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Context-aware AI seen as key component behind Apple's new CarPlay - Page 2

post #41 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

Google certainly places ads on behalf of companies like Sears or Walmart or BMW. They didn't sell your file to Sears or Walmart or BMW. You're welcome. Hope you're no longer confused.

In any event I was registering my surprise that Apple would say they'll be mining emails and texts. I'm not particularly surprised they do so, nor do I care if they do. I can't think of another way they could deliver on the feature, and it will definitely be both helpful and safer for the driver.

I would say that the main difference between the two companies is that Google will take your information and use it to make money for their benefit. Apple, in this situation, is using your own information for your benefit only. I wouldn't expect that Siri wouldn't be burning up data minutes just to be able to speak. That would make her mute in downtown traffic, or anywhere cell communication may be difficult.

The Apple CarPlay may have included intelligence that doesn't exist in the iPhone that makes the car a stand-alone device that uses the data and media stored in the iPhone for it's navigation data and media replay. THAT makes the most sense.


One thing not mentioned in the article is the statement that Ford is one of the future users of CarPlay. That would seem to say that Microsoft is sucking air moving forward.
"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
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"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
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post #42 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ration Al View Post

The description in the article seems to suggest that CarPlay will display destinations options relevant to what you are doing on your phone right now, likely your most recently read email or message. That doesn't sound like it needs to do any heavy duty data mining to accomplish its job.

I'd like to know how effective Siri will be in a noisy car cabin (A/C blowing, kids in back seat, windows down, et al) to minimize looking down to use a touch screen. Will it use mics built into the car and activated by a steering wheel mounted button like in my Honda?

Siri will speak out through the car's radio amplifier and use noise-cancellation microphones for better clarity. This is also done to optimize the use of the hands-free iPhone's communications. As for the kids in the back seat; some of the lower-end cars will offer a driver-initiated back-seat water spritzer to keep the internal noise level under control. 1wink.gif
"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
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"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
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post #43 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andysol View Post


Regardless- what is this- the official gator guy thread? Must you rebut to every comment?

No. He only feels compelled to respond to (what he perceives as) anti-Google comments. It somehow seems to wound him deeply.
post #44 of 54

For me, it's either a Wankel, a gas turbine, a cogenerating gas/steam turbine, or an electric. Outside of those, nothing is as smooth (a V12 starts to come close, although at a horrific weight penalty). Additionally, I am terrible snob about weight balance, and I am unaware of any sub-$35K automobile with a perfect 50/50 front/rear weight distribution, so yes, it really is more important than all the other features that go into a modern automobile because it enables those other features that are pertinent to me. Additionally, why would I want to take on debt to upgrade the infotainment system? Isn't that putting the cart well in front of the horse?

post #45 of 54
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post
Not sure what you mean by "nothing like this feature". If it's a Siri request it all goes to Apple servers. Not sure why you're convinced servers won't be involved.

 

THEORY.

 

No one can prove it either way until we get our hands on the thing and capture some data as it goes to and from the Internet, but…

 

I imagine Apple’s implementation checks your data locally for relevant information and then uses just that information–wholly removed from its context–for calls out to its servers to perform actions.

 

I still don’t like the idea, myself. Locations in Calendar and Contacts? Absolutely. Locations in e-mails and messages? I don’t think so.

Originally posted by Relic

...those little naked weirdos are going to get me investigated.
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Originally posted by Relic

...those little naked weirdos are going to get me investigated.
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post #46 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by longpath View Post

I'm interested to see who will offer this in the aftermarket. Say what you will; but I am a die hard Wankel rotary fan and there are no cars on the market with a Wankel rotary, so I am hanging onto my Mazda for as long as possible. Nonetheless, I am very much aware that the satnav and stereo are a decade old. An iOS based integrated offering would be much simpler to keep current (Mazda's OEM for the satnav used in 2004 RX-8s has released one map update in the entire time the car has existed).

As a Mazda3 owner, I also noticed Mazda conspicuously absent from Apple's OEM list. I could understand this exclusion back when Ford held a controlling interest in the company, and Ford had that development partnership with Microsoft (which provided the OS platform for Ford's disastrous MyFordTouch touch control interface and helped drop Ford's quality ranking from the top 10 to now near the bottom). But, now that Ford has divested nearly all of its holdings in Mazda, they no longer have any backroom deals or alliances that would prevent them from expanding their iOS offerings.

 

For all of its wonderful driveability and chassis balance attributes, the unfortunate weakness of the rotary engine in this day and age is its fuel economy with city driving.  Rumor is that Mazda is looking into using rotary engines for a hybrid, since their compact size and smooth operation in steady state would be ideal to pair with a hybrid drive for stop-and-go driving. 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by SolopsismX
 
It's a brilliant design, especially for being before we had computer models, but is the type of ICE really more important than all the other features that go into a modern automobile?

Depends on how much the driver values the actual driving experience, rather than all of the peripheral activities that coincide with the drive.  For the U.S. market, I think that reliability, size for the price, and fuel economy seem to rank highly to varying degrees (plus the intangibles like the driving experience, design, image, etc.).  The features are somewhat important, and the technology features can wow a buyer.  But, most consumers don't go for the higher trim levels or option packages that feature much of the technology. (Check a car dealer's inventory and you typically find the midlevel or base models in much greater abundance than the optioned out versions)

 

Trying to bring technology features to the masses by making them more widely available in the lower trim levels can also backfire in a big way.  For example, Ford and Hyundai have probably been the two non-luxury brands that most aggressively pushed technology features throughout their product line.  Problem is that their systems had usability and reliability problems.  Where Hyundai ranked #1 in quality among non-luxury brands just four years ago and Ford ranked in the top 10 just three years ago, both brands have had a rapid drop in their quality rankings and now rank well below the industry average, largely due to issues and/or backlash from their technology features. 

 

If anything, the technological revolution occurring under the hood is actually a lot more compelling than the stuff going on the dashboards. Once exotic refinements to the ICE powertrain such as distributorless ignition, direct injection, dual clutch transmissions, electronic throttle, have become the norm.  And that's before you add hybrid, electric, clean diesel, and more exotic niche powertrains like CNG and fuel cell engines to the mix. When an electric car like the Tesla Model S also produces class-leading performance, I think we're at the tip of the iceberg in seeing what alternative propulsion systems are capable of.  As mentioned above, Mazda is supposedly experimenting with the Wankel rotary as a hybrid plant, which better optimizes the design's strengths (compact size, smooth operation, and low center of gravity) and negates its weaknesses (stop-and-go efficiency).

post #47 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleSauce007 View Post

Google does to mine gmail to target users with advertising.
Just keep your iPhone free of Google applications and everything will be fine.

Boy, you don't know how true your statement is!! I sent an email to a business friend's gmail account and he opened it with his Windows 7 Chrome browser. When he did, several of the words in my text had been converted to hot links to Google advertisers. There was NO WAY he could have not assumed that I made those links, and it confused the hell out of him because he clicked on the linked words.

When I explained what was going on, he threw out the Chrome browser for Internet Explorer. This would normally be a good move, but Microsoft has integrated Bing into their new browser so whatever web address you type in the URL field is treated as a Bing search request... so instead of going straight to the site, you get a page full of Bing search results... WTF!!! He then tried to install the Firefox browser but IE blocked him from doing this. He even took his laptop to an expert that couldn't get past the IE block.

I can understand that Microsoft would do such things, they love to degrade any experience their user has, but the Google manipulation of his received email was totally unexpected!
"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
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"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
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post #48 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

THEORY.

No one can prove it either way until we get our hands on the thing and capture some data as it goes to and from the Internet, but…

I imagine Apple’s implementation checks your data locally for relevant information and then uses just that information–wholly removed from its context–for calls out to its servers to perform actions.

I still don’t like the idea, myself. Locations in Calendar and Contacts? Absolutely. Locations in e-mails and messages? I don’t think so.

Both are possible theories, but I have to say that yours is by far the least likely. If it does include contextual e-mail scanning it in all likelihood will be done server side. It would need to scan every email completely and match it to existing streets for address recognition. How else could it know what is an address. If it was done locally it would be a serious strain on the SoC and drastically impact battery life. There is a reason why Siri's contextual analysis happens server side and this is just small sentences at a time.

But like I stated in a previous comment I don't see why this should be a problem. Just like data collected by Siri this will fall under the collection of 'non-personal information' under Apple's privacy policy which means it's linked to a Unique Device Identifier. The information does include IP address and such, so it's not completely anonymous but it is not directly linked to your AppleID. This means it's not linked to a name, although Apple can if it wants combine it to your AppleID but then it would fall under 'personal information' in the privacy policy. 'Non-personal information' can be used for targeted advertising, personal data (AppleID) not.
Edited by Chipsy - 3/4/14 at 4:24am
post #49 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chipsy View Post

Both are possible theories, but I have to say that yours is by far the least likely. If it does include contextual e-mail scanning it in all likelihood will be done server side. It would need to scan every email completely and match it to existing streets for address recognition. How else could it know what is an address. If it was done locally it would be a serious strain on the SoC and drastically impact battery life. There is a reason why Siri's contextual analysis happens server side and this is just small sentences at a time.

But like I stated in a previous comment I don't see why this should be a problem. Just like data collected by Siri this will fall under the collection of 'non-personal information' under Apple's privacy policy which means it's linked to a Unique Device Identifier. The information does include IP address and such, so it's not completely anonymous but it is not directly linked to your AppleID. This means it's not linked to a name, although Apple can if it wants combine it to your AppleID but then it would fall under 'personal information' in the privacy policy. 'Non-personal information' can be used for targeted advertising, personal data (AppleID) not.


Maybe you missed my earlier post. Tallest is wrong in thinking its a theory- they are already doing it today on my iPhone. You are wrong in thinking its in the servers. Tallest is exactly right, except his theory is reality.

Again- in my earlier post (you can do this too)- you can turn data off and it still works on addresses you have never used but are stored locally in your emails or messages. So while I appreciate your Multi-paragraph responses, you could have saved some time simply reading the previous posts. 1wink.gif

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2012 27" iMac i7, 2010 27" iMac i7, 2011 Mac Mini i5
iPad Air, iPad Mini Retina, (2) iPhone 5S, iPod Touch 5
Time Capsule 5, (3) AirPort Express 2, (2) Apple TV 3

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post #50 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andysol View Post

Maybe you missed my earlier post. Tallest is wrong in thinking its a theory- they are already doing it today on my iPhone. You are wrong in thinking its in the servers. Tallest is exactly right, except his theory is reality.

Again- in my earlier post (you can do this too)- you can turn data off and it still works on addresses you have never used but are stored locally in your emails or messages. So while I appreciate your Multi-paragraph responses, you could have saved some time simply reading the previous posts. 1wink.gif

From the moment they have been scanned it's logic you can use it locally, but that doesn't mean that the original scan of the e-mail wasn't done server side and then establishing local connections. Let me ask you this, does it also recognize addresses that are not in your contact list? If so it definitely is being analyzed server side first to determine which are addresses in the e-mail and then locally based on contact list a connection is made where possible (which by the way still can also happen server side and then made available locally). It's not because you didn't use it yourself before and only used it offline that it wasn't first scanned server side at the moment of arrival, the determination of what are addresses can still have happened/and probably did happen server side. The fact that you can use already established connections locally proves absolutely nothing about the scanning happening locally.

Btw I'm not talking about addresses of calendar events, those can be completely local, but emails very unlikely.
Edited by Chipsy - 3/4/14 at 6:29am
post #51 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chipsy View Post

From the moment they have been scanned it's logic you can use it locally, but that doesn't mean that the original scan of the e-mail wasn't done server side and then establishing local connections. Let me ask you this, does it also recognize addresses that are not in your contact list? If so it definitely is being analyzed server side first to determine which are addresses in the e-mail and then locally based on contact list a connection is made where possible (which by the way still can also happen server side and then made available locally). It's not because you didn't use it yourself before and only used it offline that it wasn't first scanned server side at the moment of arrival, the determination of what are addresses can still have happened/and probably did happen server side. The fact that you can use already established connections locally proves absolutely nothing about the scanning happening locally.

Btw I'm not talking about addresses of calendar events, those can be completely local, but emails very unlikely.

You're having trouble comprehending.

Read my previous post on the other page and it will answer your questions.


To summarize- I got an email from a lady that is not in my contacts. She owns a vacation rental and


Actually- I'm not gonna type it all again. Read it or try it yourself. Your wrong. It gets it from an email locally- not any contacts or calendars. Try it yourself and you'll see- I'm not wasting anymore time on it.

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iPad Air, iPad Mini Retina, (2) iPhone 5S, iPod Touch 5
Time Capsule 5, (3) AirPort Express 2, (2) Apple TV 3

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2012 27" iMac i7, 2010 27" iMac i7, 2011 Mac Mini i5
iPad Air, iPad Mini Retina, (2) iPhone 5S, iPod Touch 5
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post #52 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andysol View Post

You're having trouble comprehending.

Read my previous post on the other page and it will answer your questions.


To summarize- I got an email from a lady that is not in my contacts. She owns a vacation rental and


Actually- I'm not gonna type it all again. Read it or try it yourself. Your wrong. It gets it from an email locally- not any contacts or calendars. Try it yourself and you'll see- I'm not wasting anymore time on it.

I've read that and the point I tried to make stays standing. It can lay local connections between f.e. Maps and what is determined to be addresses in your e-mail (and this can logically happen offline). But that still doesn't mean that the original scan to determine what is an address and the recognition of the name happens locally (in the case of your vacation reservation 3 months ago when the email arrived).

The determination of what are addresses in emails and discovery of names and the linking of them happens automatically at arrival (and is then stored locally) and not at the moment you search for it in maps f.e.. It happens in advance. See what I mean now with it being able to lay offline connections being irrelevant to the original scanning of the email for the determination of addresses in emails?
Edited by Chipsy - 3/4/14 at 7:40am
post #53 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

Fine, but there is a big divide between Apple parsing your messages to determine what's a calendar event and what's a phone number, and Google creating targeted ads for users based on their previous usage history.

Excellent timing. Looks as tho Apple is trying to get a whole lot heavier into targeted ads. Coming soon to an iPhone near you, and in full screen too.
http://adage.com/article/digital/apple-bringing-full-screen-video-iads-mobile-apps/291985/
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post #54 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

Excellent timing. Looks as tho Apple is trying to get a whole lot heavier into targeted ads. Coming soon to an iPhone near you, and in full screen too.
http://adage.com/article/digital/apple-bringing-full-screen-video-iads-mobile-apps/291985/

1) I can see this for apps like the Comedy Central app that don't want to play full videos in their app because they can't do full ads like they can on TV or their website.

2) Their suggestion of coming to an iPad near you sounds speculative. I wonder if this was designed for their upcoming (hopefully) revamp of the Apple TV paradigm.

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"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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