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Intel CEO says relationship with Apple remains positive, companies are growing 'closer' - Page 2

post #41 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by SockRolid View Post

Interesting.  
Even more interesting: change the years and (roughly) substitute "ARM" for "Intel."
You get this (which for various reasons is likely impossible, but whatever):

2015: Apple buys ARM; all chips designed and manufactured in-house.  All deals with other companies terminated.

2017: Custom ARM chips put Macs on the forefront of integrated computing.

Or how about: Apple buys Intel and ARM. All other deals terminated.
iPad a Dream.
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iPad a Dream.
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post #42 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eriamjh View Post

I wouldn't be surprised if Tim Cook talks to Intel frequently telling them that he'd love to use Intel chips in the iPads and iPhones if they were as good as ARM.  Intel is certainly kicking itself for missing this boat.  Apple probably sends them specs and says "match this power level, performance, price", etc. and Intel fails to do so year after year.  

Apple doesn't buy big companies like Intel or ARM.  They buy little companies and roll out their tech years later after maturing it in house.  Apple doesn't pay billions, they pay millions for other companies and their IP.  

Not quite—Tim Cook recently stated that Apple were open to acquisition of large companies if the right opportunity presented itself.
iPad a Dream.
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iPad a Dream.
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post #43 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by schlack View Post

want to see Intel succeed, but they've missed the mobile boat.
they should buy ARM; license their IP and handle manufacturing for customers, a one stop shop for reference and custom ARM processors.

Intel already has an ARM license which they acquired when they bought the cast-off remains of Compaq's purchase of Digital Equipment Corporation - I guess people don't remember StrongARM or XScale, which isn't much of a surprise because they were very unremarkable processors, and the only real OS you could run on them at the time was Windows Embedded / PocketPC.

 

By the way, the "Bay Trail" Atom is not the sluggish piece of crap Clovertown core that Intel was selling before, and there will be a 64-bit multi-core version Real Soon Now™.

post #44 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post
 

 

I said they do X. You said they don’t do Y because Z.

 

Just shut up. Anyone stupid enough to pretend they’re illiterate doesn’t deserve the time of day. Had you read the post, you wouldn’t be posting this nonsense

 

You are delusional. I'm done with you because you obviously have your head stuck in the sand.

 

X = Buy component company and  cease production for all other companies

 

Quote:
 When did Apple buy Qualcomm and cease production for all other companies? Did Apple also buy Sharp and stop producing LCD's for all other companies? Did they also buy Hynix, Toshiba, and Sandisk and cease production of nand for all other companies? Did they buy Broadcom and Texas Instruments and cease production of touch controllers for all other companies? Did they buy Sony and stop producing camera modules for all other companies? I don't think they have actually "done it for all their other component companies."

or

Quote:
 When did Apple X? Did Apple also X? Did they also X? Did they X? Did they X? I don't think they have actually "X"

No where did I mention causality, and you can directly replace X with what you have said Apple has done for "all their other component companies".

 

Good luck Sevenfeet.

 

-PopinFRESH

post #45 of 52
Originally Posted by PopinFRESH View Post

You are delusional.

 

Except I made a statement based on things that have already happened.

 

You made a statement based on things that have not happened. You’re not even talking about the same concept.

 

Talk about delusional.

 

READ. THE. POST.

Originally posted by Relic

...those little naked weirdos are going to get me investigated.
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Originally posted by Relic

...those little naked weirdos are going to get me investigated.
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post #46 of 52
The post was unclear and now you've clarified what you meant. Calm down, both of you.

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post #47 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sevenfeet View Post

Apple buying Intel won't happen.  Apple has no desire to make money on everyone else's mainline chips (and ceasing production is stupid for a zillion reasons).  What Apple can do is have Intel build it's A-class ARM chips instead of Samsung.  I'm sure Apple would love that but Intel still would have to get over being just a chip-fab for a competitor's technology.

Intel has produced ARM chips before. So I wouldn't go that far.

I know this all sounds kinda gloomy, but the entire reason we still use the 80x86 design today is because Intel has failed every time they tried to introduce something better. Right idea, wrong time. The 80386 was introduced almost 10 years too early for software to use it. They produced their own RISC design later replacing it with ARM on XScale before selling it to Marvell. Intel still holds an ARM license.

So Intel producing ARM parts again, strong possibility. It doesn't necessarily mean they will get into designing ARM parts again. ARM parts belong in Mobile devices not servers. x86 parts may eventually be thrown aside for ARM or some successor to it when there's no more room for improvement, but there's still at least one more die shrink left before it's entirely uneconomical, and even then without redesigning software to take advantage of additional cores, most desktops and servers will be stuck at quadcore levels. At any rate, Intel is dreaming if they think their ATOM parts have any value beyond being used in cheap linux routers/micro-servers.
post #48 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by Misa View Post

At any rate, Intel is dreaming if they think their ATOM parts have any value beyond being used in cheap linux routers/micro-servers.

 

As someone who has actually used an Atom device based on the new Bay Trail core launched in Q4, you are completely wrong.

 

Bay Trail Atom has earned design wins for several portable devices that actually work (unlike previous Atom-powered versions), and it would be right at home in a Thin Client, just like the previous Atom parts.  Or point-of-sale devices.  Or customer service kiosks.  Or anywhere else where there is an advantage to a low cost chip running X86, that consumes less than 6 watts of power.

 

The company I work for has about 60,000 thin clients alone, and we're only one of HP's customers.  It says nothing of what Dell / Wyse sells, or Lenovo trying to enter the market...

post #49 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by MachineShedFred View Post
 

 

As someone who has actually used an Atom device based on the new Bay Trail core launched in Q4, you are completely wrong.

 

We're considering putting together touch based call-handling terminals using Android on Intel. 17" touch displays are still a pain but there are companies with touch sensitive films to be placed over. Once this matures a little more there's a serious potential to put these together for under $250/seat and dropping.

 

The reduction in training time and ability to simply tap to activate something would probably be worth the initial switching cost too. There's a really interesting future for this stuff.

post #50 of 52

You don't grow closer by undermining your business partner.

We all remember Intel CEO Paul Otellini going on stage to shake hands with Steve Jobs. He later had his company undertake a campaign called Ultrabook, to undermine Apple by having competitors make Windows-based clones of the MacBook Air.

Apple doesn't forget crap like this.

post #51 of 52
I'm pretty sure Apple would have been aware and comfortable with Intel pushing that angle. It (exclusivity and a lag before a marketing push) was possibly part of the deal they made to make the custom boards for the MacBook Air in the first place, or soon after.

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post #52 of 52
Originally Posted by Crowley View Post
It was possibly part of the deal they made to make the custom boards for the MacBook Air in the first place, or soon after.

 

I buy that. What I don’t buy is Apple approving of the “Inspired by Intel” tag.

Originally posted by Relic

...those little naked weirdos are going to get me investigated.
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Originally posted by Relic

...those little naked weirdos are going to get me investigated.
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