manufacturers copied Apple's design as closely as they could. I have to double take when looking at the very occasional PC Laptop I see at an airport these days (amongst the sea of glowing white Apple logos) as the design of every PC Laptop is almost identical to a MBP.

I guess the question is, were the crapware makers' customers desirous of a Mac, driving the need for the copying ... or were these manufacturers just assuming their customers were? Either way I'd say your claim of apathy, in design at least, is misguided since clearly PC laptops change all the time to look as much like a Mac as they can.
Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
nMac Pro 6 Core, MacBookPro i7, MacBookPro i5, iPhones 5 and 5s, iPad Air, 2013 Mac mini, SE30, IIFx, Towers; G4 & G3.
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Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
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post #15 of 78

I think the new Mac Pro will in part be a proving ground for Apple's new approach to distributed computing as uniquely supported by the OS. Even with the iMac's different form factor, it also has fan-aided convective "chimney" cooling, and it probably has room for beefier GPUs in the future.Though Apple's tradition of close and in-house integration of hardware/software has long been scoffed at by the competition, it's proving more and more to be an effective end run and a key factor in Apple's success, to say nothing of its profitability and viability.

 

The synergy of iOS+OSX is undeniable, so much so that when the media spouts is negative propaganda at the behest of the puppet masters pulling its strings, it is merely exposed more blatantly as the pitiful mere mouthpiece it's always been.

 

The saner, productive members of the society who have the means to invest can easily see the difference and happily pay the "Apple tax" in order to reap the benefits of the Apple ecosystem which is thriving better than ever under Tim Cook's watch.

 

Apple's future is bright indeed.

Daniel Swanson

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post #16 of 78

my post got deleted without any reason. I told to me Apple changed the world since iPod and iPhone, not the Mac. Why, because the Amiga to me was the real game changer. Actually, Apple was "scared shitless" when it was released (quote).

 

If my post was deleted because of the above, then AppleInsider has a reality distortion field when it comes to having different opinions/experiences. 

post #17 of 78
Nice, DED. You are the one to tell this story. Thanks!

"While met with excited applause from Apple's shareholders, the new Macintosh in 1984 nearly flopped. It was premium priced and arrived without a huge library of software capable of taking advantage of its unique features."

That's a fascinating recollection and worth reflection. When the iPhone was introduced, Apple (and here I want to say Steve Jobs) rhymed its history (Twain). The price was too high and there was no huge library of software. And this happened, even tho' Apple saw that it needed a river of content, tunes, to launch the iPod. I see it as a measure of how new and unknown a space the iPhone created. Nor was software understood to be content.

Both issues, price and software, were settled within the first year. The new twist? Apple settled the software issue, not by relying on a couple partners, Microsoft and Adobe (With friends like this who needs enemies?) but by unleashing the creativity of ten of thousands of developers by deploying the App Store. Today apps are simply another form of digital content like tunes, shows, and books. And apps may even subsume the other forms.
Edited by Stef - 1/24/14 at 9:00am
post #18 of 78
"those shifts are eventually adopted by the rest of the industry." is the final conclusion of everything Apple developed, produces, introduced. When I thought about my first Mac, it was the first Intel Mac, after having a great experience with music using the iPod, my world of tech changed radically. Today, everithing is easy to use, well connected, iCloud based, innovative, nice to work with and phenomenal designed.

I do not understand, why people choose such crap as delivered by ... wait. No bashing ;-)

Hey Apple, congratulations. Well done!
post #19 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Thirty years ago today, Steve Jobs presented the new Macintosh personal computer to a room of Apple investors. The machine has maintained its impact upon the world ever since, despite continually morphing into new forms while detractors voiced their disapproval.

Just for historical accuracy...

The Mac was introduced at Flint Center for the Performing Arts on the Campus of De Anza college -- a few blocks from Apple headquarters.

The Flint Theater seats over 2,000 people in its balcony, mezzanine and orchestra sections.

The crowd was dominated by press, computer enthusiasts, computer dealers, Apple employees... it was not "a room of Apple investors" -- I was there!


Happy 30th Mac & happy 18th to my granddaughter!


Edited by Dick Applebaum - 1/24/14 at 7:38am
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post #20 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post

In the defence of MS & Android, the same could be said for them.

Thanks DED, another great article.
Um-m-m-m, no. You cannot give the same credit to the copy that is given to the original. Android is a crib of iOS. Windows was a floundering failure until Microsoft gained access to Apple code for the Macintosh.
post #21 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post


Just talking about the hardware for a moment. Over the years if you look at what a PC laptop looks like a few months after any new MacBook I think you would have found the manufacturers copied Apple's design as closely as they could. I have to double take when looking at the very occasional PC Laptop I see at an airport these days (amongst the sea of glowing white Apple logos) as the design of every PC Laptop is almost identical to a MBP.

I guess the question is, were the crapware makers' customers desirous of a Mac, driving the need for the copying ... or were these manufacturers just assuming their customers were? Either way I'd say your claim of apathy, in design at least, is misguided since clearly PC laptops change all the time to look as much like a Mac as they can.

 

I wouldn't dispute much of that (though as always, saying that change has a single source is normally betraying a bias).

 

But "the world" does not equal the PC hardware industry, and Apple being influential and widely copied does not equal them "forcing" anything. 

 

I'm not knocking Apple, they're great, and clearly a very important player in computing and technology.  But they didn't "force" the "world" to "change".  It's an OTT headline.

 

When Steve Jobs got on stage for the iPhone did he say that the Mac had changed the world?  No, check the transcript, he said it changed the computer industry.

 

"Apple's Macintosh, a leader in the computer industry for 30 years" - much more acceptable and a realistic headline that still does good service to Apple.

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post #22 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by dacloo View Post
 

my post got deleted without any reason. I told to me Apple changed the world since iPod and iPhone, not the Mac. Why, because the Amiga to me was the real game changer. Actually, Apple was "scared shitless" when it was released (quote).

 

If my post was deleted because of the above, then AppleInsider has a reality distortion field when it comes to having different opinions/experiences. 

 

Or you simply could go back to the thread you actually posted in...and no, Apple was not scared shitless of the Amiga. 

 

http://forums.appleinsider.com/t/161737/apple-celebrates-30-years-of-mac-with-special-webpage-video#post_2462218

post #23 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crowley View Post
 

I wouldn't dispute much of that (though as always, saying that change has a single source is normally betraying a bias).

 

But "the world" does not equal the PC hardware industry, and Apple being influential and widely copied does not equal them "forcing" anything. 

 

I'm not knocking Apple, they're great, and clearly a very important player in computing and technology.  But they didn't "force" the "world" to "change".  It's an OTT headline.

 

It's a DED headline, what do you expect?  That said, by changing the computer industry Apple did change the world given how important personal computers are to modern world. 

post #24 of 78

A quibble with your use of language.

 

The Macintosh and Apple have not FORCED change on the world.  They have enticed the world to change.

 

 
post #25 of 78
The really important thing to remember about Steve Jobs and Apple is the strategic importance of destroying your own best products. The secret that Apple carries is this willingness. The number of innovative products that Apple has made obsolete is the real legacy of the company. Some people may buy Apple computers, but they are nothing more than an important hobby for this company. The Mac is a legacy that Apple is willing to let go of in search of how to make a better product. Microsoft has never been willing to make a product that could kill Excel, Word or Windows. Apple has killed the vast majority of it's products and continues to do so. That is the legacy that Steve Jobs brought back to Apple It lives on in the company, and it gives Apple it's secret advantage over the other giants of the tech sector.
post #26 of 78
Originally Posted by Macnewsjunkie View Post
Some people may buy Apple computers, but they are nothing more than an important hobby for this company. The Mac is a legacy that Apple is willing to let go of in search of how to make a better product.

 

But that’s the opposite of what Cook and company just said.

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

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Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

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post #27 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by nht View Post
 

 

Or you simply could go back to the thread you actually posted in...and no, Apple was not scared shitless of the Amiga. 

 

http://forums.appleinsider.com/t/161737/apple-celebrates-30-years-of-mac-with-special-webpage-video#post_2462218

 

Maybe not "shitless", but close:


Jean-Louis Gassee, formerly of Apple Computer, was quoted as saying "When the Amiga came out, everyone [at Apple] was scared as hell." (Amazing Computing, Nov. 1996) 

na na na na na...
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post #28 of 78
OSX is built on top of the BSD layer running on Mach. Mach is from Carnegie Mellon. Just giving Easterners credit where credit is due.
post #29 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by nht View Post

Or you simply could go back to the thread you actually posted in...and no, Apple was not scared shitless of the Amiga. 

http://forums.appleinsider.com/t/161737/apple-celebrates-30-years-of-mac-with-special-webpage-video#post_2462218

LOL. The delusion of censoring "people with different opinions" are a VERY common reality-distorting meme in these forums. I don't get these persecution fantasies these people tell themselves. Hilarious. If they behaved IRL the way they do in the forums, they would see a happy Apple user, go up to them, and start bragging unsolicited about how much better their {insert-other-brand-here} is, and how insecure it makes them to see people liking their Apple products. Then if they get dirty looks, they'll whine about censorship.

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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post #30 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Me View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post

In the defence of MS & Android, the same could be said for them.

Thanks DED, another great article.
Um-m-m-m, no. You cannot give the same credit to the copy that is given to the original. Android is a crib of iOS. Windows was a floundering failure until Microsoft gained access to Apple code for the Macintosh.

I agree. Was simply my lame attempt at humour.
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post #31 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by hiwreck View Post

OSX is built on top of the BSD layer running on Mach. Mach is from Carnegie Mellon. Just giving Easterners credit where credit is due.

Good to know.

And where did OSX come from?
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post #32 of 78

I remember when my bro-in-law was looking for a new computer round the time the iMac, second gen came out. I told him he could do no wrong if he got a beige one.

He did. Took him twenty-five years to add some colour to his life.

When I find time to rewrite the laws of Physics, there'll Finally be some changes made round here!

I am not crazy! Three out of five court appointed psychiatrists said so.

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When I find time to rewrite the laws of Physics, there'll Finally be some changes made round here!

I am not crazy! Three out of five court appointed psychiatrists said so.

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post #33 of 78
Love your editorial pieces, they're always instant classics!
post #34 of 78
Anyone know for certain why Apple themselves pretty well skipped the 25 year anniversary? Maybe it was just emphasizing out with the old and in with the new, that being iOS iDevices?

http://appleinsider.com/articles/09/01/24/apple_thriving_on_25th_anniversary_of_the_mac
melior diabolus quem scies
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post #35 of 78

Apple Mac. The revolution. The rest is history
http://www.mackido.com/History/index.html


It all started at the Department of Defense (Defense Department, USDOD, DOD, DoD or the Pentagon), from where Xerox took ideas, from where Apple took idead to make the real practical revolution: the Mac.

post #36 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppeX View Post
 

Apple Mac. The revolution. The rest is history
http://www.mackido.com/History/index.html


It all started at the Department of Defense (Defense Department, USDOD, DOD, DoD or the Pentagon), from where Xerox took ideas, from where Apple took idead to make the real practical revolution: the Mac.

 

??? Black is white! Night is day! Do you have any f***ing idea what you are talking about?

post #37 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by island hermit View Post
 

 

Maybe not "shitless", but close:


Jean-Louis Gassee, formerly of Apple Computer, was quoted as saying "When the Amiga came out, everyone [at Apple] was scared as hell." (Amazing Computing, Nov. 1996)

 

Yes, because Amiga was a WAY better machine. Unfortunately, it fell into the incompetent hands of Commodore.

post #38 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Me View Post


Um-m-m-m, no. You cannot give the same credit to the copy that is given to the original. Android is a crib of iOS. Windows was a floundering failure until Microsoft gained access to Apple code for the Macintosh.

 

How exactly did Microsoft gain access to Apple code? What ARE you talking about?

post #39 of 78
Originally Posted by marubeni View Post

How exactly did Microsoft gain access to Apple code?

 

By striking the deal with Apple to write versions of their productivity software for the platform.

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

Reply

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

Reply
post #40 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post
Just for historical accuracy...

The Mac was introduced at Flint Center for the Performing Arts on the Campus of De Anza college -- a few blocks from Apple headquarters.

The Flint Theater seats over 2,000 people in its balcony, mezzanine and orchestra sections.

The crowd was dominated by press, computer enthusiasts, computer dealers, Apple employees... it was not "a room of Apple investors" -- I was there!
 

So was I (near the back, right side main floor), invited as an Apple employee. When I got home that night, my family smiled indulgently, expecting I'd calm down in a bit. (Except for the boy, who was a bit young to care.) Heh. They're still Mac users today.

 

Pretty much all I did as far as helping the Mac effort, being in the Apple// division then, was help to develop and sell products whose income kept the doors open until the Mac finally took off. They only serve, etc.

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