or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › General › General Discussion › MLB to reportedly have thousands of iBeacons ready for game day
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

MLB to reportedly have thousands of iBeacons ready for game day

post #1 of 39
Thread Starter 
According to a report on Thursday, Major League Baseball will start rolling out thousands of iBeacons in 20 ballparks across the U.S. next week, the goal being system readiness by opening day in March.

MLB


Citing sources with knowledge of the situation, MacRumors reports 20 parks will be rigged with about 100 iBeacons each when opening day rolls around on Mar. 31. Among the first teams to get the microlocation technology are Boston, LA Dodgers, Milwaukee, San Diego and San Francisco.

Using iBeacons built by Qualcomm, the rollout will be one of the largest to date, not including Apple's own deployment in its over 250 U.S. retail stores.

For now, it is unclear what functionality the MLB iBeacons will carry as each ballpark is largely responsible for what features it would like to implement. The MLB provides a team-configurable iOS app that will likely be used in tandem with the iBeacon rollout.

With the MLB.com At the Ballpark iOS app, users are able to check-in for rewards, carry tickets and pull up maps. With iBeacon, the app's functionality could be augmented to include granular location data, automatic ticket-taking and other advanced features.

Apple's iBeacon technology uses the Bluetooth Low Energy protocol to offer two-way wireless communication at varying distances. For example, in a store setting the system can dole out coupons or special deals to end users, while simultaneously gathering customer traffic information.
post #2 of 39
You can gather a lot more information fron this than freking thermostats.. but i guess no one cares..
post #3 of 39
Very cool.
post #4 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by jpmia View Post

You can gather a lot more information fron this than freking thermostats.. but i guess no one cares..

Remember Apple is not Google.

When Tony repeatedly stated, "current" everyone realized the he was telling the truth. The current privacy policies would not be changed. The NEW privacy policies would be written by Google.

Less than a week after starting his promotion of his sale to Google, Tony changes his words to state, "opt-in" for privacy changes.

Since Google is not known for opt-in, Tony's attempts to quell people's distrust of Google failed.

Tony has not spoken this week. I wonder if he realized the public considered him a liar.

By the way, I unsubscribed from Nest's email list today. I had downloaded the Nest iOS app before the Google purchase. Even though I deleted the app after the purchase I remained on the Nest email list. Disturbingly, Nest would not permanently remove me from its email list. I have blocked future emails from Nest.
post #5 of 39

Well,, hopefully Comerica Park in Detroit will be one of them, and I can see what the story is.  I'm curious.  

post #6 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by leavingthebigG View Post


Remember Apple is not Google.

When Tony repeatedly stated, "current" everyone realized the he was telling the truth. The current privacy policies would not be changed. The NEW privacy policies would be written by Google.

Less than a week after starting his promotion of his sale to Google, Tony changes his words to state, "opt-in" for privacy changes.

Since Google is not known for opt-in, Tony's attempts to quell people's distrust of Google failed.

Tony has not spoken this week. I wonder if he realized the public considered him a liar.

By the way, I unsubscribed from Nest's email list today. I had downloaded the Nest iOS app before the Google purchase. Even though I deleted the app after the purchase I remained on the Nest email list. Disturbingly, Nest would not permanently remove me from its email list. I have blocked future emails from Nest.

Yep, Apple is different.  They just don't tell you what they do the data they collect from you.

post #7 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by leavingthebigG View Post

Less than a week after starting his promotion of his sale to Google, Tony changes his words to state, "opt-in" for privacy changes.

Since Google is not known for opt-in, Tony's attempts to quell people's distrust of Google failed.

Tony has not spoken this week. I wonder if he realized the public considered him a liar.

 

Tony is now a billionaire and doesn't care what you think. I wouldn't have sold to Google, but I'm not him. The average person doesn't even know who Nest is, let alone never think about whether they should trust Google or not. How do you think Google have gotten this far?

Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
Reply
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
Reply
post #8 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland View Post

Tony is now a billionaire and doesn't care what you think. I wouldn't have sold to Google, but I'm not him. The average person doesn't even know who Nest is, let alone never think about whether they should trust Google or not. How do you think Google have gotten this far?

You may be right, but I care. And that is important to me. Can you understand that?
post #9 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by mistercow View Post

Yep, Apple is different.  They just don't tell you what they do the data they collect from you.

Oh well. Trust with Apple is stronger than trust with Google for me. When that changes, I will think how to proceed.
post #10 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by mistercow View Post
 

Yep, Apple is different.  They just don't tell you what they do the data they collect from you.

 

You may not understand this.  You may NEVER understand this.  But I trust Apple.  Granted, I trust them as I would trust any mega-corporation, but I trust them.

 

Think of it this way.  Apple already has my money.  When I spend $2,500 on a new iMac or $5 on a movie rental from iTunes or however much on a new iPad Air or iPhone ... etc., they have my money.  They don't need to get more from me.  They sell hardware, and a little bit (it's hilarious that billions is considered a "little bit" at this point) from stuff like iTunes.  They don't need to sell my information to make a profit -- they made a profit when they sold me my iMac or iPhone or iPad or whatever.

 

So, I don't trust Apple because I think they are magically good (though I do think that Tim Cook is a legitimately good person).  I trust Apple because it's not really in their interest to screw me over.  If they want my money, come out with a cool product.  I'll give it to them. :)

post #11 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by leavingthebigG View Post

You may be right, but I care. And that is important to me. Can you understand that?

Oh I do. Not going to do you any good.
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
Reply
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
Reply
post #12 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by AaronJ View Post

You may not understand this.  You may NEVER understand this.  But I trust Apple.  Granted, I trust them as I would trust any mega-corporation, but I trust them.

Think of it this way.  Apple already has my money.  When I spend $2,500 on a new iMac or $5 on a movie rental from iTunes or however much on a new iPad Air or iPhone ... etc., they have my money.  They don't need to get more from me.  They sell hardware, and a little bit (it's hilarious that billions is considered a "little bit" at this point) from stuff like iTunes.  They don't need to sell my information to make a profit -- they made a profit when they sold me my iMac or iPhone or iPad or whatever.

So, I don't trust Apple because I think they are magically good (though I do think that Tim Cook is a legitimately good person).  I trust Apple because it's not really in their interest to screw me over.  If they want my money, come out with a cool product.  I'll give it to them. 1smile.gif

Just keep in mind Apple has little control over iBeacons, and zero control over what the people using them collect nor what they do with it.

This isn't (just) your trusted Apple tracking detailed venue movements (dang man, you staying in there all day?), collecting and collating queries and purchases, and merging your visits to one with your visit to another partner locale. Short of someone physically following behind you and taking pictures there's never been the commonly available tech for such finely detailed location and intimate interest mining until Beacons began a roll-out. This takes your on-line persona and merges it with your real-life activities. And yes, I suspect un-trusted Google will be accessing and using some of this iBeacon-enabled data too.

Just seems like if you don't like being followed on-line you'd hate adding this to your personal profile too.
Edited by Gatorguy - 1/31/14 at 5:51am
melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
post #13 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by mistercow View Post

Yep, Apple is different.  They just don't tell you what they do the data they collect from you.

You can ask them:
http://www.apple.com/privacy/
post #14 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

Just keep in mind Apple has little control over iBeacons, and zero control over what the people using them collect nor what they do with it.

This isn't (just) your trusted Apple tracking detailed venue movements (dang man, you staying in there all day?), collecting and collating queries and purchases, and merging your visits to one with your visit to another partner locale. Short of someone physically following behind you and taking pictures there's never been the commonly available tech for such finely detailed location and intimate interest mining until Beacons began a roll-out. This takes your on-line persona and merges it with your real-life activities. And yes, I suspect un-trusted Google will be accessing and using some of this iBeacon-enabled data too.

Just seems like if you don't like being followed on-line you'd hate adding this to your personal profile too.

IBeacon is short range, they won't be able to follow you anywhere.

Presumably an app that has access to iBeacon and GPS can be malicious, but Apple has tight controls over app access to data and accessories (camera, mic, MFi devices).

Last report says 0.7% malware on iPhone.

Over 90% targeting Android. Plus Google ignoring Do-Not-Track, and defended successfully to keep ignoring it.
post #15 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by patsu View Post

You can ask them:
http://www.apple.com/privacy/

Have you asked them anything about your personal profile details and/or how they specifically use it, and were you satisfied with the answer you got? Honest question.
melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
post #16 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

Have you asked them anything about your personal profile details and/or how they specifically use it, and were you satisfied with the answer you got? Honest question.

Why ask me ! Ask Apple yourself.

That page has general info.

You can also go to Settings > Privacy > Ad tracking to see what apps are gathering your social data. I think you can turn them off but I don't have any ^_^.

There are other settings page for checking their logging too.
post #17 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by patsu View Post

IBeacon is short range, they won't be able to follow you anywhere.

Presumably an app that has access to iBeacon and GPS can be malicious, but Apple has tight controls over app access to data and accessories (camera, mic, MFi devices).

Last report says 0.7% malware on iPhone.

Over 90% targeting Android. Plus Google ignoring Do-Not-Track, and defended successfully to keep ignoring it.

AFAIK Apple has no control at all over what the companies using iBeacons can collect about your visit and share with other parties. We're not talking about malware, nor even iBeacons themselves. Instead various individual company privacy policies allow for a wide and vague range of information they collect, share and combine with info from other sources when you use their interfacing app. Without a complementary app iBeacons are relatively useless. While Apple may (or may not) vet a particular app available from the appstore they have no control whatsoever over what happens to any information gathered when you use it.

As for Do Not Track, I believe Google announced after-the-fact they they would now honor user settings. Bing doesn't say so but last I read they ignore the Do Not Track header. Yahoo came out and specifically said they'll ignore it.
Edited by Gatorguy - 1/31/14 at 7:01am
melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
post #18 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by patsu View Post

Why ask me ! Ask Apple yourself.

Huh? I asked if you had tried it. I already knew I hadn't. 1rolleyes.gif
melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
post #19 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

AFAIK Apple has no control at all over what the companies using iBeacons can collect about your visit and share with other parties. We're not talking about malware, nor even iBeacons themselves. Instead various individual company privacy policies allow for a wide and vague range of information they collect, share and combine with info from other sources when you use their interfacing app. Without a complementary app iBeacons are relatively useless. While Apple may (or may not) vet a particular app available from the appstore they have no control whatsoever over what happens to any information gathered when you use it.

They do have control over the app in AppStore. A few apps got delisted because of feedback and complains by users.

Why can't I mention malware ? They can use BLE too. If an app abuses iBeacon to invade user privacy, it is a malware.

Quote:
As for Do Not Track, I believe Google announced after-the-fact they they would now honor user settings. Bing doesn't say so but last I read they ignore the Do Not Track header. Yahoo came out and specifically said they'll ignore it.

They only honor it now after the lawsuit. Everyone has reluctantly fall in line now after so many years. People had to fight for their privacy:
http://paidcontent.org/2012/02/17/419-google-on-defensive-yet-again-in-snafu-over-ad-tracking-in-safari-brows/

And the British are still fighting:
http://gigaom.com/2014/01/16/privacy-activists-can-sue-google-in-uk-over-safari-tracking-court-decides/

As for MS:
http://money.cnn.com/2012/06/07/technology/do-not-track/index.htm
Quote:
Microsoft (MSFT, Fortune 500) announced last week that it would become the first browser maker to turn Do No Track on as the default setting in its upcoming version of Internet Explorer, called IE10.

I believe FireFox and IE were the first 2 browsers to support DNT.
Edited by patsu - 1/31/14 at 7:37am
post #20 of 39
We at Mahana (www.getmahana.com) have used the Qualcomm beacons and find their offering intriguing and their build quality really nice. They go above and beyond the iBeacon standard, so I would call them "iBeacon-like." The biggest challenge with these and most beacons is the battery life. I wonder if MLB is using the small CR2032 battery ones or the 4 AA ones. Either way in either 3 months or a year, they will have to change the batteries on thousands of devices.

I cannot wait for solar and/or A/C powered devices.
post #21 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

Huh? I asked if you had tried it. I already knew I hadn't. 1rolleyes.gif

I was replying to "how they specifically use it". ^_^

Their track record in implementing privacy mechanisms is good enough for me. Their business do not rely on advertising anyway.
post #22 of 39
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post
Huh? I asked if you had tried it. I already knew I hadn't. 1rolleyes.gif

 

It’s almost as though that doesn’t matter.

Originally Posted by Marvin

The only thing more insecure than Android’s OS is its userbase.
Reply

Originally Posted by Marvin

The only thing more insecure than Android’s OS is its userbase.
Reply
post #23 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by rbagdonas View Post

We at Mahana (www.getmahana.com) have used the Qualcomm beacons and find their offering intriguing and their build quality really nice. They go above and beyond the iBeacon standard, so I would call them "iBeacon-like." The biggest challenge with these and most beacons is the battery life. I wonder if MLB is using the small CR2032 battery ones or the 4 AA ones. Either way in either 3 months or a year, they will have to change the batteries on thousands of devices.

I cannot wait for solar and/or A/C powered devices.


There are many kinds of iBeacon. Some last longer battery-wise, but they may have less features.

 

In fact, devices like iPhone and Android phone can be iBeacons too.

post #24 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by patsu View Post

As for MS:
http://money.cnn.com/2012/06/07/technology/do-not-track/index.htm
I believe FireFox and IE were the first 2 browsers to support DNT.

Sure, they included Do Not Track in their browser, just as Safari and Chrome and Firefox now offer too. Bing still ignores it last I knew, even tho they're a MS product. Just do a search for "Bing ignores Do Not Track".
melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
post #25 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post


Sure, they included Do Not Track in their browser, just as Safari and Chrome and Firefox now offer too. Bing still ignores it last I knew, even tho they're a MS product. Just do a search for "Bing ignores Do Not Track".


They obey DNT. Otherwise people will be kicking MS' ass right now.

 

What gets ignored may be IE's DNT "default on" policy. Advertisers agreed to the entire DNT framework provided the DNT flag is off by default. But IE defaults it to on, pissing off the advertisers.

post #26 of 39

MLB is using Qualcomm beacons.  I have several Qualcomm beacons on my desk right now.  They are not true iBeacons (just take the BLE Explorer down to the Apple store to see the difference in what they broadcast).  MLB will not be using iOS or Android devices because a sub-$20 beacon is much cheaper than a bulky iPod Touch, iPhone, or Andoird device.  My quoted times of 3 months and 1 year come directly from my contact at Qualcomm.  I have the pleasure of leading our beacon team at Mahana, so I am living and breathing this stuff daily.

 

BTW, if you are in Austin for SXSWi, come to the beacon meetup.  Find it at http://btle.eventbrite.com and I will see you there

post #27 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by rbagdonas View Post
 

MLB is using Qualcomm beacons.  I have several Qualcomm beacons on my desk right now.  They are not true iBeacons (just take the BLE Explorer down to the Apple store to see the difference in what they broadcast).  MLB will not be using iOS or Android devices because a sub-$20 beacon is much cheaper than a bulky iPod Touch, iPhone, or Andoird device.  My quoted times of 3 months and 1 year come directly from my contact at Qualcomm.  I have the pleasure of leading our beacon team at Mahana, so I am living and breathing this stuff daily.

 

BTW, if you are in Austin for SXSWi, come to the beacon meetup.  Find it at http://btle.eventbrite.com and I will see you there

 

Yes, it depends on your use cases of course. Some iBeacon claims longer battery life perhaps because they emit less ?

As for MLB not using straight iBeacons.... that's in the stadium side. Every iOS7 device is an iBeacon. That's what's driving the iBeacon economy today.

post #28 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by patsu View Post
 

 

Yes, it depends on your use cases of course. Some iBeacon claims longer battery life perhaps because they emit less ?

As for MLB not using iBeacons.... that's in the stadium side. Every iOS7 device is an iBeacon.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by rbagdonas View Post
 

MLB is using Qualcomm beacons.  I have several Qualcomm beacons on my desk right now.  They are not true iBeacons (just take the BLE Explorer down to the Apple store to see the difference in what they broadcast).  MLB will not be using iOS or Android devices because a sub-$20 beacon is much cheaper than a bulky iPod Touch, iPhone, or Andoird device.  My quoted times of 3 months and 1 year come directly from my contact at Qualcomm.  I have the pleasure of leading our beacon team at Mahana, so I am living and breathing this stuff daily.

 

BTW, if you are in Austin for SXSWi, come to the beacon meetup.  Find it at http://btle.eventbrite.com and I will see you there

 

Beacons can be tuned for transmission power and transmission interval.  Most default to 10 times a second which is overkill unless you are running in background mode in iOS because it takes longer to pick up and process the signal.  Every iOS device is not an iBeacon.  Only those that are turned into transmitters are iBeacons.  Every iOS device is iBeacon-capable.

 

Back to work on Mahana....

post #29 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by rbagdonas View Post
 

 

 

Every iOS device is not an iBeacon.  Only those that are turned into transmitters are iBeacons.  Every iOS device is iBeacon-capable.

 

 

Any iOS7 app can send and receive iBeacon signals if it wants to. So every iOS7 device is effectively an iBeacon in the context of iBeacon-like solutions. Naturally if the device is off, or if the app is not running, then it's just a phone.

post #30 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by AaronJ View Post
 

 

You may not understand this.  You may NEVER understand this.  But I trust Apple.  Granted, I trust them as I would trust any mega-corporation, but I trust them.

 

Think of it this way.  Apple already has my money.  When I spend $2,500 on a new iMac or $5 on a movie rental from iTunes or however much on a new iPad Air or iPhone ... etc., they have my money.  They don't need to get more from me.  They sell hardware, and a little bit (it's hilarious that billions is considered a "little bit" at this point) from stuff like iTunes.  They don't need to sell my information to make a profit -- they made a profit when they sold me my iMac or iPhone or iPad or whatever.

 

So, I don't trust Apple because I think they are magically good (though I do think that Tim Cook is a legitimately good person).  I trust Apple because it's not really in their interest to screw me over.  If they want my money, come out with a cool product.  I'll give it to them. :)

 

That's fine that you trust them.  I only wonder why people would trust Apple to collect their data, but not Google.  They're both large, regulated corporations.  Why is one inherently better than the other?  Once Apple sells data to one third party, it's out there.  I doubt there's any clause in the contract that limits what the third party can do with your data, so they can very well sell it to someone else.  So my question would be do you believe Apple doesn't sell *any* data at all?  I find that highly unlikely.

post #31 of 39
Originally Posted by mistercow View Post

I only wonder why people would trust Apple to collect their data, but not Google.  They're both large, regulated corporations.  Why is one inherently better than the other?

 

Because one company’s business model exists solely to take people’s information and whore it out to the highest bidder… and the other one sells products.

Originally Posted by Marvin

The only thing more insecure than Android’s OS is its userbase.
Reply

Originally Posted by Marvin

The only thing more insecure than Android’s OS is its userbase.
Reply
post #32 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Because one company’s business model exists solely to take people’s information and whore it out to the highest bidder primarily to handle on-line ad placement for other companies with a smaller emphasis on hardware… and the other one primarily sells hardware with a smaller emphasis on ad placement.
melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
post #33 of 39
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

 

 

You make a tidy little living, don’t you.

Originally Posted by Marvin

The only thing more insecure than Android’s OS is its userbase.
Reply

Originally Posted by Marvin

The only thing more insecure than Android’s OS is its userbase.
Reply
post #34 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

You make a tidy little living, don’t you.

I manage to get by. You?
melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
post #35 of 39
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post
I manage to get by. You?

 

Difference is I don’t get paid for this.

Originally Posted by Marvin

The only thing more insecure than Android’s OS is its userbase.
Reply

Originally Posted by Marvin

The only thing more insecure than Android’s OS is its userbase.
Reply
post #36 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Difference is I don’t get paid for this.

Difference? I don't get paid for this either. You're claiming I do? Just want to be totally clear on what you're saying. I think we've had this conversation before.
melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
post #37 of 39
iBeacons are awesome: if you want to know even more about this technology, feel free to download my white-paper titled "iBeacon Bible" from http://www.gaia-matrix.com

Andy Cavallini
post #38 of 39
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post
Difference? I don't get paid for this either. You're claiming I do? Just want to be totally clear on what you're saying. I think we’ve had this conversation before.

 

Sorry, I was looking for an animated gif of a chain being yanked, but there’s apparently a lot that isn’t on the Internet.

Originally Posted by Marvin

The only thing more insecure than Android’s OS is its userbase.
Reply

Originally Posted by Marvin

The only thing more insecure than Android’s OS is its userbase.
Reply
post #39 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by mistercow View Post
 

 

That's fine that you trust them.  I only wonder why people would trust Apple to collect their data, but not Google.  They're both large, regulated corporations.  Why is one inherently better than the other?  Once Apple sells data to one third party, it's out there.  I doubt there's any clause in the contract that limits what the third party can do with your data, so they can very well sell it to someone else.  So my question would be do you believe Apple doesn't sell *any* data at all?  I find that highly unlikely.

 

I trust Apple over Google because Google's entire business is predicated on advertising and information collection.  While Apple's business is based on selling hardware, and some small amount of  income from stuff like iTunes.

 

As I said, what's Apple's business reason to sell my information when I just gave them $2,700 for a new iMac?  Apple's margins are pretty darned high, as we all know.  I have an iMac 27", an iPhone 5S, an iPad Air, an older MacBook, and have spent many thousands on iTunes purchases.  I can't see what their motivation would be.

 

Like I said, they already have my money. :)

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Discussion
AppleInsider › Forums › General › General Discussion › MLB to reportedly have thousands of iBeacons ready for game day