or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPhone › Apple releases iOS 7.0.6 with fix for SSL connection verification, rolls out Apple TV Software Update [u]
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Apple releases iOS 7.0.6 with fix for SSL connection verification, rolls out Apple TV Software... - Page 2

post #41 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by ItsTheInternet View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post

As far as I understand it, every time you install iOS on a device it phones back to Apple to check that it is authorised to be installed. In order for Apple to distribute an iOS6 update (I believe) they would have to re-permit people to downgrade to 6 too. I very much doubt they'd be happy doing that. What's a few insecure customers who will buy new phones vs not having everyone on the same version of the OS.

Plus I can be really pithy here and just say "If you want control over your phone, buy an Android" but I think people might take that the wrong way. Still that is the real key difference between the two platforms. On iOS you must assume Apple knows best and defer to them. On a plain Android then it's up to you what you do, but you can't trust things as much as with Apple.

1) that's a VERY good point you're making

2) LOL @ 'buy Android for control' . I certainly laughed, and don't 'take it the wrong way'. In fact, it's also true as far as I know.

3) one thing though, after the release of iOS7 (Wednesday I believe) one was able to downgrade again to iOS6 until the following Saturday. So for a few days they allowed it, and is therefore 'technically possible and 'in place'. They simply removed the signing of iOS6 for all devices that are able to run iOS7. That part, being able to do but disabled after a few days is actually my gripe. But you make a very good counter point which I will happily forward to my friend. (he'll probably tell me it's strange that he can restore an iPhone backup but that it won't downgrade it back to iOS6)
Send from my iPhone. Excuse brevity and auto-corrupt.
Reply
Send from my iPhone. Excuse brevity and auto-corrupt.
Reply
post #42 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Benjamin Frost View Post


You're writing a positive comment about Apple. Are you sick?

 

Actually yes I have bloody flu and it's still freezing up north.

 

Seriously though, the only negative things I've written about Apple is to do with their behaviour in a couple of court cases. Otherwise I don't think I've criticised them at all.

post #43 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post


1) that's a VERY good point you're making

3) one thing though, after the release of iOS7 (Wednesday I believe) one was able to downgrade again to iOS6 until the following Saturday. So for a few days they allowed it, and is therefore 'technically possible and 'in place'. They simply removed the signing of iOS6 for all devices that are able to run iOS7. That part, being able to do but disabled after a few days is actually my gripe. But you make a very good counter point which I will happily forward to my friend. (he'll probably tell me it's strange that he can restore an iPhone backup but that it won't downgrade it back to iOS6)

I could probably badger someone at Apple to find out for sure, but they'd probably be risking their job and probably wouldn't be allowed to tell me anyway, so I won't bother.

 

 

Quote:
2) LOL @ 'buy Android for control' . I certainly laughed, and don't 'take it the wrong way'. In fact, it's also true as far as I know.

Nah, for the most part you'll either lose your warranty or lose any support at all. Having a standardised manufacturer-enforced firmware has become the modern standard. I'm not really that opposed to it too, I can unlock my Nexus with a single command but at least for now I'm happy with the OS on it and having it locked and signed increases the security for me.

post #44 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by ItsTheInternet View Post

I could probably badger someone at Apple to find out for sure, but they'd probably be risking their job and probably wouldn't be allowed to tell me anyway, so I won't bother.

Indeed, don't bother.
Quote:
Nah, for the most part you'll either lose your warranty or lose any support at all. Having a standardised manufacturer-enforced firmware has become the modern standard. I'm not really that opposed to it too, I can unlock my Nexus with a single command but at least for now I'm happy with the OS on it and having it locked and signed increases the security for me.

That's good to know, and the Android user is probably better off for it. Those that wish to install older software can still do it by rooting as I understand it.
Send from my iPhone. Excuse brevity and auto-corrupt.
Reply
Send from my iPhone. Excuse brevity and auto-corrupt.
Reply
post #45 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by ItsTheInternet View Post

Actually yes I have bloody flu and it's still freezing up north.

Seriously though, the only negative things I've written about Apple is to do with their behaviour in a couple of court cases. Otherwise I don't think I've criticised them at all.

Get well soon.
"If the young are not initiated into the village, they will burn it down just to feel its warmth."
- African proverb
Reply
"If the young are not initiated into the village, they will burn it down just to feel its warmth."
- African proverb
Reply
post #46 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post


That's good to know, and the Android user is probably better off for it. Those that wish to install older software can still do it by rooting as I understand it.

I think there's two stages to 'unsecuring' these devices. The first is 'rooting' which is to get access to the root user on the device. This lets you modify the existing software, but won't let you replace the kernel. Then you can 'unlock the bootloader' on some devices. This is what you can do on a Nexus, and that lets you install anything you like assuming it has driver support.

 

It's a nice system if there are drivers available, but manufacturer support is really the big sticking point on upgrades and so it's the big sticking point on hacking at your devices too.

post #47 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by ItsTheInternet View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post

That's good to know, and the Android user is probably better off for it. Those that wish to install older software can still do it by rooting as I understand it.
I think there's two stages to 'unsecuring' these devices. The first is 'rooting' which is to get access to the root user on the device. This lets you modify the existing software, but won't let you replace the kernel. Then you can 'unlock the bootloader' on some devices. This is what you can do on a Nexus, and that lets you install anything you like assuming it has driver support.

It's a nice system if there are drivers available, but manufacturer support is really the big sticking point on upgrades and so it's the big sticking point on hacking at your devices too.

What exactly is the incentive to root it and install software that isn't available in the App Store? Isn't the store chockfull of utilities? Can you give an example?
Send from my iPhone. Excuse brevity and auto-corrupt.
Reply
Send from my iPhone. Excuse brevity and auto-corrupt.
Reply
post #48 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post


What exactly is the incentive to root it and install software that isn't available in the App Store? Isn't the store chockfull of utilities? Can you give an example?

 

It all depends on what you want to do with it really. Most Android stuff is supported without rooting, a bit more so than jailbreaking. For example I use 'Light Flow' to set custom notification patterns (Hangouts is flashing blue, charged is rapid flashing green, annoying work related alerts are a slow flashing pink etc). I have NFC stickers that change the phone's profile.

 

Rooting lets you install things like Xposed which comes with a whole bunch of plugins that I know very little about that lets you customise features a lot more without having to modify the applications directly. Here's an example of one plugin I know of: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=62Q3-BnEFX0

 

As I said though, I'm not rooted nor unlocked, so I just use the basic OS.

post #49 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by ItsTheInternet View Post

^ post

Ah, good to know; thanks. I'll try that video tomorrow, right now it doesn't load. I don't have Flash installed but it also doesn't work on my iPad. That might come across an oxymoron but every time I need to watch something in Flash I always grab my iPad, which works.
Send from my iPhone. Excuse brevity and auto-corrupt.
Reply
Send from my iPhone. Excuse brevity and auto-corrupt.
Reply
post #50 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by ItsTheInternet View Post
 
On iOS you must assume Apple knows best and defer to them.

 

Until recently that has been a fairly safe bet. THIS time the inclusion of the iPhone 4 on the "Approved for iOS7" list is a mixed bag -- added features but performance does suffer. I updated mine a few months ago, and based on my experience my wife decided she preferred to stay with iOS6. Now if she wants to plug the SSL hole she has no choice but to update.

 

And again, as I mention every time this comes up, I actually prefer Apple letting those of us on borderline equipment try the new OS and decide for ourselves whether or we want to trade some performance in exchange for new features. Unfortunately there's just no way to go back if you decide the new version isn't for you.


Edited by Lorin Schultz - 2/25/14 at 12:15pm

Lorin Schultz (formerly V5V)

Audio Engineer

V5V Digital Media, Vancouver, BC Canada

Reply

Lorin Schultz (formerly V5V)

Audio Engineer

V5V Digital Media, Vancouver, BC Canada

Reply
post #51 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lorin Schultz View Post

^ post

I agree, we should have that ability. According to Apple there was nothing wrong with the older iOS version when it was released so they shouldn't force people to upgrade and make it look like it's outdated or something.

There's really nothing wrong with ios6, or 7 for that matter, why not let people patch their version of choice for things like this SSL/TLS issue? Especially when they did create a fix for 6.1.6
Send from my iPhone. Excuse brevity and auto-corrupt.
Reply
Send from my iPhone. Excuse brevity and auto-corrupt.
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: iPhone
  • Apple releases iOS 7.0.6 with fix for SSL connection verification, rolls out Apple TV Software Update [u]
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPhone › Apple releases iOS 7.0.6 with fix for SSL connection verification, rolls out Apple TV Software Update [u]