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Apple details Touch ID and Secure Enclave tech in new security white paper - Page 2

post #41 of 48
Remember when Google brought out face recognition to unlock their devices? I watched the demo on a Google keynote - guess what it failed to unlock the device. Since then I have never seen anyone unlock their device using this method. I don't think many will be using Samsungs fingerprint scanner either.
post #42 of 48
Samsung has been using swipe fingerprint sensors for years for doors for example. I wonder if they took that much care to be certain that the fingerprint doesn't leave their device though.
I hope hackers will analyze the iPhone as much as possible to see if the print can't indeed be sent back to Apple. Haven't heard from them yet, so that's a good sign.
post #43 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

And even if one doesn't want to go that route but would instead just use the dial pad with a longer (or shorter) PIN they can do that too by enabling the complex passcode option. Previously, when you enabled that option and only used numbers you would still get the QWERTY keyboard on screen.

The usual nice attention to detail.
post #44 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cpsro View Post
 

Just slightly off-topic...

Originally I experienced significant difficulty with Touch ID. It would work okay for a few hours up to a day or so, after which I'd need to retrain the system completely--and even train on the same digit multiple times (up to the limit of 5) in order to get a decent rate of recognition. Overall the Touch ID experience was unreliable enough that I abandoned its use.

Recently I revisited Touch ID in iOS 7.1 beta, and I am elated to report Touch ID has worked flawlessly. Through a solid week of usage, I have not had to retrain nor did I need to train on the same digit more than once. I have not once had to enter my passcode. The few times Touch ID didn't work the very first time (in a fraction of a second) was when my digit was obviously moist. Quickly drying off the offending digit or switching to a dry one provided near-instant access. Great job, Apple!

 

Thanks for the information, good to know!

 

It's interesting that it 'continuously "learns" a user's fingerprint over time'.

Maybe thats the reason performance degrades over time.

It could be that it isn't a hardware problem and a software tweak can fix this (maybe iOS 7.1).

It would also be nice if continuous learning can be switched off via settings.

post #45 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Slurpy View Post

Obviously, Apple put a shitload of thought and care into the security and privacy of Touch ID, from all angles, and all aspects. And that came out 5 months ago.  Let's contrast that with the (apparently barely functional and poorly thought out) solution by Samsung- which apparently is integrated with Paypal (a horrendous company from my experience) on day one. Oh, and that can't even authenticate purchases from the official Google store. Did Samsung even mention privacy or security in its briefings? How much access will the OS and 3rd party apps have to the sensor? How is it encrypted? Does anyone even care? Apparently not. Just like everything Samsung does, this was thrown is as a shitty "me too!" after-thought. Apparently, it's nearly impossible to "swipe" the sensor while holding the phone in one hand. How the **** did they think that was ok? Most of the time I can unlock touch ID while pulling it out of my pocket. If I had to use 2 hand, it would defeat the entire purpose. 

If Apple came out with such a solution 5 months ago they would have been absolutely torched in the media. But with Samsung, it's always a free pass. 

So well said, Slurpy! I've really missed your contributions. You say it like it is, a bit like DED, but with more slang and a few fewer words.
Edited by Benjamin Frost - 2/27/14 at 6:19am
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post #46 of 48
Thanks, I appreciate that. Yes, I say it like it is. Its gotten me banned a few times, but so be it. I also have no problem bashing apple when its warranted (which I've done on many occasions) as long as its based on verifiable facts, correct context, and objectivity. The problem with most people is that this is almost never the case.
post #47 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

I've even enabled the complex passcode option so I get the full keyboard when I restart my iPhone 5S. And even if one doesn't want to go that route but would instead just use the dial pad with a longer (or shorter) PIN they can do that too by enabling the complex passcode option. Previously, when you enabled that option and only used numbers you would still get the QWERTY keyboard on screen.

 

I've thought about it again and... it's not good that they changed that. This way, if someone wants to guess the password they know that it's only made of numbers.
post #48 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by ClemyNX View Post


I see your point but it's still a huge number of options that are too excessive to even consider and it does come with the added bonus of the their assuming it must be a 4-digit PIIN so I think the overall benefit is positive.

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