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Roundup: Video of Apple's CarPlay in action with Mercedes, Volvo, & Ferrari - Page 2

post #41 of 50
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Originally Posted by Dickprinter View Post

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Originally Posted by Slurpy View Post

That Mercedes video was one of the creepiest things ive ever seen. That guy looks like a sociopath rapist.
Guy? Dude looks like a lady?

Maybe he was watching the video on one of Apple's more glossy displays. 1wink.gif

The Mercedes video I saw has a woman in it too.
post #42 of 50

The Volvo system looks pretty nice.  Like the guy said in it Siri is most likely how you are going to interact with Carplay the most, and he showed how it worked for some things.  My guess is it could have been used much more, but he also purposely used the touchscreen to show how it works also, without repeating the same tasks both ways.

 

Ferrari is known to have a horrible infotainment system (along with most of the other supercars).  These systems have pretty much been slapped together and thrown in quickly so they can be offered.  These companies tend to spend their engineering time/talent working on the things people really buy those kinds of cars for, style, power, performance.  This is probably the exact same screen and system they have been using for a while just with CarPlay added.  I would guess that in a year or two they will have a better designed system with a capacitive touchscreen if CarPlay starts to do well.

 

Similar thing with the Mercedes.  They know that a lot of their car sales will be to current Mercedes owners.  Those owners have been using the scroll wheel/button controls for a while and are used to it.  They want to keep those controls available so those customers aren't frightened away by a huge change in controls right away, not to mention their system will still be used if no iPhone is present, so they still need those controls for that.   However, new owners that haven't used the old controls will probably use Siri and the touchscreen to do most things, so that is offered too.  Like with the Ferrari, I could see them changing their system and getting rid of that wheel control if CarPlay starts to do well and people quit using it.

post #43 of 50
I guess the logic of saying Volvo is a Swedish automaker is the same as saying that Chrysler is an American, not a Italian.

But I agree it is very confusing indeed that for example spotify is mentioned as a Swiss company not a swedish.
post #44 of 50
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Originally Posted by Woochifer View Post

The other issue lies with how the in-dash systems would operate without any Apple devices attached.  This is where every car maker has their own approach.  Mercedes and BMW have the low mounted toggle knobs, while VW and Hyundai use hard buttons flanking the touchscreen, and Ford goes with an all-touch approach.  And some car makers will assign other functions such as climate control to the on-screen touch controls, while other makers choose to keep those functions separate from the infotainment unit.  This is not a situation where Apple can control the entire widget, since car makers can have huge functional differences between their own models (and even trim levels on the same model). 

If anything, the announcement is probably sooner than Apple's normal rollout schedule.  But, March is the latter part of the car show season where auto makers announce and display their models for the upcoming year.  Summer would be a lousy time to make this kind of announcement, since much of the auto industry is in retooling and clearance mode by that time.  And Apple cannot keep something like CarPlay under wraps with things as conspicuous as a Siri button on the steering wheel or a CarPlay button on the in-dash system already appearing in the display models. 

And if anyone's going to play the "Steve would have done this" game, would Jobs have approved basically licensing iOS to the auto makers and letting them handle the implementation independently without any integration with Apple hardware?  Considering the long model cycles for cars, Apple would have to jump deep into the car design process early on.  And if they wanted to impose a uniform standard that would be consistent from one auto maker to another, they would have to have buy-in very early and from a lot of different car companies.  This would be a lot harder with cars than with smartphones, given the lack of uniform standards with in-dash systems and the level of integration between the infotainment system and other functions.

With CarPlay, the OS is integrated into an iOS device.  As an overlay, it's much easier to integrate into an existing in-dash system, than to require that the entire system run on iOS.  As it is, CarPlay will drive iOS device sales and/or strengthen tie-ins with existing iOS owners, and Apple will maintain control over the UI and the feature updates.  To me, that's more in line with Jobs' vision. 

Well, "iOS in the Car" ended up just being "AirPlay" for cars. An accessory, not a new product. It supports tie in of existing iPhones but is not a new product category that drives new sales. As a shareholder, that is what I hoped for. With hundred millions new cars sold globally every year, and considering existing UIs in cars are bad and thus a sweet spot for an "Apple Revolution", launching a new Apple product that is truly "iOS in the car", would be a dramatic revenue booster.
post #45 of 50
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Originally Posted by Beerstalker View Post

The Volvo system looks pretty nice.  Like the guy said in it Siri is most likely how you are going to interact with Carplay the most, and he showed how it worked for some things.  My guess is it could have been used much more, but he also purposely used the touchscreen to show how it works also, without repeating the same tasks both ways.

Ferrari is known to have a horrible infotainment system (along with most of the other supercars).  These systems have pretty much been slapped together and thrown in quickly so they can be offered.  These companies tend to spend their engineering time/talent working on the things people really buy those kinds of cars for, style, power, performance.  This is probably the exact same screen and system they have been using for a while just with CarPlay added.  I would guess that in a year or two they will have a better designed system with a capacitive touchscreen if CarPlay starts to do well.

Similar thing with the Mercedes.  They know that a lot of their car sales will be to current Mercedes owners.  Those owners have been using the scroll wheel/button controls for a while and are used to it.  They want to keep those controls available so those customers aren't frightened away by a huge change in controls right away, not to mention their system will still be used if no iPhone is present, so they still need those controls for that.   However, new owners that haven't used the old controls will probably use Siri and the touchscreen to do most things, so that is offered too.  Like with the Ferrari, I could see them changing their system and getting rid of that wheel control if CarPlay starts to do well and people quit using it.

Ferrari drivers don't listen to music, they listen to the engine. And they don't need directions, they know where they are going.
post #46 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by sflagel View Post

Ferrari drivers don't listen to music, they listen to the engine.

More fool them.
"If the young are not initiated into the village, they will burn it down just to feel its warmth."
- African proverb
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"If the young are not initiated into the village, they will burn it down just to feel its warmth."
- African proverb
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post #47 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by sflagel View Post


Well, "iOS in the Car" ended up just being "AirPlay" for cars. An accessory, not a new product. It supports tie in of existing iPhones but is not a new product category that drives new sales. As a shareholder, that is what I hoped for. With hundred millions new cars sold globally every year, and considering existing UIs in cars are bad and thus a sweet spot for an "Apple Revolution", launching a new Apple product that is truly "iOS in the car", would be a dramatic revenue booster.


Why does it have to be a new product?  You're talking about Apple needing to introduce a new product category.  How would such a product be integrated into cars, and how would Apple tap into the "hundreds millions new cars sold globally" that you mention?  If you're talking about hardware designed by Apple that would be installed by auto makers, that's no different than an audio system upgrade or other branded options that car makers currently offer.  And how would such a product account for the myriad of configurations that vary even between models from the same auto maker?  Would there actually be a single iOS product or would you have an endless portfolio of different variants?

 

If you look at how branded OEM systems are done on the audio side by companies such as Bose and Harman (who brand their premium systems under the Lexicon, Mark Levinson, JBL, Infinity, and B&W labels, and supply generic OEM models as well), they come in very early in the design process and work with the engineers to integrate their systems into the car design.  The parameters though are set by the auto makers, and the OEMs have to work with them.  Even though Bose, for example, designs audio systems for numerous car models, the implementation varies considerably from one model to another. 

 

As a hardware play, Apple would need to either offer up a one-size-fits-most standard, knowing that Microsoft already has a foothold in the market and Google has its own plans, which limits the leverage that they can apply on auto makers to conform to whatever standard Apple lays out for iOS in the car.  Or Apple would need to introduce multiple variants in order work within the design parameters set by the auto makers.  Either option to me does not seem like it would make a significant contribution to the iOS ecosystem.  Consider that Harman is the #1 OEM supplier of car audio systems, and IIRC that revenue amounts to less than $3 billion annually.  Compare that to the $170 billion that Apple took in last year. Automakers are not going to shell out huge bucks for their in-dash systems, and offering an Apple-branded system solely as a higher priced option would severely limit the market potential.

 

If anything, CarPlay allows Apple to access a very large cross-section of the auto industry in a short time, while simultaneously expanding its ecosystem and protecting its margins.  I see a lot of potential for car-based apps that can be customized to different car models.  And if you track the trends for Apple's business categories, you'd see that iTunes is by far the fastest growing part of the business and would rank among the 200 largest global companies by itself.  Apple is now more about the ecosystem than anything.

post #48 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Woochifer View Post


Why does it have to be a new product?  You're talking about Apple needing to introduce a new product category.  How would such a product be integrated into cars, and how would Apple tap into the "hundreds millions new cars sold globally" that you mention?  If you're talking about hardware designed by Apple that would be installed by auto makers, that's no different than an audio system upgrade or other branded options that car makers currently offer.  And how would such a product account for the myriad of configurations that vary even between models from the same auto maker?  Would there actually be a single iOS product or would you have an endless portfolio of different variants?

If you look at how branded OEM systems are done on the audio side by companies such as Bose and Harman (who brand their premium systems under the Lexicon, Mark Levinson, JBL, Infinity, and B&W labels, and supply generic OEM models as well), they come in very early in the design process and work with the engineers to integrate their systems into the car design.  The parameters though are set by the auto makers, and the OEMs have to work with them.  Even though Bose, for example, designs audio systems for numerous car models, the implementation varies considerably from one model to another. 

As a hardware play, Apple would need to either offer up a one-size-fits-most standard, knowing that Microsoft already has a foothold in the market and Google has its own plans, which limits the leverage that they can apply on auto makers to conform to whatever standard Apple lays out for iOS in the car.  Or Apple would need to introduce multiple variants in order work within the design parameters set by the auto makers.  Either option to me does not seem like it would make a significant contribution to the iOS ecosystem.  Consider that Harman is the #1 OEM supplier of car audio systems, and IIRC that revenue amounts to less than $3 billion annually.  Compare that to the $170 billion that Apple took in last year. Automakers are not going to shell out huge bucks for their in-dash systems, and offering an Apple-branded system solely as a higher priced option would severely limit the market potential.

If anything, CarPlay allows Apple to access a very large cross-section of the auto industry in a short time, while simultaneously expanding its ecosystem and protecting its margins.  I see a lot of potential for car-based apps that can be customized to different car models.  And if you track the trends for Apple's business categories, you'd see that iTunes is by far the fastest growing part of the business and would rank among the 200 largest global companies by itself.  Apple is now more about the ecosystem than anything.

Your post has opened my eyes to Apple's strategy. I can see now that designing some kind of hardware for cars was never going to work, because makers will always want to differentiate. What Apple has done is unique for them, and I think it will turn out to be canny.
"If the young are not initiated into the village, they will burn it down just to feel its warmth."
- African proverb
Reply
"If the young are not initiated into the village, they will burn it down just to feel its warmth."
- African proverb
Reply
post #49 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Beerstalker View Post
 

The Volvo system looks pretty nice.  Like the guy said in it Siri is most likely how you are going to interact with Carplay the most, and he showed how it worked for some things.  My guess is it could have been used much more, but he also purposely used the touchscreen to show how it works also, without repeating the same tasks both ways.

 

Ferrari is known to have a horrible infotainment system (along with most of the other supercars).  These systems have pretty much been slapped together and thrown in quickly so they can be offered.  These companies tend to spend their engineering time/talent working on the things people really buy those kinds of cars for, style, power, performance.  This is probably the exact same screen and system they have been using for a while just with CarPlay added.  I would guess that in a year or two they will have a better designed system with a capacitive touchscreen if CarPlay starts to do well.

 

Similar thing with the Mercedes.  They know that a lot of their car sales will be to current Mercedes owners.  Those owners have been using the scroll wheel/button controls for a while and are used to it.  They want to keep those controls available so those customers aren't frightened away by a huge change in controls right away, not to mention their system will still be used if no iPhone is present, so they still need those controls for that.   However, new owners that haven't used the old controls will probably use Siri and the touchscreen to do most things, so that is offered too.  Like with the Ferrari, I could see them changing their system and getting rid of that wheel control if CarPlay starts to do well and people quit using it.


Yep, I think Siri is the killer app here, especially if Apple opens up Siri to third party developers, as rumored. 

 

Right now, Apple has to play ball with the auto industry simply because there's no consistency or standard with how the different systems are designed and implemented.  Something as seemingly simple as the climate control varies wildly from one car model to another, or even one trim level to another.  Some car makers allow for touch control, others don't.  And with the in-dash units, some designs use touchscreens exclusively, others rely on a combination of buttons and touch, and others rely primarily on buttons and dials.

 

Stuff like the button layouts can't be changed overnight -- they might need to wait for the next model or midcycle refresh.  As you mentioned, Mercedes has used their scroll wheel setup for a few model runs now, and these are not things that they can easily scrap. 

 

CarPlay essentially duplicates the OEM system's functions, while overlaying it with the familiar iOS interface.  The value that CarPlay adds over and above the OEM system is where something like Siri comes in.  And that value creates tighter consumer tie-in with the iOS ecosystem, and creates new value for iOS devices. 

post #50 of 50
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Originally Posted by Benjamin Frost View Post

Your post has opened my eyes to Apple's strategy. I can see now that designing some kind of hardware for cars was never going to work, because makers will always want to differentiate. What Apple has done is unique for them, and I think it will turn out to be canny.
This may all very well be true. but it supports what the critical voices are saying about Apple. That they rely wholly on the iPhone, and is no longer expected to come out with new successful product categories. that it is not able to reinvent industries that need reinvention. CarPlay is as such not bad (although I can't see much benefit over a simple Bluetooth connection), but not exciting from a Corporate perspective.
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