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Apple's second 'your verse' story focuses on iPad in mountaineering - Page 2

post #41 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post

Right.
Just because you climb a mountain doesn't mean you expose your iPad to sub-zero temperatures for any dangerous period of time, for the same reason you don't climb mountains naked and wait for frostbite and hypothermia to kick in.

I will say my iPad is much more robust than my iPhone. Maybe because of its increased mass. But if I take my phone out of my jacket pocket in below freezing temps for more than a couple of minutes it will shut down. I've simply had to learn I can't rely on my iPhone when it's cold out.
post #42 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluestone View Post
 

Wanted to look at Mt. Everest on Apple Maps, searched for it several different ways, no luck.  One would think they would make it easy given this pitch.

 

Try looking for "Sagarmatha", which is what they actually call it in Nepal.

 

Thompson

post #43 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wiggin View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post

Right.
Just because you climb a mountain doesn't mean you expose your iPad to sub-zero temperatures for any dangerous period of time, for the same reason you don't climb mountains naked and wait for frostbite and hypothermia to kick in.

I will say my iPad is much more robust than my iPhone. Maybe because of its increased mass. But if I take my phone out of my jacket pocket in below freezing temps for more than a couple of minutes it will shut down. I've simply had to learn I can't rely on my iPhone when it's cold out.

Strange - I've exposed my iPhone to much colder conditions and never had that happen.
post #44 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wiggin View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Frac View Post

Dunno, but on a trip to South Georgia Island, the day temp was average -12C. I bought a backpack with a slide-in compartment that hugs the small of the back. I didn't use it with an iPad, but one would have fitted there and kept quite warm. I kept my iPhone under my hat...apparently you lose a lot of heat from there, and it was fine. 1rolleyes.gif

Anyways, those limitations are just to cover Apple's ass come warranty claims and in no way limit it's actual possible use in extreme conditions

But then is it wise to brag about its use for mountain climbing and harse conditions in official company marketing? My iPhone is extremely wimpy in cold weather. I've had it shut down in 40 deg temp with a 50% charge. Anything below freezing and it's pretty much guaranteed to shut down.

Very not normal behaviour. On the trip, among many photographers using iPhones, none complained about such issues. We were using them continuously in sub zero + windchill. Put it this way...gloves were a necessity. I never once ran it flat though to be on the safe side.
You might have to cough up for a new battery 1hmm.gif
post #45 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Really? iPod? Not iTunes, which shouldn’t really be there in the first place? 

I, Rex Velvet, have finally unmasked you, Captain Obvious! I have already defeated my arch nemesis Phoenix Jones; you, Captain Obvious shall be the next to feel the wrath of the people's villain.
post #46 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post

I though that perhaps you were thinking of some iPad case that can stand the conditions, perhaps even warming up with 2 penlite Duracels.

Nothing fancy. If the climbers aren't carrying any external heat sources (chemical warmer packs, for example), then their bodies would be the primary heat source while climbing. The most economical solution is then to keep your iPad close you body (say, in an insulated pocket).
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post

Good point, but I must also point out that the climber said he he also takes the iPad out and keeps it in his hands. That would expose it to the cold directly.

Sure, but that doesn't mean the iPad would lose heat so fast that it would necessarily stop functioning. Eventually it would freeze, but that's not how the mountain climbers are using it. In dry, cold, windless conditions, it might retain enough heat to operate just fine for extended periods.

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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post #47 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by muppetry View Post


Strange - I've exposed my iPhone to much colder conditions and never had that happen.

 

It is strange, but there are a few threads on Apple's discussion board of others having similar problems, and I have a couple of friends who also have the issue. I now have a "rule of 75". If the % battery charge + temp in F is under 75 there's a good chance my phone will shut down...and that's with it in my jacket pocket where is should be a few degrees warmer. Once it warms back up the battery charge is right where it was before I went outside. The battery has expected performance in non-cold weather (18-month old phone, charge will last two days just can't go outside on the 2nd day! LOL).

 

It just seems the OS is a bit too picky about slight drops in voltage (expected with batteries in cold weather) and shuts down prematurely. Or some random battery defect leads to poor battery performance in cold weather. I'd replace the battery, but not sure how effective that would be. Just need to get through the winter so I can upgrade this summer and hope the new phone works better. It doesn't seem a wide spread problem, but definitely an issue for those of us it affects when you can't rely on your phone to work when it should.

post #48 of 56

I had that issue with my 5.  If I rubbed the back plate for a few seconds I could often create enough heat that it'd turn on again.  Weird and annoying problem.

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post #49 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wiggin View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by muppetry View Post


Strange - I've exposed my iPhone to much colder conditions and never had that happen.

 

It is strange, but there are a few threads on Apple's discussion board of others having similar problems, and I have a couple of friends who also have the issue. I now have a "rule of 75". If the % battery charge + temp in F is under 75 there's a good chance my phone will shut down...and that's with it in my jacket pocket where is should be a few degrees warmer. Once it warms back up the battery charge is right where it was before I went outside. The battery has expected performance in non-cold weather (18-month old phone, charge will last two days just can't go outside on the 2nd day! LOL).

 

It just seems the OS is a bit too picky about slight drops in voltage (expected with batteries in cold weather) and shuts down prematurely. Or some random battery defect leads to poor battery performance in cold weather. I'd replace the battery, but not sure how effective that would be. Just need to get through the winter so I can upgrade this summer and hope the new phone works better. It doesn't seem a wide spread problem, but definitely an issue for those of us it affects when you can't rely on your phone to work when it should.

 

That does sound like a hardware fault of some kind, but certainly no guarantee that it is the battery. Have you talked to Apple about it? They might be willing to exchange the phone.

post #50 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluestone View Post

Wanted to look at Mt. Everest on Apple Maps, searched for it several different ways, no luck.  One would think they would make it easy given this pitch.

Huh? It was the first hit on my query: "mt everest"
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post

Sure, but that doesn't mean the iPad would lose heat so fast that it would necessarily stop functioning. Eventually it would freeze, but that's not how the mountain climbers are using it. In dry, cold, windless conditions, it might retain enough heat to operate just fine for extended periods.

And apparently it does, since the took it with them and have these stories to tell. Quite amazing. If I were to limb that mountain, or any mountain for that matter, I wouldn't be holding an iPad; I'd be holding on to my life.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crowley View Post

I had that issue with my 5.  If I rubbed the back plate for a few seconds I could often create enough heat that it'd turn on again.  Weird and annoying problem.

Oh, 5. I read it as wife
Send from my iPhone. Excuse brevity and auto-corrupt.
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Send from my iPhone. Excuse brevity and auto-corrupt.
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post #51 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by muppetry View Post

Hard to spend much time above 10,000 ft in the Netherlands, I would guess.

Heh, yes; more like 10,000 leagues under the sea.
"If the young are not initiated into the village, they will burn it down just to feel its warmth."
- African proverb
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"If the young are not initiated into the village, they will burn it down just to feel its warmth."
- African proverb
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post #52 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crowley View Post

If I rubbed the back plate for a few seconds I could often create enough heat that it'd turn on again.  Weird and annoying problem.

If taken out of context...
post #53 of 56

Doctor's appointment booked.

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post #54 of 56
I thought that iOS devices didn't have real GPS units. Don't they have cell phone assisted GPS, which requires connection to the cell phone network?
post #55 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by theDuderino View Post

I thought that iOS devices didn't have real GPS units. Don't they have cell phone assisted GPS, which requires connection to the cell phone network?

All cellular-capable iOS devices (since the 3G) have regular GPS receivers that work with or without a cellular connection. Assisted GPS simply refers to making use of cellular or wifi location data, when available, to improve satellite lock times. Once the GPS signal is locked the cellular/wifi data are ignored.
post #56 of 56
OT, but it's a touch annoying that there's no easy way to turn cell signal off while leaving GPS on. Airplane mode turns GPS off and there's no independent way of turning all cell signal off (just data). I suspect taking the SIM out might work, but a control would be nicer.

Would be useful when navigating and running low on battery.

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