or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › General › General Discussion › Rumor: Apple hires 'sleep expert' from Philips Research for iWatch project
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Rumor: Apple hires 'sleep expert' from Philips Research for iWatch project

post #1 of 29
Thread Starter 
A report on Tuesday claims Apple has made another hire for its so-called "iWatch" project, this time a sleep expert from Philips Research who could transform the wearable into proactive monitoring device.

Raymann
Photo showing sleep science patient believed to be Dr. Roy Raymann. | Roy Raymann via Twitter


In a possible addition to the rumored iWatch team, Apple recently took on Dr. Roy J.E.M. Raymann, a scientist who has contributed a great deal of literature and research to the field of sleep studies, according to 9to5Mac.

It should be noted that AppleInsider was not able to confirm Raymann's move to Apple, and as such offers the following strictly for purposes of discussion.

On his LinkedIn profile, Raymann describes himself as an "Expert on Sleep Research, Ambulatory Monitoring, Psychophysiology, Performance Measures, Thermoregulation, Circadian Physiology and Sleep Enhancement." He has worked with various sensor technologies that can monitor sleep behaviors and applied his research to treat sleep disorders.

For example, Raymann has experimented and wrote scientific papers on various methods and approaches to sleep modification such as thermoregulation and light treatment, the latter of which is heavily promoted by Philips.

Raymann left Philips in early January and also stepped down from his post on the Dutch Society for Sleep-Wake Research's (NSWO) scientific committee. During his time at the Dutch-based company, Raymann was part of a number of initiatives relating to the treatment of sleep disorders. Examples include project lead on sleep and thermoregulation; a supervisory role in power napping, GSR and sleep, vigilance and light exposure; founder of the Philips Sleep Experience Laboratory.

As for his background in wearables, Raymann worked for think tank TNO prior to his stint at Philips. During his time as a scientist at TNO Defense, Raymann conducted research on thermoregulation and wearable physiological sensors as applied to athletes and soldiers. In addition, he conducted studies to help protect against frostbite, offer thermal comfort in extreme environmental conditions and find ways to sleep in the cold.

With a healthy background in sleep monitoring and non-pharmacological sleep behavior modification, Raymann would be an interest addition to Apple's rumored health initiative, which could come as soon as iOS 8.

A number of fitness and health trackers already have devices on the market that monitor sleep patterns, but none actually alter how a user sleeps. While mere speculation, it is possible that a wearable device could continually monitor a user and sound alerts or vibrate to modify unwanted sleep patterns.
post #2 of 29
If all of these people are only being hired now, don't expect an "iWatch" or "iBand" or whatever any time soon.

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

Reply

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

Reply
post #3 of 29
As the image in the article clearly illustrates there will be no iWatch. Instead there will be a number of sensors strategically positioned that will communicate with your iPhone and the new iWatch app. It will look nothing like the mess of cables in the photo however. Apple will summon its best designers to resolve the usability issue. Expect the suite of iUndergarments to be launched this spring.
post #4 of 29
something tells me this will be a health device more than anything..
post #5 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by paxman View Post

(snip)
Expect the suite of iUndergarments to be launched this spring.

 

"They're magical."

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

Reply

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

Reply
post #6 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by jpmia View Post

something tells me this will be a health device more than anything..

 

It makes sense that the focus of this product is something thats not currently being offered... Why buy a device to read text messages from our other device?

post #7 of 29

Apple is really smart on this.

 

The first goal towards good heath is a good night's sleep.

 

Then diet and then exercise.

 

If one can achieve positive results in these three areas, physical and mental health are more likely.

 

Not assured, but more likely. But it all starts with a good night's sleep! :)

 

Best.

post #8 of 29

Not necessarily. Apple has some pretty smart engineers and they could have a lot of the groundwork already laid. For instance, the hardware and basic software and maybe even the apps. They may be adding these experts to review their work and test the final output and put the final stamp of approval on it. Apple also tends to start with a core set of functionality in the initial product and then extend from there. The experts would also allow for more advanced features.  They *could* be in the alpha or even early internal beta of the product.

 

Also, Apple would need to announce the product and build excitement.  They may also want to give developers time to update or create apps that work with it. Announce in March and start selling in summer.

post #9 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by jpmia View Post

something tells me this will be a health device more than anything..

 

Ditto.  The more I learn about this project, the more I think it is a truly good one.

post #10 of 29

I can see the concept of the Apple wearable more clearly now. Where others have envisaged a screen on the wrist that duplicates what is happening to the phone in your pocket the Apple wearable will give your iOS devices insight into what is happening inside your body. Imagine future iOS devices doing situational and context-aware computing. Options like "do not disturb" could have a setting that turns it on/off when you are asleep/awake.

post #11 of 29

I should also say, they may have hired exports that hold patents to avoid litigation and use that expertise solely in their products.

post #12 of 29

The thing people have misunderstood about the "iWatch" is the meaning of the word "watch".  

post #13 of 29

Quote:

 

 

Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post
 

 

"They're magical."

 

LDS filing lawsuit in 3 - 2 - 1..

post #14 of 29

I might consider version 2 of whatever it is.

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

Reply

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

Reply
post #15 of 29
Think hospital, care faculties as well as individuals. The addressable market is wide ranging.
post #16 of 29
I think they will go with iband. Just a hunch.
post #17 of 29
Now if this watch stops my snoring, it is a done deal.

And if Apple opens it up for developers, who knows what can happen? I hope there will be an app that brings breakfast to my bed just in time when I wake up. And I hope it does exercise for me, so I won't have to.

But seriously: It is genuinely exciting to watch what direction Apple is heading. Very interested in the result. This project is the only thing stopping me from buying a pebble.
post #18 of 29

Apple has been hiring these professionals in the last few YEARS.

 

I know that this isn't Samsung insider, but it think that some of you should that a look at recent Samsung rumors (I saw it at Android central). Basically, a new app for the S5 was spotted. It is called S-health, and it has a flatter UI. Not flat like Windows phone or anything Google does, it really is an iOS app, design-wise. Why am I saying this?

 

Yes, Samsung can do as they please, but it is shameful. Remember the golden S4 when the iPhone 5S golden was in the news every single day? I know that they took a it this quarter, but bringing the S5 ahead of planned and focussing on this stuff in light of these rumors... It's just low-level. Especially since it's a useless app, they just want the news about it.

post #19 of 29
I still say it's an array of sensors in a ring. It may be a 1/2 thick ring, but a ring it'll be. No one wants to sleep with their watch on. Then again, it could go on the ankle, or even around the calf...
post #20 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by pedromartins View Post

Apple has been hiring these professionals in the last few YEARS.

I know that this isn't Samsung insider, but it think that some of you should that a look at recent Samsung rumors (I saw it at Android central). Basically, a new app for the S5 was spotted. It is called S-health, and it has a flatter UI. Not flat like Windows phone or anything Google does, it really is an iOS app, design-wise. Why am I saying this?

Yes, Samsung can do as they please, but it is shameful. Remember the golden S4 when the iPhone 5S golden was in the news every single day? I know that they took a it this quarter, but bringing the S5 ahead of planned and focussing on this stuff in light of these rumors... It's just low-level. Especially since it's a useless app, they just want the news about it.

Samsung S-Health was launched in 2012 on Samsung Galaxy S III.

No doubt that Apple will be accused of copying.
post #21 of 29
Imagine...

Angry Birds Blood Pressure Monitor

Minecraft Muscle-Builder Edition

Facebook Skin Cancer Early Detection Kit

Candy Crush Blood Glucose Monitor

The possibilities are endless!

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

Reply

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

Reply
post #22 of 29
Unwanted sleep patterns? You mean living in a country that believes sleep doesn't matter to human health? The country where the phrase "a lack of sleep never killed anyone" (which is false) is the automatic corporate response to employees suffering lack of sleep due to their employment hours and stress. The country where they throw drugs at you which destroy quality of sleep instead of solving the problem (the problem is lack of deep sleep, not getting unconscious). The country where quality of sleep isn't even understood as a thing.

The problem is institutional. Not individual. You cannot solve a socially created epidemic by covering the symptoms in the individuals least tolerant of the toxic lifestyle. That's why the rest of us are called lazy and weak, rather than called victims of inhuman expectations and demands.

But there's no room for being human in the wage slave pits of unfettered American capitalism.
post #23 of 29

Karl? Is that you?

 

Just kidding.  I think you may be over-exaggerating and generalizing all American businesses into this stereotype.  First, if you really aren't getting enough sleep because of your job, you can always quit said job. No one is making you stay in that particular job. If you are stuck in a low paying job that makes you work long hours... then don't work there and demand something better. The reason employers pay so little is because the supply is high and demand is low. But if everyone demanded a higher wage instead of settling for working for peanuts, well the minimum wage would increase. Instead, people settle for it.  It could be that they aren't really worth much as an employee. If you don't like that, get some education and demand more and realize that if you don't, you will be replaced by robots soon.

 

Of course the other side of the equation is called "living within your means".  My parents didn't make a lot of money growing up but they supported us and even managed to save a little for us to get into college. No we didn't have cable TV, multiple Xboxes or lived in a big house. But what we did was work together and became more than what our situation predicted. We didn't look to the government to bail us out and we didn't blame others... we took responsibility for our own lives.  My mother grew up in a barn (literally) and didn't have running water. I can see now how hard work and not settling for being a victim allowed her, and my father too, to rise up out of that situation.

 

So stop blaming others for exploiting you or whatever and take control over the world around you. This is difference between the rich and the poor. Think and act beyond your situation.

post #24 of 29
Originally Posted by dysamoria View Post
Unwanted sleep patterns? You mean living in a country that believes sleep doesn't matter to human health?

 

No, your fantasy has absolutely nothing to do with what we’re discussing, thanks. Bye.

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply
post #25 of 29
Sleep? Reading all these rumors about an "iWatch" is more sleep-inducing that counting sheep. I'll pay attention after Apple issues invitations to an "iWatch event."

Sent from my iPhone Simulator

Reply

Sent from my iPhone Simulator

Reply
post #26 of 29
Originally Posted by dysamoria View Post

But there's no room for being human in the wage slave pits of unfettered American capitalism.

 

The average American worker's lifestyle is bourgeois-cushy compared to the average Japanese salaryman's lifestyle.

Ever hear the term "karoshi"?  It's Japanese for "death from overwork".

I've worked in Japan, and yes, it's a real thing there.

Sent from my iPhone Simulator

Reply

Sent from my iPhone Simulator

Reply
post #27 of 29

  That is definitely the case now.  But that could change with Apple doing something extraordinary with this new invention, (if it will do half the things they are saying it will do).

  Present time, employers push for workers to do more at work.  And they care less if you are sleep deprived or completely exhausted because of keeping up with the work they pile on you.   Surely they make people think and feel that if they cannot "keep up" or "produce", there is always somebody else that can and might replace you.   So most employees have to put up with all the stress.

  But if the"iWhatever", has enough sensors that show how worn out you are because of all the stress you suffer because of the "extra hours" or "mental anguish" that should not come with you fulfilling your employment as stated on day of hire.  I would think that the record showing that on a "scientifically approved" apparatus, might be enough for an employee to go to a Lawyer and legally have enough grounds for a malpractice suit of some kind. 

post #28 of 29

Those who think that the photo depicts something bizarre should be aware that the sensors are important to diagnose sleep disorders such as sleep apnea, a surprisingly common yet unrecognized condition with consequences that can range from mild to life-threatening. Because of the present sensory and analytical regimen, sleep studies such as the one shown are generally conducted overnight in a controlled clinical environment rather than at home in the study subject's own bed. A combination of bluetooth wireless sensors and an iPhone data recording app could have a major impact on both the convenience in obtaining information and in reducing sleep study costs, which typically run into the four figures for a single overnight diagnostic session.

 

Here are some statistics from the Epidemiology section of the Wikipedia article article on sleep apnea. Forgive the pun, but they're nothing to "sneeze at."

 

***

 

"The Wisconsin Sleep Cohort Study estimated in 1993 that roughly one in every 15 Americans was affected by at least moderate sleep apnea.[54][55] It also estimated that in middle-age as many as nine percent of women and 24 percent of men were affected, undiagnosed and untreated.[54][55][56]

"The costs of untreated sleep apnea reach further than just health issues. It is estimated that in the U.S. the average untreated sleep apnea patient's annual health care costs $1,336 more than an individual without sleep apnea. This may cause $3.4 billion/year in additional medical costs. Whether medical cost savings occur with treatment of sleep apnea remains to be determined.[57]"

I admit to being a Fanatical Moderate. I Disdain the Inane. Vyizderzominymororzizazizdenderizorziz?

Reply

I admit to being a Fanatical Moderate. I Disdain the Inane. Vyizderzominymororzizazizdenderizorziz?

Reply
post #29 of 29
In addition to the athlete applications, I envision is a device that will be constantly monitoring all of you vital signs and if anything such as blood sugar drops, irregular heartbeat, breathing problems are detected then the device could call 911 and your doctor and send health data automatically to the paramedics before they even arrive. Imagine how many older adults would want something like that.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Discussion
AppleInsider › Forums › General › General Discussion › Rumor: Apple hires 'sleep expert' from Philips Research for iWatch project