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Apple contributes $100M to Obama's ConnectED high-speed internet for education [u]

post #1 of 16
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Apple has pledged $100 million in the form of iPads, desktop and laptop computers, and other educational tools to President Obama's ConnectED initiative that seeks to connect 99 percent of America's students to high-speed internet.

Obama
President Obama speaks about high-tech education at the State of the Union address. | Source: YouTube


"In an unprecedented commitment for the company, Apple has pledged $100 million in iPads, MacBooks, and other products along with content and professional development to enrich learning in disadvantaged schools," the White House said in a release announcing the contributions.

President Obama formally announced Apple's contribution alongside similar donations from AT&T, Sprint, Verizon, and Microsoft on Tuesday afternoon. Apple's participation in the program first came to light last week during Obama's State of the Union address.

At the time, Apple said in a statement that they were "proud to join President Obama in this historic initiative to transform America's schools" and that "Apple has a long history in education, and we have pledged to contribute MacBooks, iPads, software and our expertise to support the ConnectED project."

The ConnectED program was unveiled by the White House last June, with partial funding to come from the FCC's existing E-Rate program which provides discounted telecommunications services to schools and libraries. Additional funds would come from donations and partnerships with American telecom and technology companies like Apple.

Joining Apple in the initiative are AT&T, Autodesk, Microsoft, O'Reilly Media, Sprint, and Verizon. Together, the companies will contribute more than $750 million to kickstart program, while the FCC will provide $2 billion through E-Rate and the Department of Agriculture will add another $10 million in grants.

  • Apple - Pledged $100 million in iPads, MacBooks, and other products along with content and professional development tools to enrich learning in disadvantaged schools.

  • AT&T - Pledged over $100 million to provide middle-school students free Internet connectivity for educational devices over their wireless network for three years.

  • Autodesk - Pledged to expand the company's "Design the Future" program to be available to every secondary school in the country - offering for free over $250 million in value.

  • Microsoft - Committed to launch a substantial affordability program open to all U.S. public schools by deeply discounting the price of its Windows operating system, which will substantially bring down the cost of Windows-based devices.

  • O'Reilly Media - Partnering with Safari Books Online to make over $100 million in educational content and tools available, for free, to every school in America.

  • Sprint - Committed to offer free wireless service for up to 50,000 low-income high school students over the next four years, valued at $100 million.

  • Verizon - Announced a multi-year program to support the ConnectED vision through up to $100 million in cash and in-kind commitments.
post #2 of 16
Watch AAPL stockholders and analysts complain about "losing" $100M of "their" money to kids. They'll find a way to crush Apple for doing something really good with their extra cash.
post #3 of 16

Well done, Apple. Thank you. You are a class act, as always.

post #4 of 16

It's about time Apple gave something back in the form of charity.  As an Apple shareholder, I certainly approve of it.  They can give back even more as far as I'm concerned.  Apple is such a tight-fisted company, sitting on a mountain of wealth and keeping it in the bank for themselves isn't right.  At least put it to some good use if they don't want to give it to shareholders or grow the company.  It's really difficult to understand Apple's management because they never tell anyone what their long-term goals are for the company.  Apple has such a lousy reputation as a company and maybe a bit of good will might help improve their image somewhat.  Apple should come up with some plan where a certain amount of money is given to charitable organizations every year relative to how much the company is profiting.  Contributions to education and medical research would be a good place to start.  For a company of Apple's wealth $100 million is a drop in the bucket.  They could easily afford to double or triple that amount.  Apple added about $10 billion in reserve cash to its personal piggy bank this last financial quarter.

post #5 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by rob53 View Post

Watch AAPL stockholders and analysts complain about "losing" $100M of "their" money to kids. They'll find a way to crush Apple for doing something really good with their extra cash.

They aren't donating any money. They're donating product and services which could have retailed for up to $100M. That's the smarter way and more common way to do it too. You get the publicity and goodwill while still getting your own product into schools that otherwise may have done without, or perhaps budget-wise have chosen a solution from a competitor.
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post #6 of 16
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Originally Posted by GregInPrague View Post
 

Would it be unreasonable to expect the government to take some positive action to reduce the crazy current tax implications on repatriating overseas earned income when Apple does generous things like this?

 

Yes, it would be unreasonable. There is no crazy tax implications for bringing home the money. The tax is reasonable. Companies like Apple benefit tremendously from the vast amounts of money the US spends overseas forcing its trade polices on the rest of the world. 

 

Charity is just that charity. You should not expect something in turn. Apple will get a tax write off from this generous gift, and it will expose people to its products that otherwise might not have access. Plus it creates goodwill. 

post #7 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by TBell View Post
 

 

Yes, it would be unreasonable. There is no crazy tax implications for bringing home the money. The tax is reasonable. Companies like Apple benefit tremendously from the vast amounts of money the US spends overseas forcing its trade polices on the rest of the world. 

 

Can you give any source to remotely quantify these "vast amounts of money" or how that money tangibly benefits Apple?

post #8 of 16

Our military makes international shipping safe, for instance. The list goes on...

post #9 of 16
That's very generous of Apple and all the others. I wonder if Microsoft had any tablets over that Africa didn't want and are now gifting those. If they do it would be of great value; this way they can learn how NOT to design something. Both HW and SW wise.
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post #10 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post

That's very generous of Apple and all the others. I wonder if Microsoft had any tablets over that Africa didn't want and are now gifting those. If they do it would be of great value; this way they can learn how NOT to design something. Both HW and SW wise.

According to the announcement MS is giving nothing except a discounted rate on their software to schools.  That's a good way to hang onto their Office monopoly that is of dwindling importance.  (My kids school have them use Google tools for their writing assignments for example).

post #11 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by malax View Post

According to the announcement MS is giving nothing except a discounted rate on their software to schools.

That's one way to report high usage numbers. Still, pathetic.
Quote:
My kids school have them use Google tools for their writing assignments for example.

I'd move my kids to a different school because of this. But that's just me.
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post #12 of 16

Last week when the first news story about ConnectED was posted, I tried a Google search for "ConnectED" but since it is a real word all I got was stuff with connected in the title but not the Obama initiative. Now when you search for "ConnectED" apparently Google has fine-tuned their search algorithm to notice the upper case "ED" so it works.

 

Just don't search for "ConnectED initiative Google" because that doesn't work. I just wanted to find out if Google had made a pledge to the program - apparently not.

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post #13 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Constable Odo View Post

It's about time Apple gave something back in the form of charity.  As an Apple shareholder, I certainly approve of it.  They can give back even more as far as I'm concerned.  Apple is such a tight-fisted company, sitting on a mountain of wealth and keeping it in the bank for themselves isn't right.  At least put it to some good use if they don't want to give it to shareholders or grow the company.  It's really difficult to understand Apple's management because they never tell anyone what their long-term goals are for the company.  Apple has such a lousy reputation as a company and maybe a bit of good will might help improve their image somewhat.  Apple should come up with some plan where a certain amount of money is given to charitable organizations every year relative to how much the company is profiting.  Contributions to education and medical research would be a good place to start.  For a company of Apple's wealth $100 million is a drop in the bucket.  They could easily afford to double or triple that amount.  Apple added about $10 billion in reserve cash to its personal piggy bank this last financial quarter.

Apple has been doing corporate donation matching since Tim Cook took over as CEO. That is in addition to the Product RED campaign, which they are the largest contributor to. Doing more is always better, but to say that they aren't doing any, is flat out wrong.
post #14 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

Just don't search for "ConnectED initiative Google" because that doesn't work. I just wanted to find out if Google had made a pledge to the program - apparently not.

I'm a bit surprised Google hasn't contributed to this effort too. They have a good history of donating product and services for worthy causes including schools and education in general. I'd consider this certainly worthy. Perhaps they weren't invited to participate, seeing as Microsoft is heavily committed to it. 1biggrin.gif
Edited by Gatorguy - 2/4/14 at 12:14pm
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post #15 of 16
Eh. What is MS actually doing?
post #16 of 16

Don't worry guys obama hooks up apple with more than a hundred millions in tax savings. just doing business indirectly.

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