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post #121 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by EricTheHalfBee View Post


You mean like Android users claiming the notification centre was ripped off Android or the Atrix had a fingerprint sensor first? Or Control Centre?
 

The argument over which party "invented" the fingerprint sensor is pretty silly. The idea of fingerprint based unlocking for electronic devices is nothing new and has been on laptops for years. Motorola's implementation of fingerprint-based unlocking on the Atrix was similar in concept to what Apple has done on the 5s. Both implementations place the sensor on the primary button used to wake up the device, which in Android's case is the power button, not the home button. The main difference is that 5s uses a sensor that is several years newer.

post #122 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by nht View Post


Assuming their PDAF implementation is good. Sony (I think) had issues with theirs although nikon nailed it in their small sensor implementation. Evidently it is non-trivial even for companies with a lot of camera sensor experience to get right the first time.

 

It should be noted that Samsung DOES have a lot of camera sensor experience, though they are not as well known in that world as Sony and Nikon.

post #123 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by richsadams View Post

In my experience Synaptics builds terribly buggy touch pads so that bodes very well for "me too, me too!" Samsung's fingerprint touch efforts. 1oyvey.gif

 

I always thought that Apple used Synaptics' technology, but apparently not. They went from using Cirque's GlidePoint in the first PowerBooks to their own trackpad tech. I must say, I have yet to use a PC notebook with a trackpad as good as every Mac that I've ever used. Nothing compares.

post #124 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by EricTheHalfBee View Post


You mean like Android users claiming the notification centre was ripped off Android or the Atrix had a fingerprint sensor first? Or Control Centre?

Android users are notorious for thinking they had everything first. I can't count the number of "iOS 7 is just a ripoff of Android........" posts I've seen since iOS 7 was first revealed.

 

 

Yah, that's the effect of today's "instant, always-on, right-now, me-too" world that we live in. I don't think there's anything wrong with borrowing ideas from competitors to improve products. The only time there is a problem is when the entire product matches a competitors. That's where this whole "who ripped off who" mental-attack started. Google and Samsung *are* guilty of ripping off entire implementations, but I think the world has evolved past that now. 

post #125 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by coolfactor View Post

I always thought that Apple used Synaptics' technology, but apparently not. They went from using Cirque's GlidePoint in the first PowerBooks to their own trackpad tech. I must say, I have yet to use a PC notebook with a trackpad as good as every Mac that I've ever used. Nothing compares.

I see that Alps, who bought out Cirque, is still an Apple supplier tho.
http://images.apple.com/supplierresponsibility/pdf/Apple_Supplier_List_2013.pdf
melior diabolus quem scies
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melior diabolus quem scies
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post #126 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by coolfactor View Post
 

 

I always thought that Apple used Synaptics' technology, but apparently not. They went from using Cirque's GlidePoint in the first PowerBooks to their own trackpad tech. I must say, I have yet to use a PC notebook with a trackpad as good as every Mac that I've ever used. Nothing compares.

IBM/Lenovo Thinkpads are certainly no worse.

post #127 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by coolfactor View Post
 

 

 

Yah, that's the effect of today's "instant, always-on, right-now, me-too" world that we live in. I don't think there's anything wrong with borrowing ideas from competitors to improve products. The only time there is a problem is when the entire product matches a competitors. That's where this whole "who ripped off who" mental-attack started. Google and Samsung *are* guilty of ripping off entire implementations, but I think the world has evolved past that now. 

This basically sums it up. Competitors SHOULD borrow a feature here and there from each other to make a better product. Samsung would be the dumbest company in the world to not eventually go 64-bit and include a fingerprint sensor, so I am not bashing them for "copying". I can't see viable alternatives for these things... like Apple did with NOT copying NFC bump sharing and instead implementing a much better AirDrop tech.

 

But Samsungs first post-iPhone smart phone was essentially an exact replica, that part is a bit cheesy.

post #128 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by dstarsboy View Post
 

This basically sums it up. Competitors SHOULD borrow a feature here and there from each other to make a better product. Samsung would be the dumbest company in the world to not eventually go 64-bit and include a fingerprint sensor, so I am not bashing them for "copying". I can't see viable alternatives for these things... like Apple did with NOT copying NFC bump sharing and instead implementing a much better AirDrop tech.

 

But Samsungs first post-iPhone smart phone was essentially an exact replica, that part is a bit cheesy.

Cheesy, yes. But we have all benefited from this, since having a lower-cost competitor is certainly driving Apple to improve their product (and the Samsung et al's devices are really quite nice, and give a viable alternative, even if you are Apple-preferring).

post #129 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by marubeni View Post
 

Cheesy, yes. But we have all benefited from this, since having a lower-cost competitor is certainly driving Apple to improve their product (and the Samsung et al's devices are really quite nice, and give a viable alternative, even if you are Apple-preferring).

Yeah, better product but it hasn't done much to drive the iPhone price down at all, which would be nice...

 

Am I missing something or is Samsung's S5 top tier phone not really "lower-cost"? From what I read, I think it starts at $850.

post #130 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by dstarsboy View Post
 

Yeah, better product but it hasn't done much to drive the iPhone price down at all, which would be nice...

 

Am I missing something or is Samsung's S5 top tier phone not really "lower-cost"? From what I read, I think it starts at $850.

 

The top-tier phone is not lower cost, but go down a rung, and you get phones with similar functionality and much lower price (so Apple has to give you more to justify the high prices).

post #131 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by marubeni View Post
 

 

It should be noted that Samsung DOES have a lot of camera sensor experience, though they are not as well known in that world as Sony and Nikon.

 

Yes they do…I was just pointing out that just having on sensor PDAF doesn't always mean it's faster than a good CDAF implementation.  A good PDAF implementation should/will win over a good CDAF…at least when there is enough light anyway.

post #132 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by marubeni View Post
 

 

It should be noted that Samsung DOES have a lot of camera sensor experience, though they are not as well known in that world as Sony and Nikon.

 

I agree that they do but from what I can see, they don't really look everything holistically. Their camera sensor experience doesn't necessarily translate to solid camera software. Apple uses sensors from Sony, but because of their focus on developing solid camera software, photos end up looking better than phones from Sony using the same sensor. As a side note; I love Sony's cameras. They have been pushing limits on a lot of fronts and some of the stuff they have been showing off is amazing.

post #133 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by foad View Post
 

 

I agree that they do but from what I can see, they don't really look everything holistically. Their camera sensor experience doesn't necessarily translate to solid camera software. Apple uses sensors from Sony, but because of their focus on developing solid camera software, photos end up looking better than phones from Sony using the same sensor. As a side note; I love Sony's cameras. They have been pushing limits on a lot of fronts and some of the stuff they have been showing off is amazing.

 

Yes, I agree with all that. Samsung also had never really tried to enter the high-end photo/video business (probably not enough upside for them), and I think that Sony is in it for the same reason Honda does F1 -- you learn a lot.

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