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Samsung wants Olympians to hide the Apple logo on their iPhones during opening ceremonies

post #1 of 152
Thread Starter 
Samsung is giving a free Galaxy Note 3 to every athlete competing in the 2014 Winter Olympics, but?those who receive one are reportedly required to ensure that the Apple logo is nowhere to be seen if they use an iPhone to record events at the opening ceremonies.

iPhone


Olympians have increasingly turned to smartphones to capture photos and video of the festivities, and the handsets are often caught by television cameras covering the event. Samsung wants to ensure its brand is the only one seen, according to a report from Slashgear.

Samsung's plan was outed by members of the Swiss Olympic team, who noticed the guidelines inserted into the athletes' gift bags.

The Olympics provide an unparalleled advertising opportunity, with television coverage spanning the globe. Though figures for 2014 are unknown, it is thought that Samsung spent at least $100 million to sponsor the 2012 Summer Olympics in London.

Samsung's Sochi Olympics iPhone ban


Under the headline "iPhone forbidden at Olympics opening ceremony," the image above is captioned, "If Beat Feuz had an iPhone and wanted to take photos of the Olympics opening ceremony, he'd have to cover the Apple logo."

Swiss website Watson.ch (in German, Google Translate) notes that Samsung is giving Winter Olympic Games athletes a free Galaxy Note 3, tied to the requirement that they must cover up the Apple logos on their iPhones when appearing on TV.

A parallel report by Bluewin.ch (in German, Google Translate) similarly noted that, as a requirement for gifts received, 'any athletes attending the opening ceremony and taking photos or videos with a competing product would need to cover up the Apple logo.'

Samsung's expensive promotions running into failure



Last year alone, Samsung spent $14 billion on marketing, a figure that investors have targeted as extravagantly excessive. But even as the company works to reduce its marketing expenses, Samsung is struggling with expensive sponsorships where celebrities have put their free Galaxy back in the box to use iPhones.

At the last Summer Olympics, Samsung signed an "exclusive agreement with David Beckham to be its global brand ambassador for the London 2012 Olympic Games," but Beckham was, embarrassingly for Samsung, just spotted using his iPhone 5s at the Super Bowl.

David Beckham back to iPhone after Samsung sponsorship


Samsung has regularly experienced difficulty in avoiding embarrassment after key sponsors continued using iOS devices, most notably via Twitter. In December, Samsung launched a "Galaxy 11" fantasy soccer team campaign that was intended to go viral, but instead went awry when star team manager Franz Beckenbauer tweeted out Samsung's prepared remarks from his iPhone.

In October, T-Mobile chief executive John Legere intended to use Twitter to direct attention to Samsung Mobile's latest Note 3 phablet and the company's Galaxy Gear watch accessory, but inadvertently did so via his iPhone 5s.

Last spring, Samsung's sponsored Spanish tennis star David Ferrer tweeted out ostensible satisfaction with his #GalaxyS4 and stated that he was "configuring S Health on my new #GalaxyS4 to help with training @SamsungMobile," albeit from his iPhone.
post #2 of 152
Perhaps Samsung understands the disconnect between the metrics of products shipped vs those in actual daily use. Otherwise, they should be expecting that a late majority of all phones in use at the Olympics would be theirs anyway... -
post #3 of 152
sniff sniff sniff

What's that I smell?

Oh... it's desperation.
na na na na na...
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na na na na na...
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post #4 of 152
Give me a break. Is Samsung paying the athletes (never would have been allowed years ago) I could see them requiring this (same as on TV shows) bit if they are only giving athletes a (junk) gift box first I would give it back and second, I would challenge their apparent authority to ban other products.
post #5 of 152

Surprise surprise.  Samsung does something shady?  Come on, it can't be so, LOL.

post #6 of 152
Quote:
Originally Posted by rob53 View Post

Give me a break. Is Samsung paying the athletes (never would have been allowed years ago) I could see them requiring this (same as on TV shows) bit if they are only giving athletes a (junk) gift box first I would give it back and second, I would challenge their apparent authority to ban other products.

 

A "free" Galaxy Note 3 is being "given" to every athlete.

 

It seems they are neither free or given if these conditions are imposed.

Better than my Bose, better than my Skullcandy's, listening to Mozart through my LeBron James limited edition PowerBeats by Dre is almost as good as my Sennheisers.
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Better than my Bose, better than my Skullcandy's, listening to Mozart through my LeBron James limited edition PowerBeats by Dre is almost as good as my Sennheisers.
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post #7 of 152
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jack Baker View Post
 

Surprise surprise.  Samsung does something shady?  Come on, it can't be so, LOL.

This is pretty much a standard when a company is a sponsor.   TV shows do it all the time.  Soda cans have the labels facing away from the camera if a rival manufacturer is a sponsor of the show/network.

post #8 of 152

Oh yes, because when people see a tall, thin phone with the middle logo covered, no one EVER thinks that it's an iPhone! When I notice products with covered logos in TV shows,etc. it, frankly, raises my awareness. It doesn't lower it.

post #9 of 152

Samsung should give away free iPhone cases to all athletes so that apple logos is covered. That would be pretty funny. 

post #10 of 152
Quote:
Originally Posted by mistercow View Post
 

This is pretty much a standard when a company is a sponsor.   TV shows do it all the time.  Soda cans have the labels facing away from the camera if a rival manufacturer is a sponsor of the show/network.

 

Sponsor of a specific athlete maybe, in a commercial, professional sport.

 

The Olympics originally started with ideals above these, oh well money talks.

Better than my Bose, better than my Skullcandy's, listening to Mozart through my LeBron James limited edition PowerBeats by Dre is almost as good as my Sennheisers.
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Better than my Bose, better than my Skullcandy's, listening to Mozart through my LeBron James limited edition PowerBeats by Dre is almost as good as my Sennheisers.
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post #11 of 152
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post
Samsung spent at least $100 million to sponsor the 2012 Summer Olympics in London.

 

Really! I live and work in London and had direct dealings with the Olympics. Samsung sponsoring is news to me, I don't remember seeing any advertising. Maybe I'm Samsung blind.

post #12 of 152
Quote:
Originally Posted by island hermit View Post

sniff sniff sniff

What's that I smell?

Oh... it's desperation.

I agree, and here's why: Samsung already sells more handsets than Apple. It is a completely unnecessary and trashy move.

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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post #13 of 152

Is this a cultural thing?

 

Is this how South Koreans conduct themselves?

 

I know that it *seems* like the ebb and and flow of cutthroat competition, but stuff like this doesn't make Samsung look good - obviously. Do they not realize this??

 

Hope someone can answer. 

post #14 of 152

Huh, and what happens if the athletes simply ignore the logo-covering "requirement"? Oh, have to give back the "free" Note 3 maybe? Aw... 

 

Trying to imagine a) what a pita it would be to insure that my everyday recording device has its logo covered while competing in and/or running around the OLYMPICS and b) how "uncool" it will undoubtedly look running around with a piece of tape covering the back of my swank iPhone, and c) What do I need with a Note 3 when I have my iPhone?

 

Does Samsung really believe they're gaining any cachet with these people by essentially telling them they have to hide a device that they like? It spits in the face of their own tastes. Brilliant move, Samsung.

 

Samsung thinks that by giving one to EVERY competitor (along with these 'display restrictions') they can prevent Apple getting any 'free advertising'.....? Some clever person in their company actually believed the cost of thousands of Note 3s would equal the 'damage' done to Apple this way (assuming everyone plays ball). That somehow the world "perception" will be that Apple is nowhere and Samsung is king? A faked, lying, "created" perception? Is that all they have?

 

The millions of spectators flashing Apple logos on TV while recording their favorite events will so outweigh images of the occasional athlete raising a logo-covered device (but still obviously an Apple iPhone, logo or not) that frankly, it'll be a pointless exercise, one that only ends up making them look bad, one that smacks of petty, underhanded snark than "competing".

 

I really dislike Samsung's "culture". Despise it really. 

 

They make what seem to be pretty good TVs, and yet, I won't buy one. Mainly because of silly crap like this. It creates serious trust and credibility issues for me. I don't trust the products when I can't trust the company.


Edited by tribalogical - 2/5/14 at 12:36pm
post #15 of 152

Just put a sticker over the logo that says

 

CENSORED

by

Samsung

post #16 of 152
Can you imagine the uproar if Apple was to do something akin to this at an event meant to promote fairness? The NY Times and the Wall St. Journal would have put their exposure on page one. As it is, someone on the city desk will assume Samsung needs a handicap because their $20 billion annual promotional budget can't possibly compete with Apple's massive $1 Billion.
post #17 of 152

This reminds me of when Reebok was a sponsor at the 1992 Summer Olympics; the men's basketball team (half of them had Nike endorsements) decided to unzip their warm up jackets when accepting the gold medal so the Reebok patch wasn't visible. 

 

Michael Jordan, of course one of Nike's most prominent sponsored athletes, draped an American flag over his shoulder to make sure that the Reebok patch was covered. 

 

Nike got at least as much PR as Reebok did -- without having to pay the money to be a sponsor!

 

It'll be interesting to hear public opinion once this Samsung directive becomes more well-known. Apple = Nike in this case, and I'll bet that Apple will get as much publicity as Samsung... And they won't spend a penny to do so. (edit: Apple will get more positive publicity than Samsung here).


Edited by smackdown - 2/5/14 at 12:39pm
post #18 of 152
Mac Rumors reports "All accredited competitors, coaches, trainers and officials are required to abide by Rule 40 of the Olympic Charter, preventing athletes from mentioning any non-Olympic sponsor companies. Athletes breaking Rule 40 can be punished with "removal of accreditation and financial penalties" or even total disqualification."

If in fact, Rule 40 is the regulation being used to enforce the Apple logo ban, I would doubt any credible Olympian who might possibly end up on the podium will dare defy this directive. Who'd want to risk disqualification for the sake of making a point?
post #19 of 152
Quote:
Originally Posted by mistercow View Post
 

This is pretty much a standard when a company is a sponsor.   TV shows do it all the time.  Soda cans have the labels facing away from the camera if a rival manufacturer is a sponsor of the show/network.


Right.  But this is, above everything else, an athletic event.  Not a television show!  The athletes are not actors.  They are athletes.  (Ath-uh-letes, for the meat-heads.)  Next thing, the athletes will be expected to hide their non-Sammy watches, too. 

post #20 of 152

All they need to do cover the logo with the biggest piece of dayglow tape they can. Make the cover up as conspicuous as possible, for under the day glow tape beats the heart of innovation and quality, Apple. It's so good, rivals are even afraid of the logo.

post #21 of 152

Accept the Samsung phone and use it for the Olympics, but make sure you plaster a big Apple logo on it.

post #22 of 152
Quote:
Originally Posted by smackdown View Post
 

This reminds me of when Reebok was a sponsor at the 1992 Summer Olympics; the men's basketball team (half of them had Nike endorsements) decided to unzip their warm up jackets when accepting the gold medal so the Reebok patch wasn't visible. 

 

Michael Jordan, of course one of Nike's most prominent sponsored athletes, draped an American flag over his shoulder to make sure that the Reebok patch was covered. 

 

Nike got at least as much PR as Reebok did -- without having to pay the money to be a sponsor!

 

It'll be interesting to hear public opinion once this Samsung directive becomes more well-known. Apple = Nike in this case, and I'll bet that Apple will get as much publicity as Samsung... And they won't spend a penny to do so. (edit: Apple will get more positive publicity than Samsung here).

 

 

There was a case in England soccer where a foreign player (dont remember who) under contract with Addidas was forbidden by the team (whose equipement supplier was Nike) to display the 3 angled bands even if he could play  with the shoes. No problem, he added a fourth band in red !

 

The requirement was dropped next match. Apple should do the same, using eg a pear shaped sticker in a fluo color !

post #23 of 152
Quote:
Originally Posted by hill60 View Post
 

A "free" Galaxy Note 3 is being "given" to every athlete.

 

And here come the twittey/facedbook postings: 

"Here I am at the Olympic Games and having a great time with my Galxy Note 3!"

"--sent from my iPhone."

post #24 of 152

Since today's news is rife with reports that EVERY device with wireless capability (cellular, WiFi, Bluetooth) is almost certain to be hacked in Russia and especially Sochi, it would be prudent for visitors - including Apple device owners - to avoid bringing any of their own devices with them at all. If athletes are offered free Galaxies, by Samsung, fine. Take photos perhaps with them, but avoid using them as a communications device or to access existing personal information or data.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=waEeJJVZ5P8

 

http://abcnews.go.com/Blotter/sochi-threat-russian-spies-mobsters-hacking-smartphones/story?id=22361222


Edited by Kibitzer - 2/5/14 at 12:58pm

I admit to being a Fanatical Moderate. I Disdain the Inane. Vyizderzominymororzizazizdenderizorziz?

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I admit to being a Fanatical Moderate. I Disdain the Inane. Vyizderzominymororzizazizdenderizorziz?

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post #25 of 152
Quote:
Originally Posted by Felix01 View Post

Mac Rumors reports "All accredited competitors, coaches, trainers and officials are required to abide by Rule 40 of the Olympic Charter, preventing athletes from mentioning any non-Olympic sponsor companies. Athletes breaking Rule 40 can be punished with "removal of accreditation and financial penalties" or even total disqualification."

If in fact, Rule 40 is the regulation being used to enforce the Apple logo ban, I would doubt any credible Olympian who might possibly end up on the podium will dare defy this directive. Who'd want to risk disqualification for the sake of making a point?

 

Alright, I hadn't considered this. Mea culpa. This makes more sense. 

 

So am I correct in assuming that this explains Samsung's order? Is there a relationship between the two?

post #26 of 152
Quote:
Originally Posted by tikiman View Post

Oh yes, because when people see a tall, thin phone with the middle logo covered, no one EVER thinks that it's an iPhone! When I notice products with covered logos in TV shows,etc. it, frankly, raises my awareness. It doesn't lower it.

Usually when a logo is covered is because the show/network wasn't paid to promote the company, not because they have anything against them, but you're absolutely correct, most times one can tell what the product is that they're attempting to hide.
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"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
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"Few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example" Mark Twain
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
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post #27 of 152

I propose the following instead:

 

Old Olympic Logo:

 

 

 

New Olympic Logo:

 

I always appreciate an Android fan who puts his energy into advertising Apple products.
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I always appreciate an Android fan who puts his energy into advertising Apple products.
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post #28 of 152

Doesn't this violate some/any Olympics rules on corporate sponsorship and/or fair play?!

post #29 of 152
Quote:
Originally Posted by GTR View Post

I propose the following instead:

Old Olympic Logo:





New Olympic Logo:


Come on, would it have been too much work to color the Apple logos to match the rings?
post #30 of 152
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

Doesn't this violate some/any Olympics rules on corporate sponsorship and/or fair play?!
The Olympics has been a corporate cash cow for years. So no.

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post #31 of 152
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

Doesn't this violate some/any Olympics rules on corporate sponsorship and/or fair play?!
Doubt it. When the Olympics were in Vancouver, Visa was a sponsor. You couldn't use any other credit card to buy tickets to events. Pissed me off as my MC has a higher limit since I use it more which meant I could only try to get tickets for a couple events before I maxed out.
post #32 of 152

This seems pretty normal to me for the Olympics. Promotional Sponsors are gold at these events, so this is expected. Any cell phone maker who sponsored the Olympics would have had similar requests, this one just happens to be Samsung.

 

Granted, Apple probably couldn't have cared less about logos and competitors if they were the sponsor. It's not very Apple-like.

post #33 of 152
Quote:
Originally Posted by EricTheHalfBee View Post

Doubt it. When the Olympics were in Vancouver, Visa was a sponsor. You couldn't use any other credit card to buy tickets to events. Pissed me off as my MC has a higher limit since I use it more which meant I could only try to get tickets for a couple events before I maxed out.

Posted my question before I saw Post #18 above....

post #34 of 152

The solution is simple.

Samsung should provide stickers in the gift bag that athletes can use to cover the Apple logo.

 

 

 

I suggest they use these:

 

post #35 of 152

This is a non-issue.  You see this all the time on the medal stand when an athlete sponsored by one company (Nike, for instance) covers the logo of the brand that provides official Olympic garb to the national team (Adidas, say).  They'll normally cover up with a flag, since patriotism trumps commercialism, but make no mistake...they aren't going to be caught peddling a competitor's wares in front of billions of people.

post #36 of 152
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crowley View Post
The Olympics has been a corporate cash cow for years. So no.

 

Indeed.

In London long established restaurants with the word "Olympic" in the name were forced to change their name during the summer olympics.

I believe they also will not even consider an olympic venue unless they are exempt from any taxes by the various governing taxing authorities (I may be mistaken—but it's either the olympics or the Wold Cup—likely both.)

post #37 of 152

And they all have to eat McDonalds too, right? Better setup some more portapoties.

post #38 of 152

If the length of their "commitment" to Samsung means just getting the Note, and nothing else... I wouldn't accept it.  I think it's embarrassing that a cheap, piece of crap phablet the the Note means you have to essentially inconvenience yourself during the opening ceremony.  Considering how much money that olympian invested over the years to get to the games, only to have some trash company give you junk and tell you what to do.  It's embarrassing. 

Now, if Samsung is sponsoring the entire games, that is an entirely different matter.  There's clearly historical actions taken from other sponsors in years past like Nike and Adidas.  What about folks like the media that may be using their MacBooks?  Must they cover those illuminated logos or does it just a apply to phones if the camera pans to someone at some box seat using a Mac?


Edited by sflocal - 2/5/14 at 1:50pm
post #39 of 152
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post

Is this a cultural thing?

Is this how South Koreans conduct themselves?
Yes it is cultural - one companies actions defines everyone in the country. Just like all Americans are fat, stupid, greedy, litigious, superficial and racist because there is some American company that embodies that trait.
post #40 of 152

DED using google translate :lol:

 

Why not use SIRI :smokey:

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