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iPhone 5c catches fire in student's pocket, causes second-degree burns [u] - Page 2

post #41 of 106

Great, now every al-Qaeda wanna be hijacker will be buying iPhone 5c's now

post #42 of 106

This gives a whole new meaning to 'Hot Pocket'!

Ten years ago, we had Steve Jobs, Bob Hope and Johnny Cash.  Today we have no Jobs, no Hope and no Cash.

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Ten years ago, we had Steve Jobs, Bob Hope and Johnny Cash.  Today we have no Jobs, no Hope and no Cash.

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post #43 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by Retrogusto View Post
 

I like the last two lines from the Portland Press Herald article:


Hopefully, there is no butt pocket on yoga pants.

post #44 of 106

  I don't think it matters if she kept it in a dumb place or not.  That only matters if we're talking about a fire while we've got it on us.  A phone can easily get the same trauma when on a surface if a crushing event happens, and it doesn't seem to require a "perfect storm" of events (though obviously we're not hearing stories like this or hers regularly by any stretch, so I'm not saying it's likely).  Back pocket placement isn't the issue.  That a phone getting crushed would ignite is.  I can easily imagine a cracked, non-functioning out of warranty phone getting tossed into a dumpster and a desk being dropped on top of it.  

 

Ignition after the amount of force in sitting on it doesn't mean problem solved by not having it in your pocket.


Edited by jlandd - 2/3/14 at 9:01am
post #45 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by lukevaxhacker View Post

My daughters' middle school solves this problem simply: All students turn their mobile phones into the office for the day.


Quite a metamorphosis!

 

Does a popping sound and smoke constitute a "fire"?  I know many people believe "where there's smoke there's fire", however, in the absence of flames or ignition of available fuels, I don't think "fire" is an appropriate description.  But I wasn't there.

 

Sitting on one's smartphone is monumentally stupid--imagine shards of glass slicing through your pocket and into your flesh! Yet many people do put their phones in the back pocket. 

 

This does not bode well for "wearable technology", IMO.

post #46 of 106
Ah ok. He sat on it...

Ah she's a she.

On the original article, someone commented :
Quote:
This poor child... now marked for life as the little girl who's pants caught on fire. This will never be forgotten.

Edited by ClemyNX - 2/3/14 at 9:11am
post #47 of 106
C for "catches fire"?
 
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post #48 of 106

As the number of people carrying flammable lithium-ion batteries around with them all the time increases, it is inevitable some will fail and overheat.  This isn't a systemic fail mode for Apple phones and occurs in Android, Windows, and Blackberry phones occasionally too.

post #49 of 106
Originally Posted by jlandd View Post
I don't think it matters if she kept it in a dumb place or not.

 

Are you serious? A lit match shouldn’t ignite gas when thrown on it?

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
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Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
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post #50 of 106

It says she had it in her back pocket....I see girls, especially, doing this quite often because the front pockets are so small these days.

post #51 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rot'nApple View Post
 

This gives a whole new meaning to 'Hot Pocket'!

Do'h yup. Hate those things.

Hokey religions and ancient weapons are no match for a good blaster by your side, kid.
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Hokey religions and ancient weapons are no match for a good blaster by your side, kid.
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post #52 of 106

I feel bad for this girl, especially if she was fat or unpopular to start with.

Now she will be known as the fat girl who broke her iPhone by sitting on it.

And if that wasn't enough then she was rolling around on the ground with smoke billowing out of her ass.

 

Just try living that down!

Better call Saul…pain and suffering and ongoing emotional distress.

post #53 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnny Mozzarella View Post
 

I feel bad for this girl, especially if she was fat or unpopular to start with.

Now she will be known as the fat girl who broke her iPhone by sitting on it.

And if that wasn't enough then she was rolling around on the ground with smoke billowing out of her ass.

 

Just try living that down!

Better call Saul…pain and suffering and ongoing emotional distress.

We had an incident at my high school many moons ago. A girl went to sit on the toilet and the porcelain cracked and smashed under her. She got a few lacerations and was fine in the end (no pun intended) but she never lived it down especially for her last 2 years at school. Kids at that age can be very cruel. 

post #54 of 106
Originally Posted by patpatpat View Post
We had an incident at my high school many moons ago.

 

There’s the intended pun.

 
Kids at that age can be very cruel. 

 

Also truthful. For example, it’s not really all that okay to be fat. So when you’re made fun of for it, you change. Worked wonders for me; I’ll never be fat again, now simply because I care enough to be healthy.

 

Should’ve seen me back in the day. Spherical. Now with my shirt off you can see my heart beating.

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
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Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply
post #55 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by TeaEarleGreyHot View Post
 

Sitting on one's smartphone is monumentally stupid--imagine shards of glass slicing through your pocket and into your flesh! Yet many people do put their phones in the back pocket. 

 

I was intending to speak generally, and not exclusively about this one incident. Second degree burns are serious, and I acknowledge what others here have said: the kid is likely to experience additional grief from the teasing of other schoolchildren. She is not alone in enduring such teasing, and I offer my sympathies.  It's as tough to be a kid today as it ever was.

post #56 of 106

I can see the temptation of a rear pocket: no keys or other metal objects to scratch up the phone's screen in an unused back pocket.

 

With a phone heavy enough to always be noticed it's still a gamble, but with the more recent lighter ones it's only a matter of time..

post #57 of 106

I wonder which way the phone was positioned - screen toward her body or back of case toward her body. It could have also been a situation which developed over time from constant misuse and the final ignition occurred upon sitting. I've noticed my iPhone 5 gets really warm in my front jeans pocket if there is no air circulation such as when I was taking a nap and the phone was trapped between my body and the sofa. When I awoke and checked the time on the phone it was quite warm, and there were no apps really running at the time. In general use though, at least the iPhone 5/5s have better heat dissipation than the 5c because of their aluminum cases. 

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post #58 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by icoco3 View Post
 

 

People that actually pay for the phone themselves (on or off contract) don't do that generally.

 

I work in a 2 school districts and I see kids doing this constantly...that and dropping their phones. But to your point, they probably didn't buy the phone, their parents did. 

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post #59 of 106
She had probably been sitting on it the past two months. Duh!
post #60 of 106
I believe the girl sat on the phone, it broke and internals electrified parts came in contact and get on fire. For this, the iPhones should be made more flexible.

Smartphones don’t have to be flat. They don’t have to be rigid either. LG and Samsung are offering 2 phones that goes in this direction.

Reports says Apple is copying Samsung Galaxy Note 3 phablette, it could also copy LG G Flex flexible smartphone.

Doing so, Apple would make an "evolution" of the flexible phone.

It could save butt.
post #61 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by Frood View Post
 

As the number of people carrying flammable lithium-ion batteries around with them all the time increases, it is inevitable some will fail and overheat.  This isn't a systemic fail mode for Apple phones and occurs in Android, Windows, and Blackberry phones occasionally too.

 

I agree. My palm pre got hot all the time. Would have to take the battery out until it cooled. My Microsoft Bluetooth mouse at work, with Lithium Ion batteries, fell to the floor once. Five minutes later, it, too, was getting warm/hot to touch. So it isn't even just phones, it is anything with Lithium Ion (and I suspect, other types of) batteries.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by jlandd View Post
 

  I don't think it matters if she kept it in a dumb place or not.  That only matters if we're talking about a fire while we've got it on us.  A phone can easily get the same trauma when on a surface if a crushing event happens, and it doesn't seem to require a "perfect storm" of events (though obviously we're not hearing stories like this or hers regularly by any stretch, so I'm not saying it's likely).  Back pocket placement isn't the issue.  That a phone getting crushed would ignite is.  I can easily imagine a cracked, non-functioning out of warranty phone getting tossed into a dumpster and a desk being dropped on top of it.  

 

Ignition after the amount of force in sitting on it doesn't mean problem solved by not having it in your pocket.

 

Well, you aren't supposed to put batteries in the trash in the past few states I have lived in. They are supposed to be "recycled" and "disposed of properly" - But the real issue is that they are hazardous waste, with the ability to ignite. These are energy sources, and that energy must go somewhere if it isn't properly contained/restrained. Hence all the warning labels.

 

post #62 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post

Well just as I thought.

Putting costly and fragile electronic devices in your back pocket and bloody well sitting on them, and shifting your weight on them, is NOT the way to take care of your device.

Not Apple's fault.

Don't sit on your devices, folks. This should be obvious, but a good chunk of the under-30 population of today is practically brain-dead.

 

Whether people should put their phones in their back pocket or not is irrelevant. The fact is that people WILL put their phones in their back pocket. It's not at all uncommon. So you have to design for that. Which is not to say they have to make the phone indestructible. Of course that would come with far too many trade-offs. But they should at least do whatever they can such that a common method of carrying the phone doesn't cause it to burst into flames. Could just be a manufacturing default though.

post #63 of 106

This sucks. I'm glad she wasn't more seriously injured. Damned lio batteries carry so much energy in them. At least they're normally safe for the vast majority.

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by lukevaxhacker View Post

My daughters' middle school solves this problem simply: All students turn their mobile phones into the office for the day.

 

That's one way to handle it. On the other hand, my son's middle school encourages them to bring their phones/iPod Touch devices to school, and to class, and participate in class with them. They all get school-hosted wifi access too.

post #64 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by jpd514 View Post

I believe the girl sat on the phone, it broke and internals electrified parts came in contact and get on fire. For this, the iPhones should be made more flexible.

Smartphones don’t have to be flat. They don’t have to be rigid either. LG and Samsung are offering 2 phones that goes in this direction.

Reports says Apple is copying Samsung Galaxy Note 3 phablette, it could also copy LG G Flex flexible smartphone.

Doing so, Apple would make an "evolution" of the flexible phone.

It could save butt.

You can't stupid-proof everything. Flexible or not, hours of sitting on the phone and the force of sitting down will cause damage.
post #65 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post

Well just as I thought.

Putting costly and fragile electronic devices in your back pocket and bloody well sitting on them, and shifting your weight on them, is NOT the way to take care of your device.

Not Apple's fault.

Don't sit on your devices, folks. This should be obvious, but a good chunk of the under-30 population of today is practically brain-dead.


It's true. And they always try to defend this stupid, stupid practice. These devices are thin, narrow, and long, and they are not compatible with tight clothes and the stresses induced by the body as you move about, sit, etc. I tried my 5th gen Touch in the front pocket of some pants that are tighter than I normally wear, and it was immediately obvious that the Touch was being stressed. So what did I do? I stopped carrying it that way under those conditions. Looser pants with deeper pockets are fine, but I'm still careful to ensure the long side of the Touch is oriented parallel to my leg when I sit down. I would never consider carrying it a back pocket and sitting down on it. That's just completely stupid. That said, I certainly hope that the phone bursting into flame when bent in half is an anomaly.

post #66 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by TeaEarleGreyHot View Post


Quite a metamorphosis!

Does a popping sound and smoke constitute a "fire"?  I know many people believe "where there's smoke there's fire", however, in the absence of flames or ignition of available fuels, I don't think "fire" is an appropriate description.  But I wasn't there.

Sitting on one's smartphone is monumentally stupid--imagine shards of glass slicing through your pocket and into your flesh! Yet many people do put their phones in the back pocket. 

This does not bode well for "wearable technology", IMO.

Fire doesn't necessarily need a flame.
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"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
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"Few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example" Mark Twain
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
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post #67 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by jlandd View Post
 

  I don't think it matters if she kept it in a dumb place or not. 

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post
 

 

Are you serious? A lit match shouldn’t ignite gas when thrown on it?

 

You're supporting my point, which was that if it truly did ignite merely by sitting with it in her back pocket, the "Oh, she sat on it, then there's nothing to see here, move along" response is far from what we *may* be looking at.  It doesn't matter if she kept it in safely away in her purse if a heavy object falls on it and this is what happens .03% of the time. 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by starbird73 View Postes.

 

 

Well, you aren't supposed to put batteries in the trash in the past few states I have lived in. They are supposed to be "recycled" and "disposed of properly" - But the real issue is that they are hazardous waste, with the ability to ignite. These are energy sources, and that energy must go somewhere if it isn't properly contained/restrained. Hence all the warning labels.

 

 

Sure, but it's not even about disposing of them properly, though I used the example of the danger of someone tossing one in a dumpster.  It's about anything with equal force of the downward sit of a 13 year old girl on the phone and it catching fire instead of just breaking.

post #68 of 106

If you damage a Li-on battery, it's dangerous. It's not just Apple products.

It's quite simple, don't damage/bend/puncture your iPhone.

 

post #69 of 106

I think this is known as "Khardasianing a phone"

post #70 of 106
Originally Posted by jlandd View Post

You're supporting my point, which was that if it truly did ignite merely by sitting with it in her back pocket, the "Oh, she sat on it, then there's nothing to see here, move along" response is far from what we *may* be looking at.

 

She quite plainly sat on it. I’m nowhere near supporting your point.

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply
post #71 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by jlandd View Post

Sure, but it's not even about disposing of them properly, though I used the example of the danger of someone tossing one in a dumpster.  It's about anything with equal force of the downward sit of a 13 year old girl on the phone and it catching fire instead of just breaking.

It isn't a case of it instantly catching fire. It is the break that causes the fire. That is trade off of our current battery technology. Aside from making every battery literally indestructible (not saying we shouldn't, just not sure the technology/trade offs are there yet), the end user has to take some responsibility and care of it.
post #72 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

She quite plainly sat on it. I’m nowhere near supporting your point.

And it isn't even the sitting on it that causes the issue. It is the damage done when sitting. Every battery has a DO NOT PUNCTURE warning on it, for this very reason.
post #73 of 106
And why exactly wouldn't she immediately notice the phone under her rear end and take it out of her pants pocket?
post #74 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by winterspan View Post

And why exactly wouldn't she immediately notice the phone under her rear end and take it out of her pants pocket?

She obviously put it there and forgot.
"Few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example" Mark Twain
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
Reply
"Few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example" Mark Twain
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
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post #75 of 106

Hmm. Looking at the damage in the picture, are they sure it wasn't held in a flame, lighter, matches, bunsen burner, previous to being placed in the pocket? It's just that to me it looks like the scorching, smoke / soot marks on the screen, & buttons damaged just like the case, look like they could have been caused by an external source.

 

Not saying that something didn't happen in her pocket, but if it was previously damaged by her, or bullies, it's not the phone to blame exactly.

post #76 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crowley View Post

What lie?

That Teslas are perfectly safe automobiles because lithium ion batteries will not catch fire.

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"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

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post #77 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by starbird73 View Post

It isn't a case of it instantly catching fire. It is the break that causes the fire. That is trade off of our current battery technology. Aside from making every battery literally indestructible (not saying we shouldn't, just not sure the technology/trade offs are there yet), the end user has to take some responsibility and care of it.

Where did it break? It looks intact, other than the scorch marks.

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post #78 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post
 

 

She quite plainly sat on it. I’m nowhere near supporting your point.

 

No one's saying she didn't sit on it, of course she did.  Again, if all it takes to ignite it is the weight of a 13 year old girl then the back pocket is not the problem and saying just keep it out of your back pocket is not the answer.   The issue isn't about pockets and sitting.  Besides, you're assuming that she broke the phone by sitting on it, which the story does not say.  Just because she heard a pop when she sat doesn't mean she traumatized the battery with the force, and in fact that is never even implied.  Looking at the picture the phone doesn't look like a phone that was crunched at all, just burned.  If she didn't crunch it, her sitting with it did nothing wrong regardless of the fact that the battery popped when she did.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by starbird73 View Post


It isn't a case of it instantly catching fire. It is the break that causes the fire. That is trade off of our current battery technology. Aside from making every battery literally indestructible (not saying we shouldn't, just not sure the technology/trade offs are there yet), the end user has to take some responsibility and care of it.

 

Yes, absolutely true.  But we can't talk about 13 year olds as if they're 21, and we're really talking about 10 year olds.  If they're responsible enough to use a phone but not enough to understand what we're talking about here, what do we do?  The phones aren't being sold on the basis of children's ability to follow that and really most adults don't follow it either (but that's another thing altogether).

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by starbird73 View Post


And it isn't even the sitting on it that causes the issue. It is the damage done when sitting. Every battery has a DO NOT PUNCTURE warning on it, for this very reason.

 

Yes, but what 10 year old will tell you they've ever read a battery label?  Especially one inside a phone that they never see? 

 

To be sure, these kinds of accidents happen often enough with cell phones in general, and it's not an Apple issue, just a lithium-ion battery one, and none if that hinges on sitting with one in your back pocket.  I'm just saying that the answer really has nothing to do with how she handled it if that's all it took, and I have no doubt it was going to happen with her particular phone eventually no matter what she did, and in the case of a 2 month old phone with all original parts and no modifications we need to stop pointing at her as the cause.  When phone battery fires are reported (Google shows plenty of stories) they're generally never attributed to misuse.  Why are people holding this girl responsible for it, as if she's the problem? 

post #79 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post

Where did it break? It looks intact, other than the scorch marks.

I don't know. Hearing a "POP" implies something broke. Repetitive stress fractures would not be easy to see.
Quote:
Originally Posted by jlandd View Post

No one's saying she didn't sit on it, of course she did.  Again, if all it takes to ignite it is the weight of a 13 year old girl then the back pocket is not the problem and saying just keep it out of your back pocket is not the answer.   The issue isn't about pockets and sitting.  Besides, you're assuming that she broke the phone by sitting on it, which the story does not say.  Just because she heard a pop when she sat doesn't mean she traumatized the battery with the force, and in fact that is never even implied.  Looking at the picture the phone doesn't look like a phone that was crunched at all, just burned.  If she didn't crunch it, her sitting with it did nothing wrong regardless of the fact that the battery popped when she did.


Yes, absolutely true.  But we can't talk about 13 year olds as if they're 21, and we're really talking about 10 year olds.  If they're responsible enough to use a phone but not enough to understand what we're talking about here, what do we do?  The phones aren't being sold on the basis of children's ability to follow that and really most adults don't follow it either (but that's another thing altogether).


Yes, but what 10 year old will tell you they've ever read a battery label?  Especially one inside a phone that they never see? 

To be sure, these kinds of accidents happen often enough with cell phones in general, and it's not an Apple issue, just a lithium-ion battery one, and none if that hinges on sitting with one in your back pocket.  I'm just saying that the answer really has nothing to do with how she handled it if that's all it took, and I have no doubt it was going to happen with her particular phone eventually no matter what she did, and in the case of a 2 month old phone with all original parts and no modifications we need to stop pointing at her as the cause.  When phone battery fires are reported (Google shows plenty of stories) they're generally never attributed to misuse.  Why are people holding this girl responsible for it, as if she's the problem? 

No, not blaming the 10/13 year old directly. She is the responsibility of her parents. Improper use (conditions that cause failure) is the cause, not "the battery wasn't built correctly"

If I hand a 13 year old a BB gun and they shoot their 10 year old brother's eye out by standing three feet away from something, it ricochets off something, is it the gun manufacturers fault? How about the bullet manufacturer? The DPW who made the stop sign that was shot? But we are all jumping to conclusions that this family will sue Apple.

Back to the parents. As a parent of kids 9, 12, and 19, I make sure they know how to take care of things. The younger two have iPod touches. They know the rules. In a case. Not in pant pockets. You don't throw them, put stuff on them, etc. and they look as good as the day they bought them.
post #80 of 106
Originally Posted by starbird73 View Post
As a parent of kids 9, 12, and 19, I make sure they know how to take care of things. The younger two have iPod touches. They know the rules. In a case. Not in pant pockets. You don't throw them, put stuff on them, etc. and they look as good as the day they bought them.

 

I love you.

 

Brings a tear to my eye, parents doing their jobs.

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply
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