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Microsoft Office may come to iPad before Windows 8 - Page 2

post #41 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThePixelDoc View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

I don't think anyone, here, expects to develop a major spreadsheet design, or do mass data input on an iPad.

However, it is very valuable to be able to access a spreadsheet created elsewhere and make minor updates and changes at will.

In some situations, having up-to-date data means everything.

Pipped by @anantksundaram who said it better
While true it is immensely advantagious to be able to update a spreadsheet, but you also brought up the problem of VB macros... I'm also curious how they're going to implement that. Strictly embedded possibly with no editing of the Macro?

I've also wondered how it is that a number crunching program and sheets with 50k to even a 1mil. cells can be so much slower than say, "number crunching pixels" such as in Photoshop or FCPX. I often have PS layered files over a gig, and can still work and edit rather smoothly and in real time, not to mention FCPX.

It's all just ones and zeros, so any ideas or insight on that?

It's not the 1s and 0s that bother me – it's the loops!
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post #42 of 99

So they finally admit they are a Software company ?

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post #43 of 99
Excel was first developed for the Mac. And still is the best software Microsoft has ever written. Ever.
As much as I prefer Numbers the latest version is so dumbed down I hope apple gets their act together or I'll go back to using excel. Why, o why, can't I decide page breaks and headers or footers content as well as putting a logo in it? Why....
post #44 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post

Mac Office releases are staggered from Windows Office releases, so not unprecedented. And apps like Microsoft Word were available on Mac before the original Windows versions (DOS doesn't count).

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post
 

Sure, but they haven’t been staggered with Apple first since… well, the beginning.

 

In case anyone has doubts, SN & TS are both right. The quotes below are taken from Wikipedia:

 

"Microsoft released the first version of Excel for the Macintosh on September 30, 1985, and the first Windows version was 2.05 (to synchronize with the Macintosh version 2.2) in November 1987."

 

"In 1985, Microsoft ported Word to Mac OS…The first version of Word for Windows was released in 1989."

 

"Microsoft Office for Mac was introduced for Mac OS in 1989, before Office was released for Windows…Microsoft Office for Windows started in October 1990 as a bundle of three applications designed for Microsoft Windows 3.0"

 

Personally, I have always believed that the "Windows Everywhere!" philosophy would fail and that Microsoft should go back to its roots as a software company serving any OS that provided a market.

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post #45 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

Wow, a vague, oblique statement in a rumor-based article on a blog that says "...The purchase structure is also unknown, though Foley has heard it will likely require a subscription through Microsoft Office 365..." is enough for you to conclude that it'll cost "$99 per year."

Doesn't take much by way of actual data to get you to make categorical statements, does it?

I agree with him. If they stick tithe rental model it's not worth it
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post #46 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by dsuden View Post

Whether it's Office or iWork, the iPad has never struck me as a very good place to get much real work done.  I can work five times faster on a real laptop with keyboard and decent-sized screen.   As for spreadsheets on a 9" display (or Numbers for that matter), no thanks.  

Airplay it to you TV and use a BT keyboard?
post #47 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by dugbug View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

Wow, a vague, oblique statement in a rumor-based article on a blog that says "...The purchase structure is also unknown, though Foley has heard it will likely require a subscription through Microsoft Office 365..." is enough for you to conclude that it'll cost "$99 per year."

Doesn't take much by way of actual data to get you to make categorical statements, does it?

I agree with him. If they stick tithe rental model it's not worth it

Where did I say I disagree with that? I was simply making the -- I thought, obvious -- point that there is not enough information in the story to come to a categorical conclusion about pricing yet.
post #48 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThePixelDoc View Post

So can I assume you've never installed any Adobe Suites or programs? No excuses, just saying that MS isn't the only one that gets away with App install murder.

I did (and I actually checked the Photoshop folder when I wrote my comment). But in my totally unscientific approach it seemed to me that ms did worse.
post #49 of 99
The iPad would be useful for minor input of data on a field trip but serious data manipulation would happen on the home machine. In any case this is welcome for Apple.
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post #50 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

Okay, then what's the advantage?

Presumably they have a cloud advantage and a brand name. You are on a field trip and you can.

1) read your complex data for presentations or meetings.
2) write or input into cells where the data are uploaded to a cloud, downloaded to your desktop, and the macros do their work.
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post #51 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

If true, what does this tell us about the robustness of the Windows Mobile OS and the developer APIs/Tools vis a vis iOS?

Chrome was released for OS X one and a half years after the Windows release. And it sounds like the Windows build involved significantly more work since the developers had to basically build the whole sandboxing system from the ground up (http://arstechnica.com/apple/2009/06/google-sandboxing-for-chrome-on-mac-os-x-a-piece-of-cake/). What does that tell us about the robustness of Windows and Visual Studio compared to OS X and Xcode? 


Edited by d4NjvRzf - 2/15/14 at 7:25am
post #52 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by pedromartins View Post
 

Who cares. It will be slow, huge, difficult to use (same crappy UI especially for mobile?), expensive... It will only deserve as a direct comparison with iWork for iOS, so it will only increase iWork's value.

Originally Posted by justp1ayin View Post

I use Excel for work and Numbers at home, and I hate excel honestly. Way too cluttered.... Ill stick with my Numbers, and export to an Excel spreadsheet if need be.
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

Mmm...

If MS brings Excel to iOS:
  • Wouldn't they need to provide Macro [Programming] capability?
  • Aren't Excel Macros written in VBA (Visual Basic)?
  • Isn't Visual Basic a programming language?
  • Would Apple allow an app that includes a programming language on iOS?

Good summary of why a native iOS version of Microsoft Office will not work very well on a smaller device with a touch screen. Add the absolute necessity of increasing RAM and Apple would have to produce a larger, fatter iPad Pro just to get this overweight software to run properly. Throw away 90% of the marginally used "features" of Office and it might run and might be enough to actually compete wit iWork, but I doubt Microsoft could do this. As for needing all those macros (still the primary way of spreading viruses on Macs) in Excel, why not just provide the capability people have to program on their own? 

 

I won't use Office 365 or any other cloud-based productivity software (sorry Apple) because I need to be able to work when I don't have any kind of network connection.

post #53 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by d4NjvRzf View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

If true, what does this tell us about the robustness of the Windows Mobile OS and the developer APIs/Tools vis a vis iOS?
Chrome was released for OS X one and a half years after the Windows release. And it sounds like the Windows build involved significantly more work since the developers had to basically build the whole sandboxing system from the ground up (http://arstechnica.com/apple/2009/06/google-sandboxing-for-chrome-on-mac-os-x-a-piece-of-cake/). What does that tell us about the robustness of Windows and Visual Studio compared to OS X and Xcode? 

I'll spell it out for you...

It says that it is harder for Microsoft to upgrade a Microsoft app to run on a Microsoft OS/platform -- than it is for Microsoft to port a Microsoft app to an Apple OS/platform!

It's pretty obvious if you try...
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post #54 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by d4NjvRzf View Post

Chrome was released for OS X one and a half years after the Windows release. And it sounds like the Windows build involved significantly more work since the developers had to basically build the whole sandboxing system from the ground up (http://arstechnica.com/apple/2009/06/google-sandboxing-for-chrome-on-mac-os-x-a-piece-of-cake/). What does that tell us about the robustness of Windows and Visual Studio compared to OS X and Xcode? 

It tells us that, back then, OS X Xcode and obj c were minority persuits, with fewer expert devs and a smaller installed base. iOS vs Windows mobile is reversed.

By the way I think most devs would prefer C# and Visual Studio to the Android mess and eclipse. But -the installed base and the previous sunk cost of iOS and Android development works against them. I mean that's why MS are thinking of doing this.
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post #55 of 99
And hate on MS all you like they do dev tools well.
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post #56 of 99

I'll bet that Microsoft had their change of heart right after Apple updated iWork (or whatever the suite is called now) and made it free with all new macs & iOS devices. There are still problems with iWork, but now, with it free across the board, there is a lot less incentive to buy Office Mac, which is a nice little profit center for Microsoft. 

 

Numbers is the weakest of the three apps (in my opinion). For home use, the suite is pretty much good enough to replace Office, and it syncs with your iPad or iPhone. I think that in a lot of ways, Keynote is better than PowerPoint. Pages is almost as good as Word, for non-professional use. Numbers still has a ways to go, but you can do almost everything that a home user would need. There used to be a lot of problems syncing documents back & forth between the iOS & Mac versions, but since the updates, it has worked flawlessly for me.

 

I was one of the diehards that said I'll buy Office for iOS the day it comes out, but since the iWork update, I've had zero problems with it and I find that the ability to have my docs on my iPad outweighs the negatives of using Numbers, and I already own Office 2011 Mac, as well as every Office Mac iteration since I got my first Mac in the 90's. Honestly, I don't know that I will upgrade the next time. This new competitor has to worry MS on the home front. Every business is still going to buy Office for as long as it is made, but I don't think it's necessary any longer for home users. I'll bet MS wants to get Office on the iPad before more people figure that out. Honestly, if Office was on the iPad last year, I would have stuck with it & never given iWorks another try, but now that I'm used to the programs & their quirks, I'm fine with them. I'll continue to use Office at my work, but I haven't opened an MS program on my Mac since at leas the beginning of January, and I don't see myself going back. 

post #57 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

Mmm...

If MS brings Excel to iOS:
  • Wouldn't they need to provide Macro [Programming] capability?
  • Aren't Excel Macros written in VBA (Visual Basic)?
  • Isn't Visual Basic a programming language?
  • Would Apple allow an app that includes a programming language on iOS?

The current iOS SDK agreement would not permit VBA. But they don't have to. For a few years, VBA programming wasn't available on Office for Macs.

post #58 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post
 

That said, it'll be nice to have Excel for iPad.

Don't expect it to be feature parity with the Windows desktop version.

Of course not.  Microsoft abuses Apple users.  It always has.

post #59 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by d4NjvRzf View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

If true, what does this tell us about the robustness of the Windows Mobile OS and the developer APIs/Tools vis a vis iOS?
Chrome was released for OS X one and a half years after the Windows release. And it sounds like the Windows build involved significantly more work since the developers had to basically build the whole sandboxing system from the ground up (http://arstechnica.com/apple/2009/06/google-sandboxing-for-chrome-on-mac-os-x-a-piece-of-cake/). What does that tell us about the robustness of Windows and Visual Studio compared to OS X and Xcode? 

I'll spell it out for you...

It says that it is harder for Microsoft to upgrade a Microsoft app to run on a Microsoft OS/platform -- than it is for Microsoft to port a Microsoft app to an Apple OS/platform!

It's pretty obvious if you try...

I never used Visual Studio and XCode to a fraction of their potential. Not long ago, I was learning Visual Basic. It's simple and works well.

What I found is that teachers loved Visual Studio because... They knew Visual Studio. Just like people love excel because they only know excel.

Then I was using Matlab. The syntax is very similar to Visual Basic, despite different needs. Matlab runs on Unix, there's no need to bootcamp.

Suites like Eclipse and all have a following, for obvious reasons, but Visual Studio seems just better for everything.

However, I am trying to learn C++ by myself, and I used XCode as IDE, just because I could.

This is just to say the following: once people use XCode, once people follow Apple's guidelines and use their APIs without thinking about "let's make it similar to Android or Windows" they really realize how much of a useless piece of sh+t Microsoft is as a company.

With iOS growing and the Mac better than ever, people are realizing how great the ecosystem is, and Devs are first.

I do not even think that Android has the necessary APIs to make something like Facebook paper, especially graphic wise.

If Kitkat brings it, jelly bean surely doesn't, not to mention gingerbread. And this is where the "bring everything to play services" strategy will get shot in the face.

Google shouldn't be worried about the App Store, just like Microsoft. Both should and are shitting their pants because of XCode.
post #60 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by pedromartins View Post


I never used Visual Studio and XCode to a fraction of their potential. Not long ago, I was learning Visual Basic. It's simple and works well.

What I found is that teachers loved Visual Studio because... They knew Visual Studio. Just like people love excel because they only know excel.
 

Wrong.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by pedromartins View Post

Then I was using Matlab. The syntax is very similar to Visual Basic, despite different needs. Matlab runs on Unix, there's no need to bootcamp.
 
This does not make sense.
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by pedromartins View Post

This is just to say the following: once people use XCode, once people follow Apple's guidelines and use their APIs without thinking about "let's make it similar to Android or Windows" they really realize how much of a useless piece of sh+t Microsoft is as a company.
 
 

Wrong. And barely makes sense.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by pedromartins View Post

I do not even think that Android has the necessary APIs to make something like Facebook paper, especially graphic wise.
 
 

Wrong. And you are clearly not qualified to make such an assessment. You're not a programmer. Don't pretend to be one.

post #61 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by mkral View Post
 

I'll bet that Microsoft had their change of heart right after Apple updated iWork (or whatever the suite is called now) and made it free with all new macs & iOS devices. 

No. This has been in the works since early days of iPad. There have been technical hurdles. And there's the issue of timing. It's complicated when two companies are frenemies.

post #62 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by pedromartins View Post

I never used Visual Studio and XCode to a fraction of their potential. Not long ago, I was learning Visual Basic. It's simple and works well.

What I found is that teachers loved Visual Studio because... They knew Visual Studio. Just like people love excel because they only know excel.

Then I was using Matlab. The syntax is very similar to Visual Basic, despite different needs. Matlab runs on Unix, there's no need to bootcamp.

Suites like Eclipse and all have a following, for obvious reasons, but Visual Studio seems just better for everything.

However, I am trying to learn C++ by myself, and I used XCode as IDE, just because I could.

This is just to say the following: once people use XCode, once people follow Apple's guidelines and use their APIs without thinking about "let's make it similar to Android or Windows" they really realize how much of a useless piece of sh+t Microsoft is as a company.

With iOS growing and the Mac better than ever, people are realizing how great the ecosystem is, and Devs are first.

I do not even think that Android has the necessary APIs to make something like Facebook paper, especially graphic wise.

If Kitkat brings it, jelly bean surely doesn't, not to mention gingerbread. And this is where the "bring everything to play services" strategy will get shot in the face.

Google shouldn't be worried about the App Store, just like Microsoft. Both should and are shitting their pants because of XCode.

Even the most fanatic of iOS devs don't particularly like Xcode.
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post #63 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by StruckPaper View Post
 

No. This has been in the works since early days of iPad. There have been technical hurdles. And there's the issue of timing. It's complicated when two companies are frenemies.

I know about that, but the article (fourth or fifth paragraph, depending on if you count the text above the graphic) indicates that MS was going to wait to release Office for iPad until after the Windows version. It states that the higher-ups had a change of heart late last year. That's what I'm referring to.

post #64 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post


I'll spell it out for you...

It says that it is harder for Microsoft to upgrade a Microsoft app to run on a Microsoft OS/platform -- than it is for Microsoft to port a Microsoft app to an Apple OS/platform!

It's pretty obvious if you try...

 

Okay, let's try your reasoning with my example. Google is primarily a Mac and Linux shop. Yet they managed to get the windows version of Chrome out well before the OS X and Linux ports. Does that mean that Google finds the Win32 API and Visual Studio easier to use compared to the Cocoa APIs and Xcode?

post #65 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by d4NjvRzf View Post

Okay, let's try your reasoning with my example. Google is primarily a Mac and Linux shop. Yet they managed to get the windows version of Chrome out well before the OS X and Linux ports. Does that mean that Google finds the Win32 API and Visual Studio easier to use compared to the Cocoa APIs and Xcode?

Can you actually come out and say what you are trying to say rather than ask convoluted rhetorical questions?.

I think you are saying that back then Google developed for Windows first because it had a larger installed base. That's correct and it would explain why MS are developing for iOS.

But just say your stuff.
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post #66 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by StruckPaper View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by pedromartins View Post

I never used Visual Studio and XCode to a fraction of their potential. Not long ago, I was learning Visual Basic. It's simple and works well.


What I found is that teachers loved Visual Studio because... They knew Visual Studio. Just like people love excel because they only know excel.

 
Wrong.
Quote:
Originally Posted by pedromartins View Post

Then I was using Matlab. The syntax is very similar to Visual Basic, despite different needs. Matlab runs on Unix, there's no need to bootcamp.

 
Wrong. And barely makes sense.
Quote:
Originally Posted by pedromartins View Post

I do not even think that Android has the necessary APIs to make something like Facebook paper, especially graphic wise.

 
Wrong. And you are clearly not qualified to make such an assessment. You're not a programmer. Don't pretend to be one.

What? I'm not a dev. I just said that I used VS (to learn Visual Basic, how to use algorithms, etc.) before using Matlab (mathematics, analysis) and when I had the opportunity I used XCode. And, as I mentioned, despite using those 3 different programs for 3 very different goals XCode just seemed logical, pleasant, better..

Then you have the cases os Mac and iOS apps clearly outclassed similar apps of other ecosystems. Why is that? I know a few people that work on that area and they all say the same thing.

And yes, I doubt Android has the necessary APIs to make something as Facebook paper (did you saw this GUI transitions?) and yes again, a few apps do not take advantage of everything iOS can do so they can be similar on other ecosystems.
post #67 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by d4NjvRzf View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

I'll spell it out for you...


It says that it is harder for Microsoft to upgrade a Microsoft app to run on a Microsoft OS/platform -- than it is for Microsoft to port a Microsoft app to an Apple OS/platform!


It's pretty obvious if you try...

Okay, let's try with my example. Google is primarily a Mac and Linux shop. Yet they managed to get the windows version of Chrome out well before the OS X and Linux ports. Does that mean that Google finds the Win32 API and Visual Studio easier to use compared to the Cocoa APIs and Xcode?

I don't think it means that one way or another... there are political reasons, as well as practical reasons, for a company like Google to port its app to a competitive platform.

I don't know any facts about why Google did what it did...

I suspect that there was a larger and more receptive [to Chrome] market on Windows... and it one-upped Microsoft.

In my example, Microsoft is porting their app to a competitive platform before upgrading it on their own platform... That has got to be embarrassing for Microsoft!

I suspect one reason for this is that the SDK and Developer Tools for iOS are more robust [complete] than those for Windows. I suspect that this is especially true for the Touch UI, Sandboxing and Power Management.

OSX was totally rethought and reimplemented as iOS for Apple iDevices.

I have no idea what Microsoft did with their mobile OSes... but it appears that they just attached a widget UI on top of a ARM or x86 version of Windows. And, the ARM version of Windows is emasculated to support only a few, select, Windows apps.
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post #68 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by StruckPaper View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by mkral View Post

No. This has been in the works since early days of iPad. There have been technical hurdles. And there's the issue of timing. It's complicated when two companies are frenemies.

Respectfully, BS.
post #69 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by asdasd View Post

And hate on MS all you like they do dev tools well.

Great.  the 1% of the world that develops gets great tools to create crappy apps (really, the problem with MS isn't their dev environment, it's that they had no Dev STYLE).   Apple for all it's limitations... drives developers to a really decent first level UI.   Now there are some magicians who make even Apple's UX stodgy, but at least Apple makes them aim high, and THINK about how the user uses the app. 

post #70 of 99

Sorry but I am fine with Pages, iCal, Numbers, & Keynote

post #71 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheOtherGeoff View Post

Great.  the 1% of the world that develops gets great tools to create crappy apps (really, the problem with MS isn't their dev environment, it's that they had no Dev STYLE).   Apple for all it's limitations... drives developers to a really decent first level UI.   Now there are some magicians who make even Apple's UX stodgy, but at least Apple makes them aim high, and THINK about how the user uses the app. 

Visual Studio has nothing to do with design. In fact in large corporations devs have nothing to do with design. That's the product guys, the ux guys and the designers. And Apple gets better, and demands, better quality design although iOS 7 is hardly covered in glory. But nevertheless my point stands. VS>Xcode.
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post #72 of 99
for all of you spinning around on this... let's get back to first principles.
 
1) Microsoft is in the business of making money through writing software
2) To make the most money in the software market it's a simple equation
          $$$ = (number of people wanting your software)*(a $price they think is a value) - ($/hour for developer to write code)*hours*(#ofplatforms to get the max number of people)
 
Microsoft has always written code to this equation.  It just so happened that for 20 years,  the '#of platforms to get the max number of people' was a median value of 1;-).  But to capture markets and steer users... they wrote to other markets if for nothing else, bait to lure people back to the big money software that MS lived on(a taste, and then reduce to  a semi-useful capability to drive the best functional experience to the Win OS version camp... Think Entourage... or IE for Mac... or the old Excel for Mac.
 
in corporate marketplace, where demand for Office compatibility is highest (read: will pay more), with 1 main branch, and  4 sub branches of code, you can write for iOS 7 on  the numbers 1 (iPad Air) and 2 (iPad Mini Retina) currently selling tablets, and the numbers 1(5s) and 3(5c) currently selling mobile phone models, as well as the most popular tablets of all time (iPad 2 and by proxy the iPad Mini), and the most popular form factor iPhone (iPhone 4 /4s) of all time. 
 
Note: the corporate market place... where MS is focused.  They have a better business reason for spending $19.99 for an app on a tablet, and they are an easier sell (sell one exec, and 2000 licenses get bought). They sell to them, they feel the consumer market will surely follow, (minimally to office365.com... which is MS's long term strategy for consumers anyway).  And, iOS consumers have shown they reward good development (or just popular apps).
 
That's why this rumor isn't about Android, or Surface, or Win Phone, or Samsung.   If you're a product manager, you write to where there is money to be made.
 
It's a the same reason why google writes apps for iOS...  Why adobe does, why everyone does.
 
 
To sum up and with apologies to Willie Sutton:
 "Why are you writing software for the iOS system?"
 "because that's where the money is."
post #73 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by paxman View Post
 
And if it does it will be unusable. Excel is like the 'pro' version of Numbers, way too feature heavy to provide a good user experience on an iPad. Numbers is a good iPad spreadsheet but generally speaking, spreadsheets work so much better with a mouse and a larger screen. Excel for iPad will have very limited appeal I reckon, but will probably sell well on name alone.

Missing features on an iOS app could potentially break an Excel document created with the full desktop version. I have that problem with Numbers. Some Excel files fail to work because various formulas or scripts are not supported by Numbers which renders the document useless. 

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post #74 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post


Not for $99 a year it's not.

Exactly.  MS is going to find out that it is really tough to compete with FREE.  Mark my words, 5 years from now everyone is going to say,  "wow, I never thought Pages and Numbers could supplant Word and Excel."

Apple is building the right structure into Pages and Numbers.  Now if they will just add the features business people need.  I mean seriously, how hard is it to add things like line numbers and paragraph numbers.  

post #75 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by vukasika View Post
 

Sorry but I am fine with Pages, iCal, Numbers, & Keynote

Pages isn't suitable for business people.  It can't do paragraph numbers, which in my case are required by law sometimes. I hope one day Apple will pull its head out of its ass and add simple features like paragraph numbering.   


Edited by ash471 - 2/15/14 at 11:39am
post #76 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post
 

Missing features on an iOS app could potentially break an Excel document created with the full desktop version. I have that problem with Numbers. Some Excel files fail to work because various formulas or scripts are not supported by Numbers which renders the document useless. 

Agreed.  That's the problem with Pages and Numbers.  I still think Apple is doing the right thing by starting over with the build and focusing on iOS.  The hope is that one day Apple will add all the desktop features to the iOS version, in which case Apple will be ripe for taking over Microsoft's market.  Mark my words, MS is in BIG trouble for the long term.  The market is going to be split between Android and iOS and iOS is better for enterprise than Android.  MS is going to be irrelevant one day. 

post #77 of 99
Man, they could have made a billion dollars on the App Store by now.
post #78 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by RickFaced View Post
 

I was wondering why they stopped calling it Metro. 


Yup.  A big German retailer (Metro AG) owned it. And if they bargained or fought much, it was never reported:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-19108952

 

And now - after a dispute with BSkyB (Britain based satellite TV provider), they've also given up SkyDrive (now OneDrive).

 

http://www.liveside.net/2013/07/31/microsoft-gives-up-the-skydrive-name-to-bskyb-now-what-2/

 

Just more examples of how in so many ways during the Ballmer years MS went from world-beating behemoth to Wiley Coyote....


Edited by bigpics - 2/15/14 at 3:16pm

An iPhone, a Leatherman and thou...  ...life is complete.

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An iPhone, a Leatherman and thou...  ...life is complete.

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post #79 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by ash471 View Post
 

Exactly.  MS is going to find out that it is really tough to compete with FREE.  Mark my words, 5 years from now everyone is going to say,  "wow, I never thought Pages and Numbers could supplant Word and Excel."

Apple is building the right structure into Pages and Numbers.  Now if they will just add the features business people need.  I mean seriously, how hard is it to add things like line numbers and paragraph numbers.  


Partly correct, e.g., competing with free.  But unless Apple gets back into releasing applications for other platforms (and iTunes for Windows is what got me to buy my first Mac), they can't "supplant" anybody in the general computing world.

Native saves to MS formats, though, could make them a force in all the markets they are in - and iDevices are way ahead of Android in the Enterprise market. 

I know I don't use Pages and Numbers because so many people I exchange files with can't open them, and I won't do the "export to" double file save dance. 

 

Along those lines, I'm currently going through all my files over the last 20+ years and worry about ANYONE being able to read my thousands of WordPerfect files 10 years from now - including lots of family history and genealogy my descendants will find of interest - if they can access the info, that is....

My Keynotes are for my use though, and love the program.


Edited by bigpics - 2/15/14 at 4:40pm

An iPhone, a Leatherman and thou...  ...life is complete.

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An iPhone, a Leatherman and thou...  ...life is complete.

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post #80 of 99

umm.... Office:Mac anyone?

has both Apple and Microsoft forgotten the Mac OS?

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